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Thread: Tornado??

  1. #1
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    Default Tornado??

    check this out, you could see the twist and everything, there were three of them in the same system last week up in unit 13...a little spooky.

    Www.blackriverhunting.com
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  2. #2
    Member akhunter3's Avatar
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    Default Cool.

    Ain't seen onna those in years....


    Did it touch the ground?? I remember seeing something on the news the other day about a couple.





    Jon

  3. #3
    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
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    Talking .416

    Are you sure that wasn't created by the muzzle blast of your .416?

    kingfisherktn

  4. #4
    Member COtoAK's Avatar
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    Default

    Crazy.
    I actually thought that moving to Alaska would make me exempt from seeing and experiencing tornadoes.
    I suppose not.
    It brings me back to my Colorado days.
    Lurker.

  5. #5
    Member AKMarmot's Avatar
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    Default 2 one day

    We saw two in one system labor day weekend a couple yrs ago by the maclrean river. The one is just forming here in the center of photo & actually was kind of spooky when it made it to the ground.
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  6. #6

    Default Perhaps this is what you saw?

    Cold-air (or cold-core) funnel clouds are usually short-lived and generally much weaker than the vortices produced by supercells. Although cold-air funnels rarely make ground contact, they may touch down briefly and become weak tornadoes or waterspouts.


    A shear funnel extending from a generic cumulus cloud. Observed in northern Texas by a member of the VORTEX project.Unlike the related phenomenon associated with severe thunderstorms, cold-air funnels are generally associated with partly cloudy skies in the wake of cold fronts, where atmospheric instability and moisture is sufficient to support towering cumulus clouds but not precipitation. The mixing of cooler air in the lower troposphere with air flowing in a different direction in the middle troposphere causes the rotation on a horizontal axis, which, when deflected vertically by atmospheric conditions, can become a funnel cloud.[1]

    They are a common sight along the Pacific Coast and USA, particularly in the spring or autumn.[1]

  7. #7
    Member SoggyMountain's Avatar
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    Default

    When I worked in Denali, one of the local photographers snapped a series of pictures of a torando near Stampede Rd. It touched ground and you could see the debris field in it...

    He sent the photos to the Fairbanks newspaper, and to NOAA. Both told him that it was "just a funnel cloud." Yet... you could see it coming down through the photos until it reached the ground.

    I will always believe he had snapped a picture of a legitimate, albeit short-lived tornado based on what I saw.

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