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Thread: game carts

  1. #1
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    Default game carts

    Was thinking of purchasing a game cart from cabelas. I'm looking at their super mag game cart that is rated at 550 pounds. How practical would you suppose it would be to own one up here if most of the moose hunting I plan on doing will be from the road system?

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    Personally I don't think game carts would work very well for most terrain I've hunted on in Alaska. Maybe a few occasions but you need terra firma for a cart with wheels. AND it's a LOT of work and slow going to pull a loaded cart. We used them on walk in sheep hunt last year on fairly flat hard terrain. About 80 lbs going in and 150+ coming out. I can't even imagine trying to pull 500 lbs of cart up or down a trail. We had about 6 miles of actual dirt road and then 3 or so miles of atv trail. Hard flat atv trail wasn't too bad. When it gets soft, uneven or hilly it gets tricky. In fact a few times we had to unload the carts, pack the gear, then go back and pull the carts up empty. A few times I sure wish I would have had a brake. I almost got pulled down the hill backwards a couple times and alomost got pushed down and run over a couple times too!!
    Here's the story: sheep 06

    and here's some pics sheep o6 pics

    I say save your money, get a good pack frame and get in good shape.

    If you have to transport meat under your own power over uneven terrain the ol backpack/packframe really is the best way to go. But, if you have a hard, flat road or trail a cart can work. But you don't find those too often in moose country.
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

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    Default mule

    We use an aluminum, single axle cart called a mule. I agree with Snyd, there are a lot of places you can't effectively use it. But when you have that one in a 1000 spot it is really handy.
    I had a place in the Tanana flats with a hard trail that went well over 6 miles away from the river. We tried to not take atv's in there just to keep it a secret, and it worked. The cart did come in handy, but the dirt was firm.
    I also have used it on several Yukon adventures not only to get moose out of places I maybe should not have gone, but to get moose from the backside of a sandbar to the front and into the boat without getting sand on the meat.
    I have also use packframes, as stretcher, and my back with just a raincoat between me and the meat. Pretty funny to see to big guys put a 1/4 on a 155 lb guy and watch him stagger away. Yeah, I was the little guy but I always liked big challenges.
    Again, going back to what Snyd said, there is a lot of difference between 1/4 of a moose weighing in at 150lb +/- with 2 guys on level ground and loading up the cart you mentioned to max gross weight and trying to get around by yourself in the hills or tussocks.

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    Synd is right:
    The thought of dragging even an EMPTY one through the woods and swamps would give me nightmares. You'd be better off with a sled.
    Smitty of the North
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    I second the sled idea. I haven't used one on a moose but I've taken whole black bears out with one. Works great in the woods and swamps. I now need to get another one. The last one has the bottom ate out of it becuase I had to drag a bear the last 1 1/2 miles on a gravel road. The gravel wore holes in it with that much weight. I used it 10 -12 times on the gravel taking in bait, stand and stuff.

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    Default Cart Modifications

    I have used a couple of different carts for a walk-in caribou area that runs along a (mostly) firm ridge. I agree with the comment about a one in a thousand spot...it really helps then. Here are some things I have discovered and partially put into practice:

    - If you buy a cabelas cart or one from Sportsman's, pitch the #$$@ wheels and get minimum 20" or 24" tires. I am looking at motorcycle tires or the all-terrain wheelchair tires for mine. I can tell you from experience that the poly wheels they come with can break right in half if the cart tilts with a load on it.
    - Replace the axle and give your cart a wider stance (even if it requires some welding)
    - Purchase some 1" tubular steel and extent the front and rear similar to a harness. Ensure you enclose it (especially in the front) and pad the Hades out of it. I got this idea from an all terrain expedition cart in National Geographic. That extension really provides some leverage and allows you to stand inside and push. The back extension gives your buddy a place to hold on to and keep you from becoming a trail pizza on the steep downhills.

    I hope this helps. I use the cart only in one or two spots but, when I do, it makes a difference. Now, for the flip side....pack light and don't rely on the cart other than to get meat out.

    Dave

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    Default Dead sled?

    Quote Originally Posted by Casper50 View Post
    I second the sled idea. I haven't used one on a moose but I've taken whole black bears out with one. Works great in the woods and swamps. I now need to get another one. The last one has the bottom ate out of it becuase I had to drag a bear the last 1 1/2 miles on a gravel road. The gravel wore holes in it with that much weight. I used it 10 -12 times on the gravel taking in bait, stand and stuff.
    Are you talking a "Dead Sled"? Or a snowmachine type sled? I myself have a dead sled from Cabela's but haven't put it to use yet. If I get my goat in a coupla weeks, maybe it will work great.
    Johnny

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    I had a 5 1/2' black plastic down hill sled. I've been looking at the dead sled. I've been told that it's made out of some kind of really hard slick plastic. I've just about talked myself into buying one.

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    Default on a road......

    in a non motorized area it would be fine

    now that sounds crazy, but there are places that have dirt roads or fairly well established trails...... but you can't use any motorized methods to get in there to hunt (or haul your gear in or game out)

    a cart might be just the ticket if you're hunting in an area like that

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    Quote Originally Posted by AKCheese View Post
    in a non motorized area it would be fine

    now that sounds crazy, but there are places that have dirt roads or fairly well established trails...... but you can't use any motorized methods to get in there to hunt (or haul your gear in or game out)

    a cart might be just the ticket if you're hunting in an area like that
    I was thinking a cart and maybe a bicycle might work on those oil field roads above the Swanson. or the far end of Mystery Creek rd.

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    Quote Originally Posted by .338-06 View Post
    I was thinking a cart and maybe a bicycle might work on those oil field roads above the Swanson. or the far end of Mystery Creek rd.
    Ya, a cart and a bicyle works great on a decent road. On our DCUA walkin it was about 6 miles of road. Sure was nice to ride instead of walk! Especially coming out, loaded heavy and it was downhill
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

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    Default Cabela's Mag Hauler is Awsome, most places

    I purchased a Cabela's Mag Hauler several years ago from the store in SD for Antelope hunting. I hiked in about 5 miles, according to my GPS, shot two Antelope, loaded them up and headed out. What a deal, worked great. I brought it to Alaska when I moved here and attempted to use it for a Caribou hunt. The large diameter tires are hard solid rubber and cannot go flat. Due to their size they role easily over most objects, unlike smaller diameter tires. Rolling the cart, folded up, out to where I found the 'bou wasn't difficult at all. But, after loading it things changed. Trying to pull that cart up and over hiloc after hiloc was impossible. They used to make a hitch adapter that would allow the cart to be attached to an ATV, but they do not make it anymore, the attachement holes are still there on the handle though. by attaching a long pipe across the front two people could easily pull it I am sure. That being said, the Mag Hauler works great on fairly flat terrain, but mine has been dissassembled and is in storage in my garage for now.

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    Default Thanks for the inputs

    I just placed my order.. Had some Cabelas points to use. This fall I drew a Ft. Rich bull tag and I think it will come in very handy on the South Post. I was up in there Sunday and there are a ton of trails to drag it up and down.

    Thanks again,

    francko

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    What would work very well on dirt trails would be home-made carts with ATV knobby tires. For example, the cart itself could be made of aluminum to keep the weight down, and looking like some of the Chinese carts men pull to taxi people cross towns. The meat carts would have to be much smaller of course, and the only steel would be on the wheels, hubs and axle. The rest can be made of welded aluminum tubing. Bicycle tires sink deep in the mud or soft dirt.

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    Found an interesting website, www.bikesatwork.com, last night. They sell cargo trailers for bikes that have a 300lb cap.

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