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Thread: 91 Arctic Cat Super Jag Trail Kit?

  1. #1
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    Default 91 Arctic Cat Super Jag Trail Kit?

    I bought a 91 AC Super Jag last spring and now I am getting ready to make sure it is ready for the winter. I replaced the pull rope (it was fraying), and looked everything else over to make sure nothing was cracked or broken. My question is what would you all recomend doing as far as replacing, watching, carrying spares of etc.
    I picked up a service manual right a way and have gone through it to familiarize myself with the engine and basics.
    I am new to snowmachines so any suggestions would help.
    Thanks,
    MAN

  2. #2
    Member Yellowknife's Avatar
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    I have that exact same machine sitting out back. It's gotten to the point though, were I spend an hour working on it for every hour ridding it. Not that many miles, but it's just old.

    Couple things that you need to check:

    Rear suspension limiting strap. It's a critical piece on those old 'cats and your suspension arm with "invert" and cause lots of havoc if it rots and breaks like mine did last year.

    The four bolts that hold the suspension to the tub also need checked. They will wash out the aluminum axle threads and rattle out.

  3. #3
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    Thanks Yellowknife! I will check it out.
    have you had any problems with the oil infection system? I am considering taking it off and premixing my gas.

  4. #4
    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Exclamation You've got your work cut out...

    Don't bother to try and dump the oil injection system. This era of Cat has a good functional oil system and you'll only use a fraction of the oil by keeping it working. The maintenance item I would suggest for your oil system is to completely drain the oil tank and hose, then pick a single brand of oil that you will use and refill the system with that oil. Always use the same oil - never ever mix brands or types as this is the cause of oil system failures. Check the service manual for instructions on adjusting the oil pump, which is linked to the throttle cables. After working over the oil system, you'll want to run the first tank of gas at 50:1 premix just to ensure adequate oiling while you verify the system is functioning. Mark the oil level on the oil tank and ensure it is going down after your first ride.

    As suggested, you'll want to give the rear suspension a once over and be especially keen to check those tub mounting bolts on the front (on the sides where the heel of your boot will sit). Check the slides for excess wear and adjust your track tension while you're in there. Also check every idler wheel for loose bearings.

    A few other things to look at on this sled, especially since you have just purchased it in used condition:

    Check the shock tower framework where it is welded to the front frame as well as the bar that connects the hoops on both sides. This is an area well known for stress fractures to develop. If you do find cracks or broken welds here, get them fixed and consider putting in a little extra bracing. I've repaired a couple and added some small triangle steel braces at these corners to beef them up.

    While you're up there, check the ski alignment and all the front suspension parts and joints. You're looking for worn out bushings, tie rod ends, and inspecting all welds for cracks.

    Get some snowmobile gear chain oil and open up the chaincase (right side of engine). Drain out all the old oil and look for evidence of metal shavings, water, or rust on the parts or in the fluid and in the bottom of the case. Water indicates a bad seal, which could be the case cover seal, but may be a bearing seal. It is not uncommon to have the lower (drive shaft) bearing seal damaged from the other side, which will eventually lead to bearing failure and destruction of your drive shaft. It's also quite possible to have this happen to the top (jack shaft) bearing. You can actually run on a bad jack shaft bearing long enough to wear an irrepairable groove in the shaft without knowing it from the driver's seat. Check the slack in your chain. I believe this model has the automatic chain tensioner, so check the condition of that system as well. With the age of this sled, though you didn't mention how many miles are on it, you may be due for a new chain and possibly gears or bearings.

    Do a thorough run through of the carb, checking the float bowl for signs of water and checking the adjustments on cables, throttle stops, etc. See your service manual for all the specifics. The fuel pump and all the connecting fuel lines also need a once over. Look for areas on fuel lines that may be rubbing against something and causing a wear through. Fuel pumps deserve to be rebuilt periodically and the gasket/parts kit to do so is quite cheap, so you might consider doing that.

    Electrical system needs a full check out. Look for areas where wires may be rubbing against framework and wearing through the insulation. Check all the connectors for good connections and lack of corrosion. Some dielectric grease on those connections will prevent corrosion. One item that frequently has problems is the voltage regulator. It is usually mounted somewhere on the right firewall. It must ground to the frame through the body and this often builds corrosion and loses its ground connection, thereby no longer limiting the voltage put out by your lighting coils to 12 VAC. This will blow out light bulbs and such. The other end of that is a failure of the regulator and no votage to your lighting system. If all the connections look good, fire it up and put a voltmeter on the lighting system. You should have about 12 VAC (note it is AC current, not DC).

    Check the spark plugs and all the connections to the ignition coil. As you just got this machine, I would suggest starting with a brand new set of plugs and at least 2 spares gapped and tucked away somewhere safe. These older sleds are notorious for fouling plugs, so a wrench and spares is as mandatory as gas and oil.

    Give the clutches a once over, looking at the sliders, springs, and friction points for wear. Check everything for cracks or damage. Look at your service manual for specs.

    Another spot to keep an eye on is the exhaust system. Check the areas around the connections for cracks. Ensure the outlet (under the sled) is not damaged or has a squirrel's nest built in there. Check all the mounting points on the muffler box for damage.

    There are several tuning steps you should go through as well. Instructions for everything is in that service manual, so that is going to be your best bet. I would suggest reading the entire manual just to become familiar with all aspects of this sled.

    My final tip, always ride with a buddy and make sure you have some basic tools and a tow rope in the event that something does break. I've done a lot of riding on 90-91 era Cats and have been towed in my fair share of times. As this is an aging sled, you need to go out with the expectation that something will go wrong. Then you'll be happily surprised when everything works right and you make it home under your own power, but you'll be prepared if you break something.

    Good luck.

  5. #5
    Member Yellowknife's Avatar
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    I also second checking the electrical system. Might be worth carrying an extra voltage regulator and bulbs if you are doing long trips. Also only replace with the OEM Cat parts. I tried using a cheapo voltage regulator in a pinch and it lasted until I was exactly 24 miles from the road and getting dark.

    Another thing to check will be the needle and seat. The get worn out and it will leak fuel. Cheap to replace.

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