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Thread: Remington Core Lokt

  1. #1

    Default Remington Core Lokt

    Looking for some experts, or at least someone more knowledgeable tham myself (shouldn't be hard). I am a relatively inexperienced hunter, and brand new to Alaska hunting. I am going on a moose hunt, and was told that 180 grain for my .30-06 would be sufficient. Along with my little experience comes little money. I am looking for a load that will do the job. I am a firm believer in getting what you pay for, but some of the ammo is a bit expensive. Will the Remington Core Lokt take care of business, or will I find myself tracking for miles? Thanks in advance for your thoughts.

  2. #2
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Default Good stuff!

    Wow, you triggered a flood of memories there, friend. I used to use Remington Core-Lokt bullets in my Ruger M77 7mm Rem. Mag. for many years, deer hunting in Oregon. Since moving to Alaska I used the 7mm for everything except brown bear, with very good success with 175 grain? Remington Core-Lokt ammunition. They always did the trick for me and I never lost an animal, or even had to trail one very far.

    Since then I have changed out for other calibers, and am using Federal Premiums in my .375 now. But those Core-Lokt bullets worked well for me.

    Good luck to you, in whatever you decide.

    Best regards,

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
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    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
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  3. #3
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    Default core lokt bullets

    you should be fine with core lokt bullets weighing 180 grains, shot placement will be more critacal for a clean kill.

  4. #4
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    Default core-lokt

    I've also used them quite a bit and have never had a problem and they've been accurate out of every gun I've shot them through, can't beat it for price but I would draw the line at big bears though. Use a premium bonded core for them.

  5. #5
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Default

    Wow, I'm surprised to hear such good reviews. I also use core-lokt bullets in my 30-06 and 7mm Mag, but anytime the bullet is mentioned there are many nay sayers. Go ahead and use them - they've knocked down countless animals and as long as you know your rifle and stay within your accurate range, you should be good.

  6. #6
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    Default

    I'd bet that Core-Lokt's have killed more game than all the rest combined......or close to it anyway.
    The Marines I have seen around the world have the cleanest bodies, the filthiest minds, the highest morale, and the lowest morals of any group of animals I have ever seen. Thank God for the United States Marine Corps! (Eleanor Roosevelt, 1945)

  7. #7
    Member junkak's Avatar
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    Default same

    Running 180 gr CoreLokts on my 30.06 for the last 2 years.

    Last year I failed to account for distance and fired. The moose remained motionless allowing another shot. Next shot I raised the barrel up just a hair and fired. The moose fell over like dead weight.

    After skinning, a friend wanted the bell to tan out. Couple minutes later he showed me where the first shot went

    Dumb moose.. gets shot in the bell and stands there waiting for another.

  8. #8

    Default Be wary of shot angles

    On a moose I'd stick to reasonable distances and shot angles. I'd say you're good out to a couple hundred yards as long as the animal is broadside. I wouldn't try any extreme quartering angles or frontal shots with that bullet.

  9. #9

    Default

    I shoot Nosler Partition because I realized that the cost of the bullet is nothing in comparison to the cost of the trip. But like others, I to started out with the Core Lock and it always performed well.

  10. #10
    Member mod elan's Avatar
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    Default

    I too am surprised at the amount of good reviews. A few times in the past these bullets have been bad mouthed as junk. I've been using them for years in a 300WM at 180 grains. Seems to do the job including the 180 yard head shot on last winters moose. Dropped like a piano feel on it's head. Shot placement is key with any bullet.

  11. #11

    Default After the Shot...

    The other guys have covered the bullet - since you mentioned you're new to Alaska hunting, let me toss out a couple of things that may be different from other hunting you've done.

    Moose are WAY bigger than most other animals we hunt in the lower 48! Often, their reaction to a double-lung shot is to remain standing like you missed them - but if they stand there like a statue, often that's your best indication that yoiu made a solid hit; they just take a couple of minutes to react visibly sometimes. Regardless - don't admire your first shot too long, be prepared for 1-2 follow-up shots! I keep firing until they fall.

    Also - moose take quite a bit of work to field dress! Expect to take 3-4 hours to do the whole job, especially if you're on a remote hunt and need to quarter the animal into packable loads. If there are two or three of you to do it, the job goes faster. And bring your sharpener with you - they're a lot harder on a blade (due to their mass) than deer and elk.

    Oh yeah - ENJOY your moose hunt! Their really big, and fun to hunt - nothing quite like seeing a big ol' bull come meandering through the willows!

    Good luck and good hunting,

    Michael

  12. #12
    Member alaska bush man's Avatar
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    Thumbs up 180gr On sale

    alot of beast have fallen over the years to 180gr 30-06 CL ........The Fed 180gr Soft Point 30-06 is also good and on sale at Sentry Hardware $12.99 a box.
    Alaska

  13. #13

    Default

    The 180 grain corlokt is one of my favorite 30 caliber bullets. Their 35 caliber models are dandy, too. I'd have no hesitation using your proposed loads for moose.

  14. #14
    Member sharksinthesalsa's Avatar
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    Default core lokt

    ive used these bullets for a number of years in my 30/06 at 180 grains.....have had no trouble what so ever with them. good luck hunting and listen to md his advice is good.... and GO BLUE

  15. #15
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    Default 180 grain corlokt

    Thats the only bullet I shoot out of my 30:06 and it has done well on sheep, caribou, blackbear,moose and bison. Like others have said shot placement is the main thing but those bullets hold together and work great. They shoot really well for me too at the range. BC

  16. #16
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Default Too true...

    Quote Originally Posted by mdhunter View Post
    ...Moose are WAY bigger than most other animals we hunt in the lower 48! Often, their reaction to a double-lung shot is to remain standing like you missed them...I keep firing until they fall...
    Michael,

    This reminds me of my dad's first and only Alaska-Yukon moose. I took him up into GMU 23 many years ago and he shot a bull from about 80 yards. The animal was standing broadside, working a willow over with his antlers. Dad shot him and he just stood there. So he fired two more times and we waited. Suddenly the bull reared straight up on his hind legs, and fell over backwards dead as a stone. It was most impressive to see an animal that large do something like that. The last shot was through the heart. I've always thought that reaction was sort of strange. But very impressive.

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  17. #17
    Member sharksinthesalsa's Avatar
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    Default flippers

    it really sucks when the big ones flip over like that ....they are in a great way to gut or whatever but pictures ussually come first so you have to move them.....then the fun begins....i've had to dig antlers out of the ground before...it sucks...and that was on hard ground i don't want to think about in a bog or marsh.....i like it when they just fall over on their side

  18. #18

    Default What a Sight THAT Would Have Been!

    Hey Mike,

    I'd have loved to see that - 1200 - 1400 pounds levitating like that! Majestic is the best word I know to describe a big bull. I bet your Dad was thrilled!

    Last year out of Tok, I shot a 55 incher at about 200 yards with my .338 WinMag - he never moved when I hit him with the first one, so I gave him another one....he flinched when that one hit him, and fell over after a few seconds...but we still had to finish him off when we walked up to him!

    Michael

  19. #19
    Member Marc Taylor's Avatar
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    Default Destructive:

    You'll look for the large piece of hide blown out of your exit hole, but upon closer inspection it will really be just a laceration, easily sewn back together by your taxidermist. But it will be a gaping hole, for sure.

    Very explosive on impact. It won't leave much to weigh if you find the core on the other side.

    Taylor

  20. #20
    Member akndres's Avatar
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    Default

    Go Blue

    A remington core lokt is a fine round. It will never win any of the glam awards like the nosler, barnes, TBBC, etc. Like others have said, the remington ammo has been putting meat in the freezer for years. However, let me throw this at you.

    I shot a 66" moose up in the White Mtns in '04. It was 325+- yards away. I was using a Savage 30-06 with Winchester Fail Safe 180 grainers. I put the first round behind the shoulder... the bull didn't flinch. Thinking I missed, I racked another downrange. I hear the second un-mistakable thud... the bull still didn't flinch. I racked another in the chamber as the bull turned to look up the hill were I was shooting from. I aimed for the center chest and fired.... no thud... no movement from the bull. Racked #4 and aimed at mid neck... thud... the bull turned and WALKED about 10 feet, out-of-sight behind an alder tree. We found the bull about 20 yards from where the first shot was taken. Two shots behind the shoulder (within 3 inches of each other) --- one was a pass through, one was under the skin on the other side. The third shot was a definite miss. The fourth skimmed the right side rid cage, entered the front of the right ham, centered the femur, busted through, and exited the ham. the bull had massive organ damage and completely bled out to the inside.

    I may be wrong... not trying to belittle the core-lokts, but I'm not so sure I would have gotten that type of penetration/exit/bullet performance from them, with that caliber, at that range. I could be wrong, but I believe the extra dollars for premium bullets are worth the money. I mean the fail safes were only 10 dollars more a box than the remington stuff. I know you're on a budget, as was I at the time, but really $10... Opt for the best bullet you can buy that shoots tight out of your rifle. The recovered fail safe could have been used in a magazine advertisement. It weighed 175 grains and was perfectly pedaled.

    The ammo will be the least expensive part of your trip. 30-06 ammo is cheap anyway... buy BIG GAME bullets and then you won't have the doubt in your mind. Moose soak up punishment, take awhile to bleed out, and have very wide cross-sections. A bullet has it's work cut out for it busting through moose bone, tissue, and muscle.

    Once again, not saying core-lokts wouldn't do the same job, but for the minimal increased cost, buy good heavily constructed ammo. Good luck... moose hunting is unforgettable, just be ready when you have to deal with 1600 lbs of dead weight on the ground.... the fun is over!
    "The rich... who are content to buy what they have not the skill to get by their own excellence, these are the real enemies of game".... Theodore Roosevelt's A Principle of the Hunt

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