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Thread: just showing off a bit

  1. #1

    Default just showing off a bit

    I got this rifle about 4 years ago and have really enjoyed it. I have taken many deer and hogs with it, as well as a Black Bear. it is a remake of the old Indian fighting rifle that Jim Bridger used, and I still think that the point of muzzle loader hunting is to do it the old school way, I feel that I am one of the few left that thinks in that school of though, but I have a good time doing it the way our setteling forefathers did. I only shoot real Black and round balls. There is a great wedsite out there that sells kit rifles like mine and in many other styles.

    http://www.trackofthewolf.com/(S(xjm...5))/index.aspx
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  2. #2
    Member akndres's Avatar
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    Whitlock,

    I feel the same way you do about ML'ing. Why go modern???? The fun/challenge is in doing it the way it was intended. I'm not anti-inline, it's just not fun to me. I see new guns like the CVA Electra and I worry about the future of ML'ing as a "second" season. I'm glad there are still folks like yourself that have fun with a PRB and an old school rifle.

    then again, flintlock hunters say we are too modern....

    That rifle looks alot like a Lyman GPH. If so, they are definitely a fine shooter. Would love to see some pics of the game you've harvested if available.
    "The rich... who are content to buy what they have not the skill to get by their own excellence, these are the real enemies of game".... Theodore Roosevelt's A Principle of the Hunt

  3. #3

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    Track's Bridger hawken has an excellent rep. I've looked long and hard at making one myself, but haven't bitten the bullet yet.

    You'll find lots of like-minded muzzleloaders in Alaska along with those that use the modern alternatives. I'm a traditionalist myself when it comes to hunting, but I own the others too.

    In my experience the dividing line between the two falls pretty closely around the dates of Alaska's special primitive weapon seasons. Folks that also hunt with ML's in the regular season are almost entirely traditionalists, while those that use a ML only for access to the seasons tend to rely on the modern alternatives, returning to their use of conventional arms for the regular season.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by akndres View Post
    Whitlock,

    I feel the same way you do about ML'ing. Why go modern???? The fun/challenge is in doing it the way it was intended. I'm not anti-inline, it's just not fun to me. I see new guns like the CVA Electra and I worry about the future of ML'ing as a "second" season. I'm glad there are still folks like yourself that have fun with a PRB and an old school rifle.

    then again, flintlock hunters say we are too modern....

    That rifle looks alot like a Lyman GPH. If so, they are definitely a fine shooter. Would love to see some pics of the game you've harvested if available.


    I am not an anti inline, but I wish that they would band them from primitive season though. I think that a built up inline should not fall under the primitive weapon category, but I am sure if that happened that not many people would still use them because they cant get in to the woods early any more. I have kill animals will all kinds of weapons, and the ones that I am most proud of are the ones that I have taken with a primitive weapon, hence real black, or long bow. They might be smaller, but they mean more to me. I also love the flintlock stuff, as well, and plan on building one in the near future, a full stocked 36 cal. Glad to know there are more. No offence to any huge inline fans out there; it is just my way of thinking. Yeah I also tan the hides and make clothes and stuff with them too. I learned that from my granddaddy when I was young.

    No the rifle is a remake of the Jim Bridger Hawkin. it has a very heavey barrel that is 36 in long and 1 1/8, 50 cal. I will look around and see if I can find a few pictures, I am deployed now, and dont have all of my pictures, most of my pictures were taken before I had a digital camera.

    Whit
    Last edited by whitlock; 08-24-2007 at 00:27. Reason: for got part of the question.

  5. #5

    Default Pictures

    Ok here are some pictures of some hogs that were killed my me and a couple of my Military buddies a year and a half ago in central Texas. The deer was killed back in Georgia about 4 years ago. Hope that you enjoy them. I am still looking for the pictures of the 6 1/2 Black Bear I killed with it. That was a fun hunt.

    Whit
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  6. #6
    Member akndres's Avatar
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    we used to get after hogs in January when I was stationed down in Louisiana. They are fun to hunt, never went after any with my ML's (wish I had). I usually went after them with my 44. We'd BBQ them up over pecan limbs and natural charcoal...good stuff.

    I initially missed the Bridger reference in your first email. Those are definitely nice guns. Thanks for the pics.

    Stay safe downrange...
    "The rich... who are content to buy what they have not the skill to get by their own excellence, these are the real enemies of game".... Theodore Roosevelt's A Principle of the Hunt

  7. #7

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    Yeah I carried the 454 on the hip as well. We took the pigs back to the house that next morning and had them cleaned up and on my smoker by 9am. Then I ran to the store and got the rest of what we need for the BBQ and me and my wife made Brunswick stew and beans. I think we had the whole company over at my house that day. It was really good Mesquite and charcoal. I have a few boys in the unit that have never been hunting or eating wild game, they lost there minds with it.

    Me and the boys are talking about another hunt when we get back. It will be here soon, we have been here a little over a year now and should be back in mid Dec, I have to wait to come up to AK hunting until next season, but I will do a little down south when I get back. Thanks for the support, and we are all doing well for the most part.

    Whit

  8. #8
    Member jdb3's Avatar
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    One of my hunting partners just took an really nice billy here in Southeast with that same rifle. He has been using his for about 15 years now and has killed everything from deer to moose with it. It really does well with caribou. I believe he took the number 3 caribou and number one black-tail with the same rifle. Only shoots the round ball, he has a mini barrel but the round ball kills better, no matter what Jim Shockey thinks!

  9. #9
    Member akndres's Avatar
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    shockey is a marketing whore...

    used to be, nothing could hold a candle to a knight rifle.... they were the start all-end all...end of story muzzleloader... Obviously thompson-center pays better because he doesn't mention knight anymore. I even caught a reference in one of his last shows on the OLN,,,, he said that he would/has shot a TC out to 200 yards... "something I could never have done with my previous muzzleloader". This wasn't what he was saying a couple years ago with his Knight "long range' rifle. Funny how the story changes with different sponsors.... I wonder if he remembers he was on camera for years spewing the merits of Knight Rifles....

    The man is definitely an accomplished hunter... I would never take that away from him.... I just wonder what he would have to say about his beloved nosler bullets if Barnes became his primary bullet sponsor...
    "The rich... who are content to buy what they have not the skill to get by their own excellence, these are the real enemies of game".... Theodore Roosevelt's A Principle of the Hunt

  10. #10

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    Jdb3 and akndres, I agree with you both about Jim Shockey, it is funny what people will say with there pockets full of money. The thing that is even funnier is when they find a better cash cow that pays more and suddenly the story changes. I have always been a firm believer in finding out what works best for your self rather that let some spokesman tell me how great something is. There also seems to be too many hunters, shooters, fisherman that reads every book and watches every TV show, but doesn’t get out and do it for them self’s.

    Whit

  11. #11

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    I like to call them "keyboard marksmen."

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    I like to call them "keyboard marksmen."
    I like that. Never heard of it called that before, I always called them Saturday morning couch hunters. I never really looked at the shooting magazines until I was deployed, man most of it is adds on new equipment, why would I pay to buy an infomercial??? Not for me.

    Whit

  13. #13

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    I gave up all my shooting mag subscriptions 6 or 8 years ago, but if deployed like you I'd be right back on them simply to stay in touch. Internet changes that a bit, but there's something about picking your spot to curl up and read.

    Probably from over 30 years hunting with bow and handguns, the close range requirements of traditional ML are what attracted me. If I was trying to shoot long range a conventional scoped cartridge gun is much better than even a scoped ML, leaving access to primitive seasons the only reason I would need to use a ML.

    I've got scoped inlines, mostly because they made me curious. I can use them in the regular seasons, but pretty much quit doing that because they were no good compared to my cartridge guns for serious long range capabilities. Now they're range queens- kinda fun to shoot, but not serious hunting tools.

    I do however, use my traditional MLs in regular season because I like the short range restrictions. It would be pretty much the same thing if I stripped the scopes off my inlines, but why bother? Aging hands have pretty much ended my archery career and aging eyes have made it tougher to shoot open-sighted handguns, so open-sighted traditional ML's have filled in for the same need to get close during both regular season and primitive seasons.

    For me it's all about the hunt and getting close, whether using a bow, a handgun or an ML. Even with my cartridge guns I'm happiest digging into the deep tangles with an open sighted lever gun for shots well inside 100 yards. Yup, I have some super whizbang magnums with great scopes and have shot deer well past 400 yards, but I kind of feel like Lee Harvy Oswald when I do it. I get a lot more satisfaction out of a spike at 25 yards than a 4-pointer at 400.

    Last year I passed up a number of big bucks during the regular season while carrying scoped cartridge guns. Okay. I screwed them up. Though I saw the bucks well within range of my scoped guns, I simply couldn't pass up the stalk to get closer, and I blew it somewhere along the way. At the same time, I'm really proud of the nice 3-pointer I took during the primitive season, because I saw him at 450 but finally managed to shoot him an hour and a half later at 50. I would have missed out entirely on all the fun and close range action if it had been regular season and I had popped him when I first saw him with my 7 mag.

    The test of a muzzleloading hunter's love of the sport is whether or not he uses his ML scoped or not during the regular season, in spite of a closet full of conventional guns. The vast majority only shoot ML during the primitive season, and only use a ML for access to more hunting time rather than a true love of the old way of hunting. The close range requirements are why it's called a primitive hunting season, and in my mind for that brief period each year the ban on scopes requires everyone to actually use their stalking skills to get close rather than reaching way out there for their shots. Putting scopes on ML's during the primitive seasons would pretty much defeat the whole purpose, as far as I can see.

  14. #14

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    Well buddy I am right with you on all of that. I have read some of the mags out here and was just bewildered with a digital scope that had come out. what is it comming to.

    I think people have lost sight of one thing, it is called HUNTING not killing. some of my most memorable hunts did not result in a kill, but I got to see nature and see the critter in action. He was just better than me that day. I know where he is and were are both smarter now.

    It is like you said about the closeness of it all. True most anyone can take a scoped centerfire rifle and shoot a deer or what ever at 200+ yards away, but when you get that big boy in your kitchen at spitting distanse and he does not know you are there, you have acomplished something then.

    let one of those keyboard hunters get a good buck inside of 15 yards, he couldent control himself. You learn the patients from being out in the wood doing it, not reading about it. trial and era is the only true way to learn it for your self.

    I have really enjoyed this disscussion. I am teaching my kids the old ways like my grandfather taught me. Hate to see it die off.

    Whit

  15. #15

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    you're not one of the few.

    I picked up a double percussion shot gun last winter for turkey hunting down south.

    Just ordered two kit's in 10 gauges flint lock fowlers for next years turkey trip and plan on, hopefully by winter of 08 (my summers are spoken for right now), to be build double barrel flintlock shotguns.

    When it comes to big game, it's a longbow or a camera.

  16. #16

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    I prefer the traditional ML firearms also for hunting and target. Still able to use the open iron sights with corrective lenses but after 45 yrs of shooting it is definitely getting harder.
    I build my own rifles from scratch, or should say from the stump up, cut the trees, run a saw mill and do the building using home made parts and boughten parts. I do the engraving and carving, then shoot the game, cure the meat etc. Gave up doing the taxidermy years ago when a base commander suggested I do something a little less smelly in the housing.

    These two are of a Percussion 54 Cal Modena Hawken the original was built in 1833
    This is a Flintlock 50 Cal Bucks Co.

  17. #17

    Default Jmckenny

    Jmckenny

    Those are some beautiful rifles. You should be very proud of the work you have done on them.

    Whit

  18. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by whitlock View Post
    Jmckenny

    Those are some beautiful rifles. You should be very proud of the work you have done on them.

    Whit
    Thank you for the compliment Whit and I am.

  19. #19

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    Dandy work, and great to see them still being shot. Know what you mean about aging eyes. Just got some new glasses and went shooting yesterday. Probably the best job of accurizing a rifle I've ever seen.

  20. #20

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    beautiful pieces JM! Are you in fairbanks? If so I'm interested in engraving and carving part. I'm also building a couple of single barrel fowlers. Hopefully going to get into doing doubles. Havent engraved or carved of any kind. If ya dont mind point a guy in the right direction.

    Dan
    tradbow@hotmail.com

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