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Thread: Can you still catch fish with milky, cloud eggs?

  1. #1
    Member Zissou's Avatar
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    Default Can you still catch fish with milky, cloud eggs?

    I was down at the eklutna tailrace with my parents, set them up a bit with some spinners until a really nice guy (on his way out) handed us the last of his eggs. It was the stuff you get from the fridge, I forget what it's called exactly (pro something?) but as soon as it hits the water it goes milky white in less than a few minutes. Literally after five or so drifts with a bobber it looked like a piece of decaying, pink flesh, almost completely white all the way through, not appetizing at all. So I watched some others using eggs, and their eggs stayed nice and orange for a very long time. I imagine this has something to do with the cure?

    Anyway, I didn't have any faith in them and I started to wonder if you can still catch fish with such a batch. We switched back to spinners less than an hour later.

    As far as the eklutna tailrace, it was slow. The after work crowd showed up around 6pm (we got there at 3:30) and we had only seen four fish (fat and silver) picked up the entire time we were there. When we left there were well over 30-40 people. My dad hooked two fish, his first pickup got off as soon as it was on, and the second was foul hooked so we let it go asap. We were there for about four hours and that was all the action we saw on our end.

  2. #2
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    Default Scrambled Eggs...

    I have hit fish on bright and on cloudy eggs in unseen depths. I am of the opinion it's an olfactory stimulation, and that the scent is a contributor to the pick-up.

    I have also used both egg presentations in a visual setting and have experienced little difference in watching the fish pick either up.

    Scrambled, eh?

    http://www.alaskanauthor.com

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    Member flyfishak30's Avatar
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    Default Can you?

    YES!!!!!!!!!

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    Default

    The cure used on those eggs is likely the reason for the reaction. Some cures are specifically designed to "milk out" very quickly. Amerman's egg cure is famous for this. I can only get about 3 to 4 cast from eggs cured with Amerman's salmon cure. ProCure Wizard will do the same.

    The reason for the quick milking action is to get as much salmon egg oil into the water as quickly as possible to provoke a strike. However, once the salmon egg oil has milked out, the eggs will be white/pink. These cures are great when you know exactly where the fish are located. Cast those eggs in front of a big Chinook and you'll likely get a quick strike.

    However, those same eggs perform poorly if you don't know where the fish are located. If the fish aren't located in the pool you happen to be fishing, you will be going thru lots of eggs with no hope of getting a strike. If you aren't sure if fish are present in a particular hole, my advice is to either use eggs that don't milk out quickly (borax based cures) or use hardware (spinners/spoons) until you get a strike or see them jumping/rolling. Once you know that fish are present, switch to eggs that milk out quickly.

    Good luck.

  5. #5

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    Eggs that are casted and drift fished tend to get beat up pretty quickly and will only last a couple of casts before they need to be replaced. Eggs that are boondogged also tend to last about one drift before a rebaiting is needed.

    Eggs behind a diver, or backbounced can last a good long time - usually until a fish hits them, or the fisherman jerks them off of the rod (thinking it's a bite while backbouncing).

    As others have stated, different cures will have different milking effects on the eggs.

    I've caught many a fish on milky, or close to milked-out eggs. As long as there are some eggs on your hook, you're probably fine. Once the eggs break free and you're left with just a white/pink boogery skein looking dangly thing on your hook, it's time to change baits.

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    King smolts, small dollies, and small rainbows will hit (nibble) the milked out eggs. These however, are seen as a pest or a nuisance while silver salmon fishing.

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    Default he might have froze them before curing

    That will also result in eggs not maintaining color for long and milking out really fast. Eggs should be cured before freezing.

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    Member SoggyMountain's Avatar
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    Default

    I never cured my eggs at all, but they always caught fish even when I thought they looked ugly.

    I'm very partial to fresh roe with an egg loop. Lasts forever. Looks like crap, but will last longer than the Energizer Bunny.

  9. #9
    Member Zissou's Avatar
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    I figure a bit of yarn and corky goes a long way in keeping the 'look' while the eggs give off the smell eh?

  10. #10

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    [quote=Cohoangler;136367]If the fish aren't located in the pool you happen to be fishing, you will be going thru lots of eggs with no hope of getting a strike. [quote]

    Wow. No kidding. Couldn't resist cohoangler. This just seems a little to obvious.

  11. #11
    Member SoggyMountain's Avatar
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    I never bothered with yarn or a corky.... but, in retrospect, the piece of yarn is not a bad idea. I'll try that in the future if I ever fish in areas open to roe again.

    Mine was a simple setup. Fresh (including frozen) roe on an egg loop beneath an egg sinker. - a piece of red/orange yarn might have made it better.

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