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Thread: Burbot?

  1. #1

    Default Burbot?

    Anyone set a line for burbot this time of year? I've heard of people setting a line through the ice, but never really heard of it happening during the summer/fall. I was thinking of using 2 large weights with the line of hooks between them and then just tying line off to a tree or stump. Is that how you'd go about it?

  2. #2
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    Default I do it.

    I use a milk jug and old line. Usually use whatever meat scraps were left over for dinner. Raw beef, pork, fish parts all work great. I use just enough weight to keep them on bottom to place the set, then prepare to chase them with a boat in the morning. Burbot tend to be night feeders.

  3. #3

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    Double check the regs for the area you are in, they vary quite a bit. I know in the Tanana valley setlines cant be used in any lakes during summer. And there are some other areas in the state that the lines have to be attended at all times.
    The best way to catch burbot in the summer is with rod and reel. The best setup is a 2oz sinker with a 24" leader and a 3/4" hook baited with baby lampreys about 4-6" long.

  4. #4

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    where do you target fish? Deep holes? Creek mouths? I would also like to catch burbot in the warmer months.

  5. #5

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    The best places are at the confluence of clear waters and silt rivers. Fishing for burbot in summer is not real exciting and it can easily turn into an afternoon nap with the kids or a beer drinking contest with a few friends.

  6. #6

    Default Tried it

    Got to try it out and got a couple...Then came the cleaning part. I filleted one of them but that took FOREVER. Gutting was of course way easier. How do you generally clean them? I like to fillet everything, but enless there's a secret, I don't see myself doing that with the burbot. Looking forward to cooking them up this week.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by LastSplash View Post
    .....The best way to catch burbot in the summer is with rod and reel. The best setup is a 2oz sinker with a 24" leader and a 3/4" hook baited with baby lampreys about 4-6" long.
    Where/when/how do you get your baby lampreys?

  8. #8
    Member akjw7's Avatar
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    Default

    haven't done too many but I think it's pretty easy to fillet them - F&G has a pamphlet on it, but I don't remember the technique they describe.

    You basically only get the top half of the fillet on the front half of the fish (just like a ling cod) because of the way the ribs are. Maybe there is another way that yields more meat, but we just fillet as normal except only from the top down to the midline of the fish for the front half (if you can visualize that!), once back about halfway you poke the knife all the way through and get the rest of the fillet in a normal fashion. Don't cut through the tail and instead just flip the fillet over and skin it right there. Then do the other side. No gutting needed - pretty quick easy fillets ready for the lobster treatment.

  9. #9

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    You can find baby lampreys in mud banks. They burrow in them and leave little holes in the mud to get them just dig up the mud and throw them in a bucket. I always found them in the mud bar behind Alaskaland (Pioneer Park) up here in Fairbanks.

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    Member big_dog60's Avatar
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    Default

    Lampreys are easiest to find in spring shrotly after the thaw they come out of the mud and are in small creeks. at that time it is pretty easy to catch lots of them.

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    Default

    im assuming you are fishing these little eels alive? Is that legal?

  12. #12
    Member big_dog60's Avatar
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    I don't think it is legal to use live bait in alaska.
    I don't know if that is what was being suggested or not. I just know you can catch hundreds of lampreys in spring if you wanted to.

  13. #13

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    For clarifiation the eels are dead when used for bait. Even if they are alive when you get to your fishing hole as soon as you jab the hook through them they die.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by LastSplash View Post
    You can find baby lampreys in mud banks. They burrow in them and leave little holes in the mud to get them just dig up the mud and throw them in a bucket. I always found them in the mud bar behind Alaskaland (Pioneer Park) up here in Fairbanks.
    I've read that they run in the Susitna and even the Kenai Rivers, but they clearly run the Yukon in heavier numbers.

    I've never found them down here, but then, I've never dug for them, either.

    Any other words of wisdom other than in mud banks?

    Maybe on the downstream side of islands? Above high water mark? Below high water mark? How deep in the mud are they? Do the telltale pockmarks in the mud last, as if they have to breath like clams?

  15. #15

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    Only ever found them in mudbars, you have to dig down to the water table which isnt far on a river. All I know about the little buggers is that the juveniles burrow in the mud for protection and food, apparently they leave the mud for open water when they are around 3"-6" long.

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    Member big_dog60's Avatar
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    I used to catch them every spring in meadow creek. I was told that they come out of the mud every spring. But they may be adults since they were about 3 to 6 inches long.

  17. #17
    Member akjw7's Avatar
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    live bait? No one has used nightcrawlers with the kids at delong lake? I thought the live bait ban was specifically on using live "fish" for bait - have to look it up I guess!

  18. #18

    Default skinning burbot

    I always skinned them first before filleting. I would make a shallow cut just enough to cut through the skin around the base of the head (not too deep because when you start pulling the skin, the deeper you are, the more likely you are to start pulling the meat with it), then another shallow cut down one side of the middle of the back (same as where you would cut to filet). I would then take a pair of needle nose pliers and grip the skin at the base of the head and pull it off. It usually took the one side off and then I would do the other. Now all you have left is CLEAN meat that you filet off. Real easy. Sometimes the pulling of the skin will need a little muscle, but works pretty slick.

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by big_dog60 View Post
    I used to catch them every spring in meadow creek. I was told that they come out of the mud every spring. But they may be adults since they were about 3 to 6 inches long.
    Nope those are the juveniles an adult lamprey is normally over 16".

  20. #20
    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
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    Default

    I never had any idea lampreys lived in the interior waterways. For some reason I thought they lived in salt water and fell off salmon once they came in fresh water.

    Has anyone ever found one on any fish besides salmon?

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