Results 1 to 19 of 19

Thread: Hunting Cabin Going for a SWIM

  1. #1

    Default Hunting Cabin Going for a SWIM

    NO cat, dozer back hoe ETC. How would ya slide 1100 sq. ft. back to drier ground and then lift her up on tubes? Or do I yard this winter the afore mentinoned monstrosity 20 mile's up??

    Louie

  2. #2
    Member BucknRut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    The BEGINNING of the road!
    Posts
    1,137

    Talking get your hammer and cat's paw out...

    and start pulling nails! Reassemble at new location. You could put it on floats where it's at. Pull all the windows, jack it up to put on skids and wench it. What kind of incline are we talking here? Sounds impossible, but I have seen a lot larger complexes moved...of course, they had access to larger equipment too.

    Give us some more info...

  3. #3
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    5,766

    Default I'm no construction guy, but...

    Perhaps you could jack it up and get some logs underneath? If you can do that, I'd maybe put some timbers lengthwise (pointing the direction of pull) and then place logs across the timbers to use as rollers, and winch it to where you're going, moving the rollers and timbers as you go. Won't work too well if you have to go uphill much, but perhaps it could get you far enough?

    You could also jack it up and put it atop pilings.

    Okay, I'm done making an idiot of myself, now how about you carpenters out there?

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  4. #4
    Member sayak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Central peninsula, between the K-rivers
    Posts
    5,788

    Talking But where...

    Quote Originally Posted by BucknRut View Post
    ... jack it up to put on skids and wench it....
    ... would he find that many willing females?

  5. #5
    Mark
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by alaskalouie View Post
    NO cat, dozer back hoe ETC. How would ya slide 1100 sq. ft. back to drier ground and then lift her up on tubes?....
    Railroad track jacks or house jacks. There are also some real heavy duty "come along) winches out there.

    ....Or do I yard this winter the afore mentinoned monstrosity 20 mile's up??...
    By the time you acquire (rent? buy?) the needed hand tackle to do it, it might be easier to prep it in the fall, walk a dozer out to it in mid winter, and put it where you want that way. Dozers are under $300 per day, delivered (but if you drop it through the ice, I suspect the costs go up from there).

    It doesn't solve your problem of jacking it back up to level and building another foundation under it, though.

  6. #6
    Member BucknRut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    The BEGINNING of the road!
    Posts
    1,137

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sayak View Post
    ... would he find that many willing females?
    Good catch sayak! It's can be quite funny when someone makes a mistake that makes (some)"sense"...I mean, it could happen, I suppose!

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Strahan View Post
    Perhaps you could jack it up and get some logs underneath? If you can do that, I'd maybe put some timbers lengthwise (pointing the direction of pull) and then place logs across the timbers to use as rollers, and winch it to where you're going, moving the rollers and timbers as you go. Won't work too well if you have to go uphill much, but perhaps it could get you far enough?

    You could also jack it up and put it atop pilings.

    Okay, I'm done making an idiot of myself, now how about you carpenters out there?

    -Mike
    Not so idiot Michael, that is exactly what I was thinking, only you were thinking of using a winch and I was thinking of using a wench. In all seriousness, this does work. It would take a good powerful winch with any serious incline, but it can be done with a pulley system. We moved a small cabin by this method using utility poles, it worked great. Fasten the skids to the bottom of the cabin or you will lose them.

  7. #7
    Member Rick P's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer Alaska
    Posts
    2,339

    Default

    Without seeing the site it's hard to tell but a combo of Jacks block and tackle and disassemble should work. You'd be amazed what can be done with simple tools and a little know how! Keep in mind that the ancient Egyptians moved 10 ton granite blocks before the wheel was even invented.

    Although if you don't have any rigging experience disassembly and then reassemble at new site is probably your best bet.

  8. #8
    Member sayak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Central peninsula, between the K-rivers
    Posts
    5,788

    Default Right....

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick P View Post
    Without seeing the site it's hard to tell but a combo of Jacks block and tackle and disassemble should work. You'd be amazed what can be done with simple tools and a little know how! Keep in mind that the ancient Egyptians moved 10 ton granite blocks before the wheel was even invented.
    ... OK, bring on the Hebrew slaves.

  9. #9
    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Ketchikan, AK
    Posts
    4,076

    Default Sayak,

    That's priceless!

    kingfisherktn

  10. #10
    Member BucknRut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    The BEGINNING of the road!
    Posts
    1,137

    Default nice...

    Quote Originally Posted by sayak View Post
    ... OK, bring on the Hebrew slaves.
    haha...I was just going to offer up the football team (and cheerleaders if need be)! Where is this floating cabin located?

  11. #11
    Member Rick P's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer Alaska
    Posts
    2,339

    Default

    Ya know Sayak I thought you and I had at least reached a point were we had respect for each other, sadly I seem to have been mistaken. You should watch a timber framing crew sometime, I've participated in placing main beams that weighed well over a ton with nothing more than a A frame a block and tackle and 4 guys. With an experienced group of riggers 4 guys could get that cabin to do pirouettes.

    BTW you don't think the builders of the Sistine chapel Had cranes and heavy equipment either do you? And the workers who built the Pyramids were volunteers not slaves

  12. #12
    Member sayak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Central peninsula, between the K-rivers
    Posts
    5,788

    Default Hey Rick-

    Lighten up! It was a joke son.

    I know that people can do wonders with jacks/block&tackle/come-along, etc.

    My great uncle built a huge log lodge and cabins (and skiffs) all by himself at Swan Lake, MT before there was even a road that went through there.

    As for the builders of Egypt's pyramids being volunteers... well that is speculation ( I saw the History Channel show too).

  13. #13
    Member Rick P's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer Alaska
    Posts
    2,339

    Default

    Hi Sayak
    Glad you responded, winter is on it's way and I'd hate too think our debates were over.(still want to return to our discussion about the spark of the divine)Guess this summer still has me on edge, I apologize for having a bit of a short fuse with you or anyone else I may have been less than kind with. As too the builders of the pyramids being volunteers from what I've read about the discovery of Imhotep's tomb and the discovery of the workers buried at the site of the great pyramid I have too side with the Egyptologists on this one.(I never saw what the discovery Chanel had too say, no TV got rid of the thing when they did the homage too Treadwell)

    Long and short of it is people are capable of great things, we can move mountains and have for thousands of years so moving one cabin is doable. If I've learned anything in my life it's never underestimate the power of the human mind.

  14. #14
    Member RainGull's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    The S.E. of the N.W.
    Posts
    950

    Default

    "never underestimate the power of the human mind. "

    Ahh, Jedi mind tricks...also a good idea!
    Science has a rich history of proving itself wrong.

  15. #15
    Member junkak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    727

    Default

    Have been involved in moving several cabins due to erosion of the Big Su shoreline.

    Pretty much like Michael Strahan mentioned - jack em up, get some nice clean logs underneath. Using block and tackle, come-alongs, and even a couple four wheelers we were able to roll these cabins approx 100 foot up a small incline.

    Once we started up the incline we half buried some logs for our "cabin rollers" to travel on.

    Was very labor intensive. Most important thing is to make sure the travel path is clean/free of any kind of resistance. Including packing bog holes with logs and packing dirt on top.

    Whatever you decide be sure to stabilize your door jams and windows. A simple 2x4 nailed across the corners works well.

    Good luck on whatever method you decide.

  16. #16
    Mark
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick P View Post
    .....As too the builders of the pyramids being volunteers from what I've read about the discovery of Imhotep's tomb and the discovery of the workers buried at the site of the great pyramid I have too side with the Egyptologists on this one......
    I think it's more revisionist history, myself:

    .....The key to Hawass' reinterpretation of the pyramids was provided by excavations at a nearby site, which appears to be the village or encampment where the people who worked to build the pyramids lived. Evidence from this site suggests that the living conditions of the pyramid laborers were better than many people had assumed. They evidently had their families with them, their diet was more varied than had been expected, and there are even signs that they were provided with medical care. Thus, Hawass and others argue, the pyramid laborers cannot have been slaves—their living conditions were too good for slaves.....
    Revising history has become an industry in itself.

    Even in the pre American Civil War South, slaves were fed and given basic medical attention.

    I wonder if we can start revising that history based on Hawass' reinterpretation?

    .....With one stroke, the Egyptian pharaohs are thus cleared of millennia of libelous charges. Far from being slavemasters, they were noble leaders of a grateful people. In this most recent special, Hawass and others conjured up images of dedicated pyramid workers organizing themselves into teams, cheerfully competing to see who could move the great blocks of stone faster. Though there was occasional talk of people being conscripted into the job, one almost got the feeling that the pyramids were built by willing volunteers, in some early form of community service, perhaps called Habitat for Pharaohs.

    I am not an Egyptologist, and thus I would not presume to enter into a debate involving the serious examination of archaeological data. But as an amateur, I can detect signs of someone having an ideological axe to grind in interpreting this data. All we now know is that the people who worked on the pyramids were fed and to some extent cared for.....
    I agree with Cantor, and in every way:

    ....And Keynes is right—no free market would ever produce a pyramid—unless, as in Las Vegas, it housed a profitable hotel and an even more profitable casino. The free market has an annoying habit of producing goods that people actually desire and want to consume. It might even produce two railways from London to York if there were sufficient demand to justify the investment—and lower the price for travelers as a result of the competition.

    But Keynes wouldn't want something like that to happen. He prefers to turn matters over to the government and let it produce things that nobody wants—and at as extravagant a cost as possible. Keynes's preference for pyramids over railways is emblematic of statist thinking in general—he values the static over the dynamic; he champions monuments to state power over enterprises that might actually get ordinary people where they want to go.

    Thus, as much as I myself admire the Egyptian pyramids—I never miss the latest Discovery or History Channel special on Imhotep—I get nervous when someone starts praising the society that produced them. If Keynes liked the pyramids, there had to be something wrong with them, and indeed there seems to be a connection between liking the pyramids and liking Big Government.

    Just think of how many government activities take the form of pyramid schemes: Social Security, the National Debt, the Federal Reserve System (and let's not forget that pyramid in the Great Seal of the United States and hence on the back of the dollar bill)....
    Whoever built those pyramids were slaves to the Pharoahs, whether they were Hebrew or not, and whether they knew it or not.

  17. #17

    Default

    Just like we are slave to our government and don't know it. All peoples are slaves that pay taxes to support politicians wages and welfare.

    The only freeman is the one that lives off the land and does not use money. I don't think that there are many of those in America.

    Back to moving the building all the info you need is here and should not be a hard task just lots of work. Call all your friends and make a big party of it, that is how it was done in the past.

    Post a call to arms here, get the beer and see what happens.

    Cheers,

  18. #18
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    5,766

    Default I'll help

    Quote Originally Posted by alaskamokaiman View Post
    Just like we are slave to our government and don't know it. All peoples are slaves that pay taxes to support politicians wages and welfare.

    The only freeman is the one that lives off the land and does not use money. I don't think that there are many of those in America.

    Back to moving the building all the info you need is here and should not be a hard task just lots of work. Call all your friends and make a big party of it, that is how it was done in the past.

    Post a call to arms here, get the beer and see what happens.

    Cheers,
    Okay, I'll bite. If you are up to it, how about a work party to make this happen? Might be fun!

    Count me in, if we have enough help and it the cabin is accessible! Time's a' wastin' though! Let's git 'er done!

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  19. #19
    Member BucknRut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    The BEGINNING of the road!
    Posts
    1,137

    Default Where is this thing located?

    I think there would be a lot of guys interested in helping out just for the experience. Can't hurt to make and open invite. If I don't have to drive across the state, I'd be glad to lend a hand!

    -Buck

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •