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Thread: Citric Acid

  1. #1

    Exclamation Citric Acid

    Does anyone know of a recipe for citric acid when it comes to mixing powder/water for care of your meat after the kill? Help any help would be great. Thanks

  2. #2
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Default Mix

    1 OZ of Citric Acid to 1QT of clean drinkable water. Mix and spray game meat.

    Steve

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    What does the citric acid do - help keep flies off?

  4. #4

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    Yes,it helps to keep the flys and bugs off the meat. Thanks for the info steve.

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    Member Daveintheburbs's Avatar
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    I go 2 oz to the quart. It is great for keeping surface bacteria at bay, but has absolutely no effect on flies based on my observations.

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    Member sharksinthesalsa's Avatar
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    Default black pepper

    i've used black pepper too.....it keeps flies off but it probably doesn't do much for bacteria...plus it makes moose meat smell really good...the best thing is to have a good meat pole with a bug net and tarp over it but still allows air flow. that lets the meat get a "case" on it which protects it against outside elements......i've kept caribou this way for two weeks in over 80 degree weather and it kept fine.....there is an old saying in the butcher shops that meat isn't good until there is mold growing on it.....once it gets the green mold on it it aged very well....all you have to do is cut the "case" off and the meat inside is the most tender you will ever eat

  7. #7
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    Citric acid retards bacteria growth; that's all. The correct game bags prevent flies from shooting eggs through the material and into the meat. other products that slow bacteria growth:

    -Vinegar.
    -Strong salt/water solution.
    -The natural glaze that develops over the meat as it dries in a cool place with lots of air movement. However, sometimes the meat does not glaze on cuts, wounds, etc., and bacteria can grow there, and before the glazing takes place flies can get to it.

    Black pepper may at times prevent flies from getting all over the meat, but it won't stop flies. The proper game bags do that. Citric acid is a very strong substance, and it would probably repel flies sometimes, but I would not rely on citric acid to stop flies.

  8. #8

    Default Bug Gaurd

    Cosco
    1=1 gallon jug of lemon juice.
    1=Magnum bottle of Tabasco sauce.
    1+small spray bottle

    Pour just enough off the 1 gallon jug of lemon (into your Margaritta) juice to fit the whole bottle of Tab. in its place. Reseal cap and duct tape till ya get where you need it.

    Shake well and pour in the spray bottle and hose the meat down, repeat on days to follow or until dark crust forms, It has never failed me.

    Now at AK mill and feed there is a product called golden malarin it is a horse barn fly attratant and killer.

    Take some scraps away from meat pole use a dark trash bag (acts like a oven) make a little TP over the top. The little devils crawl in for a taste and never leave. Change out the tent (fly dead) every couple of days so the next customer gets a chance. I have seen it kill by the hundreds. Caution: when your done burry or burn the remnents! And watch fido does not get into it!

    Louie

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    Default No! No! No!

    Sorry, I visit this site often but rarely if ever reply. I'm a nimrod, ya know, one who chooses to do most everything alone. I prefer to hunt,fish,and work alone, usually. Don't get me wrong. I get along with others. It's just that I have learned to do without much help from others. Whith that being said. I learned to Brain tan Skinns, Pelts, and Hides. I learned this method from my Uncle Dick Rocks of Salt Lake city, Utah. An unlikely place for such an adept Hunter and preservers of such memories like, being able to read the life history in the scarrs you learn to read in the fleshed and dehairede hide of a Bear scarred Bull moose taken in the Yukon, or a Grain fed yung buck muley in Central Utah with scarrs from barbed wire on the belly or back, yung or old, depending on when the fence went up during the animals life.
    O.K. I've kina explained my background in the mattewr of the taking of game, hides and the preservation of the memories and olso the history of the game.
    Sorry once again for the rambling tangent but to answer your questions. No! I have never used Citric, or salt, I tried Pepper once but found that the desert Juniper provided a much better solution for the situation. you see, flies don't like juniper oil.
    Here in Alaska though we don't have Junipers and I don't know of any plant other than Yarrow which helps but is also good for maskitto repelant. I will always place my bets on Field care! Yes, Field care. Like I said, I Braintan for personal use, it's a pride thing. I first try to honer the gift of life this animal is is to give me by planning and making a well placed shot, or several if that is what is called for. I then concentrate on the skinning of the kill. No Steaks, Roasts, and or Blood on the hide if can be avoided. fold up hide till you get to camp, then unfold and stake out or some how stretch out your hide. Skinn side up. I'll say it again. Skinn side up. let all surfices of the hide dry. when ready to moove or if rain threatens your Cache of meat, you have a ready made cover, the dried hide. Only now you cover the meat haire side up. Allow your meat to air dry, all surfaces. If skinned propperly the flesh of the animal will have a good shielding layer of membrain taken from the hide, not having to remove it from the hide in another step, well, nuff said abut that.
    If I use anything on a hide it would be a good Yucca wash/bath or good old 20 Mule team borax, It washes out easily and allows for a clean path for the chemicals provided by the Brain of the animal to penitrait all the way through the entire hide.
    Rember, any fat not scraped off the hide could burn that part of the hide. Most, if not all of the fat should be left on the flesh not the hide. Good bags are also a nessesity. Check the meat often, inside and out of the bag. I choose to eat the more suseptibal meats first. ie. around the bulett hole etc.
    Allow air circulation and try to keep the skinn or membrain casing around the meat from getting wet, if it does, dry it off as soon as possible.
    O.K I quit! hope this helps and doesn't get me in hot water with you all?

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Daveintheburbs View Post
    I go 2 oz to the quart. It is great for keeping surface bacteria at bay, but has absolutely no effect on flies based on my observations.
    Dave,
    Would an ounce be eqivalent to a TB (tablespoon) measure? I can't imagine a scale that would measure an ounce, maybe the acid comes with a measure of some kind?

  11. #11
    Member jakec5253's Avatar
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    Default game saver

    I have had good luck with the gamer saver powder. It is a powder that you mix with water in a spray bottle, then spray it on the meat or game bag, or both. There are also directions to pre-treat your bags prior to the hunt. I buy it at Wal-mart, but you can get it at indian valley meats too. I think it is around 3 dollars per packet, and one is more than enough for a caribou. I like how easy it is to use, and saves the time/trouble of making up your own mix.


    Jake

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    Member Daveintheburbs's Avatar
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    chicade,
    I have a cheap postal scale bought on E-bay that goes from .2oz to 35 lb. Great for sheep hunt planning. As a swag I show 2TBS to be roughly an oz.
    Jake,
    Keep supporting Doug. He is a great guy. Pretty sure main ingredient in his powder is good old citric though. It is handy to have a small pre sealed package.

  13. #13
    Supporting Member AFHunter's Avatar
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    Default lemon juice works also

    All you need is 1 cup of lemon juice to one quart of water. Easier to just pick it up at the grocery store than drive to five different hunting stores to see who is carrying the product you want in powder form.

  14. #14
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    Our pilot and also a couple of natives in Dillingham told me their families have been tossing meat bags into the lake for LOTS of years. When I first heard it I was skeptical but the more I thought about it the better it sounded. Especially after watching every single fly in Alaska swarm the meat bags for hours. When I thought about the fact that this was day 2 of our hunt and we still had several days before the pilot would be back for a meat pickup we removed the meat from the original bags, washed it off completely, put it in clean bags and tossed it into the water.

    The water temp instantly cools the meat, the outer layer of meat hardens up preventing water from permeating the entire piece and we never, ever, ever had to worry about whether the citric acid mixture is correct. I know there is some concern about bacteria in the water but I think there is a much larger risk of something bad happening to the meat by leaving it in the open air, especially if the weather is warm.

    We've used this procedure with the meat from several caribou over a three year period and haven't had a single problem. The butcher back home was curious as to what we had done with our meat in the field and he told me he only had to remove a thin layer of meat from the outside and the rest was in perfect condition with absolutely no spoilage evident.

    Another benefit to this method was made evident when a bear wandered through camp and then along the shore. He actually stepped on the ropes we were using to anchor the bags and looking at his tracks, he never even hesitated. Try that with the meat laying out in the open.

    It tasted great and not one of us barfed after eating it.

  15. #15

    Default Water Storage

    Bookseller,

    I take it that you are putting the meat in cloth bags and submerging them versus plastic bags. I've heard of people putting the meat in a garbage bag and mostly, put not completely submerging the bag (so no water gets in throught the top). It sounds like you are not even trying to keep the lake/river water off the meat?

  16. #16
    Member Fuse's Avatar
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    Default Weights & Measures

    Quote Originally Posted by chicade View Post
    Dave,
    Would an ounce be eqivalent to a TB (tablespoon) measure? I can't imagine a scale that would measure an ounce, maybe the acid comes with a measure of some kind?

    According to the old grandpa sheet of equivalents I have on my fridge - 1 fluid ounce is two Tablespoons. Hope it helps.

    Fuse

  17. #17
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    Cloth bags only. I don't think I'd ever use a plastic bag on meat unless it was to put it in the freezer and the outside of the bag said "Zip Lock".

    Turn the bags for the first 12 hours or so and put the meat in clean dry bags for transport and it'll be fine and yes, the bags are completely submerged.

  18. #18
    Member mmusashi2k's Avatar
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    Citric acid is great stuff. Mix it strong and mist it on meat and game bags to keep flys from landing or laying eggs. After seeing flys around everyones game bags but mine, everyone I hunt with wants what's left of my citric acid. Given that flys shouldn't be able to lay eggs through good game bags it still makes me feel better while dressing game and I sure don't miss having them around.

  19. #19
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    Default Gonna try it on the next one.

    This has been a great thread. I bought the "Alask Pack" game bags at Fred Meyer and was sorely disappointed in the amount of blow the flies managed to get THROUGH THE BAG. Not to mention how angry I was that that the little demons were swarming camp and my flailing arms couldn't keep them at bay. So since I didn't have a decent game bag I started a small fire close to where my buddies hung the quarters and smoked 'em out. The bag that had backstrap and tenderloins I wrapped with the remnants of a roll of paper towels. Both were pretty effective but it was too little, too late for one of the quarters where the bag had separated enough to let the blow in. I'm not sure what the meat is going to turn out like, but I'm sure it's not going to effect it much. Got it to the processor the next morning before the satanic hoards were awake. Next year I'm double bagging everthing.
    "He who is slow to anger is better than the mighty, and he who rules his spirit is better than he who takes a city." ~ Proverbs 16:32

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