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Thread: Ruger M77 Mk II laminate stocks...

  1. #1
    Member schmidty_dog's Avatar
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    Default Ruger M77 Mk II laminate stocks...

    I recently bought a ruger M77 MkII with the old boat paddle stock on it. I really would like to put either a stock ruger or replacement brand laminate stock on this gun, but I don't want a cheekpiece on it. Any ideas?

    I'm really pumped about this rifle, got a heck of a deal on it and it came with a leupold VXII. Its a 338 Win Mag by the way.

    schmidty

  2. #2

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    check out this site, find what you want in the color you want and get them to mail it to you then fit it, glass it, and finish it. http://rifle-stocks.com/


    Whit

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    Have you checked Cabela's? They've carried that thumbhole stock for a while, and I see that they now have a sporter stock available. I think it's a Boyd's. Want to get one for my M77. Not sure if it has a cheekpiece or not.

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    Default Accurate Innovations

    I'd seriously check this company out. They've got a ton of different options. They often times have stocks that someone ordered but didn't take delivery of and you can also have one made to your specs. You can even combine the brown and grey laminates! You also get a full length aluminum bedding block.

    http://www.accurateinnovations.com/

    Dave
    Last edited by AKWannabe; 08-18-2007 at 21:33. Reason: forgot the link! doh!

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    I have a Ruger 77/22mag that had the boat-paddle stock.

    It shot a 3/8 inch group at 100 yards!

    Any gun that shoots that good deserves to look good too.

    So I trashed that factory stock and put a Richards AAA Exhibition Clara walnut stock on it. WOW!

    http://rifle-stocks.com/

    The boat paddle stock is missing all the bottom metal so I had to order it from Brownells and fit it to the stock.

  6. #6
    Member schmidty_dog's Avatar
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    Default Busted Knee

    Did the stock come finished? I was confused on that site just a little. Do you have to finish the stock once you get it or what? I don't mean fit it, I mean like varnishing the wood.

    schmidty

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    All it needed was a final sanding and finish. IIRC, I had to clear one spot in front of the magazine well so the mag plate would sit flush.

  8. #8

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    Ok by finishing the stock I mean final sanding and on a laminate stock I have always used a polyurethane finish it is hard and holds up good. Sand it very smooth and hit it with a few coats of polyurethane and sand with steel wool between each coats, and then put the final coat on it. It looks pretty sharp and is not hard to do. As for fitting it, they have it 99% ready to go, but you will need to make sure that everything in the action area is fit right, I like glassing it my self, make for no shift fit, I didnít do that one time on a 338 Win Mag and cracked the stock at the range, so I do it every time now. If you are not sure how to get it fitted right, or are nervous about doing your self, just take it to a gun smith and he can fit it for you as well as glass bed it. Not too expensive, and you will really enjoy it. Send me your email and I will send you a few pictures of some that I have done.

    Whit

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    Member schmidty_dog's Avatar
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    So after its glass bedded can I finish the stock, or finish it before and the gunsmith can still work it afterwards. Just curious.

  10. #10

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    I would glass it first, in case you get some of the epoxy on the out side. Then finish it. I have always fitted the action and bedded it before finishing. that way you dont mess up your finish. It is a pain to start all over on the finish.

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    Quote Originally Posted by whitlock View Post
    I would glass it first, in case you get some of the epoxy on the out side. Then finish it. I have always fitted the action and bedded it before finishing. that way you dont mess up your finish. It is a pain to start all over on the finish.
    Definitely ...since you can't strip epoxy, and polyurethane itself is a tough critter to get back off. If you do get some epoxy goop on wood where it doesn't belong, scrape it off right away then sand that area after the epoxy cures. You can use acetone to clean off uncured epoxy, but you risk leaving a 'water mark' on the wood that won't sand off later.

    Brian

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    Member schmidty_dog's Avatar
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    Default Walnut maybe?

    Now I'm starting to lean towards walnut. I like what I have seen and heard about rubbed oil finishes. Supposedly easier to clean up dings and scratches because if there is no finish on top of the oil you can just rub out some of the imperfections rather than stripping the outer finish off. What do you guys think?

  13. #13

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    well i cant knock you for that, I love a pretty piece of wood. you cant beat the way they look that is for sure. there is a little more to a rubed oil finish that you have saied, it is a bit harder to finish a piece of wood than a lamitated stock, the wood will show more inperfections, and there will be a lot more sanding and work involved. you will need to let the stock sit for a couple days to let it dry in between coats, and dont sand it until it is compleatly dry. just take your time with the stock, dont get in a rush and it will turn out fine. make sure you get a good penetrating oil to start of with, and you can also sand the stock to fill it with the wet tong oil. it makes for a better finish. when you get enough oil and sawdust mixed together on the stock rub it in to it with the grain. just a little tip i picked up.

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    Quote Originally Posted by schmidty_dog View Post
    Now I'm starting to lean towards walnut. I like what I have seen and heard about rubbed oil finishes. Supposedly easier to clean up dings and scratches because if there is no finish on top of the oil you can just rub out some of the imperfections rather than stripping the outer finish off. What do you guys think?
    I wonder if the stock would change with changes in humidity. If so, that could change the point of impact with changes in weather. Have you looked into that at all?

    Brian

  15. #15

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    Brian that is one of the downfalls of wood. that is where the glass bedding come in. it helps keep the wood from swelling on the action or barrel. the real wood will always change, that is why you see benchrest shooters do not use them. that is also the reason that they came out with composit and lamiate stocks. not as pretty by any means, but more weather friendly.

    Whit

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    Quote Originally Posted by whitlock View Post
    Brian that is one of the downfalls of wood. that is where the glass bedding come in. it helps keep the wood from swelling on the action or barrel. the real wood will always change, that is why you see benchrest shooters do not use them. that is also the reason that they came out with composit and lamiate stocks. not as pretty by any means, but more weather friendly.

    Whit
    I know ...I've read the articles. My particular experience, mostly in Oregon's rain prior to moving here, was that my wood stocks didn't result in a problem. It could be that I was lucky or that the gun manufacturers know how to mount the hardware so it doesn't place any torque on the barrel or develop new touch points that change the barrel's vibration characteristics or something. Or maybe my shooting's not good enough to show the effect ...which means it's a non-issue. I have no problem hitting a clay target at 250 yards when shooting from a standing position, no support. If the weather effect is less than that, then super. I really don't have any other data on the topic, which by now I would've guessed that somebody I know should've seen a noticeable change with weather and mentioned it. But nobody I know has an oiled stock either, although they look so nice I sometimes think of getting one. I definitely prefer a low- or no-gloss finish, a true matte being my first choice.

    Brian

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    Member schmidty_dog's Avatar
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    I have read a few articles by Chuck Hawks, and it sure is evident he hates synthetic stocks. His views are basically that synthetic stocks are a ploy by gun manufacturers to save money and make a cheaper gun, by selling the points of how weather resistant and tough to abuse synthetic stocks are.

    Synthetic stocks that are injection molded do flex, and that can affect accuracy if you are using a sling to help you shoot, and synthetic stocks can also become very brittle in extreme cold weather and crack or shatter if dropped on say a really hard rock or icy surface.

    How many times has a really good wood or laminate stock actually failed I wonder, as opposed to synthetic stock failures. That would be interesting to know.

  18. #18

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    I have the same rifle and just put a black ramline synthetic on it. It was fairly inexpensive and cut down on weight. It also looks good.

  19. #19

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    This is a stock I just had made for me from MPI, it is for a 300 Win Mag I am building on a Montana 1999 action. It is good looking for a composite stock, and will look better than the plastic looking ones. I have never been a big fan of the composite stock, but in a nasty climate they come in handy. you need to get the stock that you will be happy with if it is a nice piece of wood than go with that, if you are scared of wood because the ice and snow but still want the wood look, go with laminate, or if you like the composite go that way. I have all three of them because I hunt a verity of different climates, but you need to make up your own mine on what you want first. It is more of a personal preference really. You need to look at what you are going to be using it for the most and what climate it will be in then make your dissension.


    Whit
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