View Poll Results: Predator Control

Voters
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  • Yea, Life Long Alaskan

    23 37.10%
  • Nea, Life Long Alaskan

    2 3.23%
  • Yea, Transplant Alaskan

    34 54.84%
  • Nea, Transplant Alaskan

    3 4.84%
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Thread: Predator Contral Survey

  1. #1

    Default Predator Contral Survey

    OK, just wondering how many people are for or against predator control out side of just normal hunting of them.

    Please Yea or Nea for predator control and also add whether or not your a Life long alaskan (Born in alaska) or a transplant (Not born in alaska).

    Just curious.

  2. #2
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    I, for one, think that this issue is far too complex to just give a yes or no answer to. Every instance of proposed predator control is different, with different biological, social, and political factors coming in to play. Alas, that has all been discussed here before.

    Are you referring to a particular unit/species with your poll question?

  3. #3
    Member Rick P's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    I, for one, think that this issue is far too complex to just give a yes or no answer to. Every instance of proposed predator control is different, with different biological, social, and political factors coming in to play. Alas, that has all been discussed here before.

    Are you referring to a particular unit/species with your poll question?
    I agree however I did vote for predator control our wolf are hurting from over population just as much as the Moose. With the collapse of the fur industry some kind of control is needed in order to benefit both species.

    I also don't see how whether you've lived here 20 years or were born here makes any difference. I've met several life long Alaskans who don't even hunt or fish and have no opinion on predator control at all.

  4. #4

    Default Yes

    Who would say no that knows anything. The prey numbers suffer "overall numbers" not just the hunted population, then its time to regulate the predators that are too smart and expensive to shoot. I do my part. Most people don't. I am angry with myself if I don';t get a brownie every year. How many people do you know feel the same way. Everyone wants to shoot the moose and caribou and go home, then do it again the next year. Speaking of unit 13 the need of unit wide control or liberalization like "selling" the pred's is much needed. Born and raised in AK

  5. #5
    Member SoggyMountain's Avatar
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    Default

    Yea and Nea? Lifelong or transplant?

    Like all polls I've seen on this site, the winner is the guy who reads without response.

    The factors are always way bigger than big game populations.

    NewYork has enough deer to choke you, but the "predator" is your car.

    My own opinion is that anyone relying on caribou for meat is that they should kill wolves.... they don't (they would rather the Government do it for them) and griz.

    A caribou is a moss mop. For those that survive on it's weak nutritional value, you deserve better. For the trophy hunter I do not have any feelings for.

    Spend your money for a rack. Buy your wolf tag. And, participate in the economy of meat.

  6. #6
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    My partner feels that no one should be given a Moose or Caribou tag till they bring in five wolf pelts. I agree.

  7. #7
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    Default hot issue

    This is a real hot issue in most parts of the country right now, all I can say is I have seen the before predator control and after in two areas, the Ashaick area north of Whitehorse and the Rocky Mt. trench country in Northern BC. in both cases it is unreal. The Trench is called the Seringetti of the north and until you have hunted that country you wouldn't believe the difference, I was down on the Turnagain last winter feeding horses and trapping it was like being in a game park, herds of elk moose on every hillside stonesheep galore and this is an area where there is ongoing predator control, I saw wolves too.I worked for an outfitter on the Yukon AK border in the early 90s and we would get a late fall run of Caribou that would come over every year from AK not anymore that outfitter cant hunt Caribou anymore he feels strongly that wolves and bears are to blame. Here in Southeast Yukon where I am now there might be 15 moose killed by hunters every year at most as we have no roads and almost no one has thier own plane, yet our moose counts are way down and it just happens that there has been a mass departure of most trappers in this area in the last 5 years due to low fur prices. It has been my experience that most people will let emotion take over on this issue and not use common sense. Wolves don't just kill the weak/sick read Jim Reardons book Alaska Wolf Man. Dave

  8. #8
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    I'm yea and nea, yea to allowing increased opportunities to harvest predetors trapping and sport hunting, nea to bounties, and aerial gunning.
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  9. #9

    Default aerial gunning?

    isn't "aerial gunning" sport hunting and wouldn't that constitute increased opportunity. As I have read the regulations there is almost as much opportunity for the trapper and the ground based hunter as we can get. Unless we start doing like my grandpa used too; pulling the puppies out of the den.

    I say if they need to be shot, shoot-em any way we can. If they dont then dont.

    I think we are so far behind on the preditor control that it will take alot more than what we are doing now to get the balance beam swinging the other way.

  10. #10
    Member lab man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by akdan747 View Post
    isn't "aerial gunning" sport hunting and wouldn't that constitute increased opportunity. As I have read the regulations there is almost as much opportunity for the trapper and the ground based hunter as we can get. Unless we start doing like my grandpa used too; pulling the puppies out of the den.
    No, "aerial gunning" is not sport hunting.

  11. #11
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    lol@gunning...anything with the word "gunning" probably isn't sport.
    i voted yes and life long, but i wasn't born here, but i was still nursing when i moved here, 15 months old, i consider myself an alaskan....
    we stepped into the food chain, its time we really play the role we are able to play in helping moose numbers and controling predator numbers to help to smooth out the eb and flow of cycles.
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  12. #12

    Default "sporting" preditor control

    As it is now we can't keep up with the wolf and bear populations. In unit 13 the wolf season runs 10aug-30apr 10 per day, brown and black bears have no closed season and a person is allowed 1 brown and 3 blacks a year. Preditor control, like law enforcement and war is not supposed to be "sporting". Preditor control is a task that has to be done for everyones benifit. All i'm saying is if it needs to be done lets get it done and get on with things.

  13. #13
    Member bushrat's Avatar
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    Default ridiculous poll question

    No thinking hunter should answer yea or nay to a poll like this. There are way too many variables to consider and each area is unique. I'm just echoing what Brian said, really.

    I think a lot of hunters better wake up to the actual goals of some of the AK pred-control programs that seek irruption densities of prey and hunters to shoot all those moose and caribou. Jake, I think smoothing out the peaks and valleys of wildlife populations is a great management scheme. But that isn't what these pred-control programs in many cases seek to do.

    Asking "Predator Contral [sic] yea or nay?" is like asking "Shoot Cows, yea or nay?" In some areas it may be prudent to shoot cows, and in some areas it may not be. You can't answer until you know the specifics and see what the plan is. The question itself when posed like that is flat-out non-sensical. My .02,

  14. #14
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by akdan747 View Post
    As it is now we can't keep up with the wolf and bear populations.
    What do you mean, we "can't keep up" with them, Dan? Where is it that we can't keep up? Do you mean that the numbers don't appear to be falling, or are you suggesting that the numbers are growing? Just in Unit 13, or do you think this is a statewide problem?

  15. #15

    Default

    I cannot speak to the sitiuation statewide (too big of a state). As far as unit 13, 14, and 16 there are still restrictions on hunting untill those are lifted it is safe too say there is a big game shortage.

  16. #16
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    Default Agreed

    There's too many things to take into consideration. I did vote yea, lifer; but there's another side to my overall opinion.

    In more urban areas and areas that are quasi-rural (like the valley, Talkeetna, Juneau, etc) Poaching isn't taken into consideration because very few folks get caught. When I bought my new house here in Wasilla at the foot of Baldy, my dogs started to appear with moose bones. Further investigation found the carcass in my own back yard! The previous owner had poached a cow and the entire neighborhood was okay with it because of "homestead hunting rights".

    For a game managment plan to be truly effective everything has to work seamlessly; no poaching, accurate counts of predators, accurate counts of prey etc. So ultimately, what will work in one unit is not going to work in another. Take for instance the current controversy in 16 and other units, residents of the units don't like the extra hunters, outside groups and bunny-huggers are offended at the notion of what they view as "bloodthirsty hunters that are cross-eyed and slobbering" pointing guns at everything with fur and no one is happy. Here's where there's an opportunity to do something about that. If there were to be a designated license for predator control and some training in effective hunting of them then you would decrease the failed attempts and increase the successes of trained hunters in the right areas. The bounty idea is a little silly to me; you take your focus off of your goal and sometimes moral motivation for hunting and turn it into something else. This is a complex issue and has many different opinions and science behind the facts and opinions... too much to really go into but this is the essence of my two cents.
    "He who is slow to anger is better than the mighty, and he who rules his spirit is better than he who takes a city." ~ Proverbs 16:32

  17. #17
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by akdan747 View Post
    As far as unit 13, 14, and 16 there are still restrictions on hunting untill those are lifted it is safe too say there is a big game shortage.
    While I don't disagree that there may be too many bears in untils 13 and 16, I don't know about the statement that there is a game shortage simply because there are hunting restrictions. How far do you take this line of thinking without considering human factors? What I am getting at is that there will mostly likely always be "game shortages" in units 13 and 14, as our population keeps growing and most hunters seem to think that they are entitled to their yearly moose. OK, so today there are 10,000 hunters in these units (just making up a number for an example). In 10 years there are 15,000, and in 10 more there are 20,000 hunters. At that point is it still a predator problem, or is it an access/opportunity problem? In the most heavily hunted/easily accessible units, we're going to have to learn to live with the fact that the land simply cannot grow enough moose and caribou to meet the ever-rising demand. (That is, at least not without serious ecological consequences.)

    While predator management is certainly going to be a part of a healthy game population, at a certain point we have to look at managing ourselves as well.

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