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Thread: Snagged? Try this!

  1. #1

    Thumbs up Snagged? Try this!

    After many trips out this summer and watching people do some pretty amazing things to free a snag, I felt obligated to pass this tip along. I watched folks break off lure after lure, snap off rod tips, imbed braided line into itself on the spool, and send freed snags flying back into the crowd (quick duck!!) So...while this may be old news to some of you, the folks I turned on to this VERY simple method were amazed at the results. BTW, an 80 year woman walked up to me at Willow Creek one year, as I was about to break off another snag, and told me her little secret. Merely find an old, but not rotted or waterlogged, piece of wood. About 2-3 inches in diamter seems best, length 6-12" but personal preference. You can also use a short piece of PVC pipe too. Let out some slack line and lay your rod aside or hold out of the way, you don't want any tension on line going to spool or on rod tip. With hands, pull in line until you feel it tight, wrap the remaining slack line around the wood several times (do not lay line on itself) and then in a steady manner, gently pull. Most snags will pull free, and not come flying back at you, or others. If they don't, I have the elder ladies phone number ;-) Hope this works at least once for somebody out there. I've hardly lost a rig using this method. Key is pull gently, don't jerk it. Let me know what you think! Thanks

  2. #2
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    Very good post!

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    Default Great Tip

    I know I will be giving this a try, even though i never snag..

  4. #4

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    will try next time!

  5. #5
    Member FishSean's Avatar
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    I find using the right combination of swear words works about half the time.

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    or you could just your arm
    brad g.
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  7. #7

    Red face LOL Sean

    yes, I must admit, a few cuss words have been heard when this method fails

  8. #8
    Member CanCanCase's Avatar
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    To clarify, I assume this method is for river or shore fishing... I don't have too many pieces of wood drifting handy on the boat, and when you've snagged a 12/0 circle hook on a rock or coral in 2200 feet of water, the straight-up-and-down-dip-slack-and-pull-quickly method seems to work best... and I've NEVER flung said circle hook and 4# lead weight back behind me when doing this...!

    -Case
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  9. #9
    Member Zissou's Avatar
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    What works for me 99% of the time is pointing my rod tip directly at the lure/snag like I was going to a ram a sword through someone's stomach, and just do a steady pull.

    If this intially doesn't work, I change the angle of which I do it by walking upriver or down, but the rod is always straight, pointing at the snag. I've never had it fire the hook back at me, whatever force is generated to shoot back is nullified by the water. Since it's being drawn at such a low angle, it has all that water between you and the rod to fire through, while if you use the typical bend-your-rod-up-til-it-comes-loose technique, it typically has less than a foot or two of water to go through it before it hits air and turns into a missile.


  10. #10
    Member AKFishOn's Avatar
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    Ditto on what Zissou said on removing a snag. If I'm flipping and I snag sometimes when I'm pulling straight back on the line I keep me rod tip a few inches under the water, then you will not send anything flying back. If for some reason you do toss weights and hook(s) back try to conteract but tossing them forward quickly and away from your fishing friends around you. And if you are on a boat and snag, if you can't find a piece of wood to pull your snag out use your club. Unfortunately I don't know where to Halibut fish so I have used this method before and lost gear sometimes doing it.

  11. #11

    Cool CanCanCase

    yes, it is a shore method

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by FishnMan View Post
    yes, it is a shore method
    I have used that method in my boat twice by grabbing my "Fish Bonker" and wrapping the line around that.

  13. #13

    Default antoher method if you are in rocks

    Often if you are snagged in rocks, your lure and weight are just lodged. if you let all the slack out, get as high as possible, lift your rod as high as possible, and give pulls from 3 oclock to 12 oclock it works sometimes. I helped a few people get off the rocks without breaking the line. the weight will fall between the rocks and those pulls can fling it over or through the culprit rocks. (sometimes )
    Hike faster. I hear banjo music.

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    Default Releasing snagged lines

    When casting or flipping in rivers and streams I attach a 3-way swivel to my line. One eye carries my leader with the hook or lure. The third eye has a lighter weight leader to the sinker (the weak link in the system - hopefully I will lose only the sinker, not the more expensive lure if I should become snagged.) Bulky-shaped sinkers can become lodged in cracks betweenand under rocks, where no amount of pulling will dislodge the heavier rocks. A break-off is certain.

    To minimize this I prefer to use the bulk lead wire sinkers that are about 1/4 inch in diameter or even thinner. These will often pull between the rocks and come free, where a fatter sinker would not otherwise pull through the confined space. They sell surgical rubber tubing or woven "chinese finger trap" gadgets with a swivel that you can fit the tubing into to secure the wire sinkers to your line.

    As a cheaper solution, I just cut off the length of lead wire desired, pinch a hole through the end if it with an awl or other sharp point, and attach it to a snap swivel on the end of my "sinker drop line".

  15. #15
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Thumbs up A better way-

    Quote Originally Posted by Dieseldan View Post
    When casting or flipping in rivers and streams I attach a 3-way swivel to my line. ...As a cheaper solution, I just cut off the length of lead wire desired, pinch a hole through the end if it with an awl or other sharp point, and attach it to a snap swivel on the end of my "sinker drop line".
    Dan,

    Here's a cheaper rigging method we used to use for steelhead years ago in Oregon (I know, we don't care how they do it in the Lower 48, but here goes...). Simply cut about an inch or so of surgical tubing, slide it onto your line, and insert a section of the wire lead you mentioned in between the tubing and the line. The tubing grips the lead against your line and also allows the lead to slide if it gets hung up. Most hangups are sinker issues anyway, and if you pull, eventually the tubing / lead slides all the way down to the hook. The hook provides a different pulling angle and that usually does the trick in getting it loose.

    You want to smooth the end of the pencil lead so it doesn't cut your line.

    Might help someone...

    -Mike
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  16. #16
    Member AKFishOn's Avatar
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    Here is another one I saw at Ship Creek. Once a guy snagged a vibrax near the culvert, he took a pepsi can filled it with water and then clipped the can through the tab (with a plastic clip) to his line he then put slack in his line and threw can out past his snag. He used this method three times that night and all three times he got un-snagged. Strange method but I was tossing vibrax next to him and do to the rocky area I lost one that night to a snag.

  17. #17
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    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Strahan View Post
    Dan,

    Here's a cheaper rigging method we used to use for steelhead years ago in Oregon (I know, we don't care how they do it in the Lower 48, but here goes...). Simply cut about an inch or so of surgical tubing, slide it onto your line, and insert a section of the wire lead you mentioned in between the tubing and the line. The tubing grips the lead against your line and also allows the lead to slide if it gets hung up.
    -Mike
    Thanks, Mike. I like it and will definitely try it.

    For those situations where the fishing line is more vertical - such as when fishing in deep water or from a boat - one could carry a hook retreival device such as a few links of small-link chain (or loops of crimped wire cable leader) attached below a heavy sinker. This device would be attached (perhaps by a snap swivel) so that it slides freely down your tight fishing line when lowered by gravity on the end of its separate stout cord.

    The idea is to be able to entangle your hook with the retreiver's links (or loops), and to "knock" the hook free by bouncing or jiggling the weighted chain until it pulls the snagged hook free by inertia (like the slide-hammer principle).

    One might even be able to haul the terminal tackle up with brute force by pulling on the heavier cord, rather than pulling on the weaker fishing line once it has become entangled with the hook(s).

    Dan

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