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Thread: good packs?

  1. #1
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    Default good packs?

    Hello,

    I just joined and am from GA, so please excuse any dumb questions I have about packing out game. We don't do much, if any, packing in here so I figured yall could offer good advice. We only have 9 days in south GA we can kill black bear, but in north GA there is about a month worth of hunting and there is a large national forest there. Most people just park by the road and walk in a couple hundred yards a sit. I was wanting to pack in with a friend, hopefully, or maybe just myself. I was wanting some advice on a good pack that I can pack for up to a week, packing light, and can handle packing out a good size bear.

    Now for the real question, how do you pack out a bear? I know that might sound silly, but I've never done it or heard of anyone that has around here to ask.
    I enjoyed reading the moose packing thread, but didn't want to steal that thread with my questions. I've always said that if I could only afford only one hunt it would be for moose, that's my dream hunt. I'm entering some New England lotteries next year.

  2. #2
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    Default

    Or if you know of a book/dvd/website on the subject I would be interested as that will probably be alot of typing to answer the how-to part of my question.

  3. #3
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Default Pack for bear

    Georgia-

    Welcome to Outdoors Directory!

    You've already read some of the info here on packs, and I would suggest doing a search through the forum archives for more. There are some strong opinions on this subject (except mine, of course ).

    I'm gonna say what I always say to this question- get the Moose Pack from Barney's Sport Chalet!

    As to how to pack out your bear, you want to do that a piece at a time (or several pieces at a time). I know in a lot of places the customary method is to drag the whole animal out of the woods (I used to do that with deer in Oregon years ago). But knowing what I know now, I would cut them up on site and pack them out that way. It's a lot easier than dragging, in my opinion.

    Hope it helps!

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
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  4. #4
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Default Packing

    Welcome to the forum. Asking what the best pack is here will get you many answers. I myself like my Cabella's Alaskan Guide II pack. The pack is light and is stable with a load. A really nice black bear meat and hide with skull will weight close to if not over 100lbs. Here is a photo of my friend packing out my spring black bear and one of me with the hide and skull from my brown bear. You will need some cloth game bags to keep the meat clean. A small tarp or some plastic to lay on the ground helps to keep everything clean. Also so bring something to tie your load down. If you just have to take out the hide and skull thats not so bad. It would be hard to pack out an entire bear and your gear in one load. I have seen many DVDs for skinning, but I can't think of any that covers packing alone.
    Good Luck

    Steve


  5. #5
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    Default

    Thanks for the advice I'll look at those packs, but I just remembered that you have to present the intact bear to the local dnr office so they can take their measurements and check the stomach contents and all that so I'll need a friend to go.
    While I have a couple of responses I was looking at the Alaska fish and game page and saw that a nonresident moose tag is $400. Do any of you know if that and the regular hunting license is all one would need. I just didn't know if you could simply buy the tag and go to public land and bag your moose. I would love the opportunity to get a 40+ moose. There are lotteries in the NE states, but you have to pay to enter and there is no gurantee you'll get a tag ever.

  6. #6

    Default Hauling Bear...

    Hey GA,

    Welcome to the Forum. Have you seen those little wheelie contraptions (two wheels about 14-18" in diameter) with an aluminum frame over the wheels, that people use to haul deer out? That should work for your bear if the bear isn't bigger than 250 pounds or so.

    As for the Alaskan moose tag - the tag is $400 and the hunting license is $85 I believe. 40 inches (without 3 or 4 brow tines, depnding on hunting unit) isn't typically legal for non-residents, the width is 50 inches in most areas.

    Michael

  7. #7
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    Default what mdhunter said

    I also hunt with a cabelas alaskaII frame pack. BUT, if you have to present the whole animal to DNR, packing out a entire bear, will be very difficult on one frame pack. Go buy one of theose deer carts like mdhunter said, I have used those alot hunting down south (TN and MS) and they are sweet little buggies to haul out huge loads!!

  8. #8
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gathumper View Post
    Do any of you know if that and the regular hunting license is all one would need. I just didn't know if you could simply buy the tag and go to public land and bag your moose. I would love the opportunity to get a 40+ moose.
    As another member already stated, a hunting license and moose tag is all you need. That being said, the success rate for guided hunters are far higher than non-resident hunters who don't use a guide. Of course, if you do a lot of pre-hunt research, hunt a good area, and are willing to work hard at it, success is certainly possible.

    As for the 40+ moose, my previous thread about packing moose may have misled you there. In most areas of the state, moose must be 50" or larger, or have 3 brow tines on one side (4 in some areas), or have a single spike or a fork on one side. The 40-45" inch bull that I saw will be legal because he has 3 brow tines on one side. As far as trophy hunters are concerned, most seem to think that 60" or larger defines a truly large moose, but anything that fills my freezer is good enough for me! And heck, a 40" bull would certainly dwarf any whitetail hanging in your friend's garage!

  9. #9
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    Default

    Thanks guys, I hadn't thought about one of those carts. That would be perfect. I was just wondering about the moose. The bear will hopefully happen this fall or the next...the moose is something I've always assumed would have to come later on in life, but other than the plane ticket $485 sounds like a deal to me. I read further on and I believe it says that you have to sign a paper saying that you have to use a qualified guide though. I don't know if you can get by that by showing you have certain skills(map reading, survival, etc). As far as size goes a 40-45" moose would be a trophy to me. I would be as proud of smaller moose than I would a 180 class whitetail(that may be small up there too, haha).

  10. #10
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gathumper View Post
    I read further on and I believe it says that you have to sign a paper saying that you have to use a qualified guide though. I don't know if you can get by that by showing you have certain skills(map reading, survival, etc).
    Nope, there is no guide requirement for moose. In Alaska non-residents have to have a guide (or a resident relative within the 2nd degree of kindred) accompany them for brown/grizzly bear, dall sheep, and goats. You do not need a guide for moose, nor do you have to demonstrate proficiency with hunting skills.

    Do understand, though, that successfully harvesting a moose is not as easy as just hiking off into the woods and taking your pick. Most road-accessible areas are hunted pretty heavily and moose densities are far lower than what the typical whitetail hunter is used to. A skilled and knowledgable hunter can easily spend an entire season afield without seeing a legal bull. Fulfilling your goal of taking a moose is certainly doable, but go into the planning process with realistic expectations. Heading into Alaska with a moose tag in hand is no guarantee of success.

  11. #11
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    Default price of indepent guides

    Do you know what the average cost of a guide would be. Not a outfitter, but a local guy who guides part-time and can offer references.

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