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Thread: 24' saltwater boats...

  1. #1
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    Talking 24' saltwater boats...

    The wife and I are entertaining the idea of buying a boat primarily for the saltwater. A 24 footer seems to ba a good all around size that I want to stick with. It shouldn't break the bank and will fit our needs. Aluminum is preferred. From the forum threads and personal experience, the Hewescraft Alaskan's and Searunners sure get good ratings. What about other boats like the Alumaweld Intruder hardtop or the Fish Rite Performer? Anyone heard firsthand or have any knowlege/experience with these boats of this size or others? Preference- # of Motor(s)? Hardtops? Softtops? Brand of motor? GPH? Anything..... If so, can I hear about it?

    We won't buy till next season, and since people are out now using their setups and watching others using theirs, any and all information will be appreciated. Good or bad... This will assist me in making my decision and do some shopping around.

    Thank you...

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    Thumbs up

    Oh yah.. Almost forgot... What about buying the boat in Alaska? Yae or nea? Who has the better deals or are just plain better to deal with? I'm all for supporting the local guy, but if I can save a few grand or ?? by going outside, I'll consider it. I know what it costs to ship a boat from outside and what it would cost me to drive down and get it. I work 2 and 2, so I have time to drive and don't mind doing so.

    Thanks...

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    Member Snagger's Avatar
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    North river

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    Aluminum is definately the way to go, If youre looking for a jet boart thats a whole different catagory. Alumawelds and Sea runners are great fishing boats... but pretty much only fishing boats, bring your camping gear along with you. I would check out deweys cook inlet, a great store for new /used boats... also check the parking lot of west marine, craigslist.com, and try to find something that suits your needs

  5. #5

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    a 24 foot Aurora is a very popular boat up here also. Hardtop and twin engines would be awesome. We have a 27 foot aurora with twin hondas, its an awesome boat. I believe the hewes crafts ride a little nicer, but i wont get another boat that does not have a pilothouse style windshield.

  6. #6

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    Haven't bought the boat yet, but have done the research. We are planning to get a 24' HewesCraft Alaskan next spring. We like the low cost and good fishing platform. We will use it for camping, but will probably be a little sore from the nights sleep. The Harbercraft Kingfisher was a nicer, plusher, type boat. It would be much better for camping and cruising, but a little higher price. The North River Ocean boat seemed the best built. It was very heavy and solid. Would take more gas to pull and drive, but a nice boat. Problem was the high cost. The Alumaweld was high priced and didn't seem as nice. The sales guy kept telling me how nice it was, but I couldn't figure out why.

    We are mainly looking for a fishing boat and one that will provide years of service with the least money to purchase and operate. The HewesCraft seems like the best compromise. If one of the other dealers were to cut me a sweet deal I would likely change my mind.

    Keep in mind I don't own any of these boats and this is research not experience.

  7. #7

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    We're doing the exact same thing. Will be ordering this winter, still trying to decide on which boat company, so many great choices and options. Like you we read everything these great folks have to say about their boats. My current "big" boat is a 2005, 21' Lund with a 225 Honda, after being on the inlet for the last 3 years it isn't "big" enough. After being on several at the shows we're going with a 26 footer, which one though???

  8. #8

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    Are you sure you want to buy new? There's a 26-ft Hewescraft on 907bigboytoys.com or 907bigboystoys.com (Anchorage) that a friend of mine told me belongs to his neighbor and is for sale (going through a divorce). Said he's always kept very good care of it and it comes with lots of accessories already installed. I don't have an interest in this guy selling it, but if I didn't already have a 24-ft boat (already have 2-ft-itis) I'd be looking at it.

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    Thanks for the replies. The Auroras and Kingfishers are nice, but man are they spendy. I'll consider a good used setup too, something around a year 2004 and newer. I'd even seriously consider a good used 26'-er at a 24'-er price. What about the engines? Any input on those? Is twin 4 stroke 115's the way to go or what about a single 225 4-stroke? What's the difference in GPH between a single motor and twins? Your thoughts...

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    From what I've heard, more legs in the water equals more drag and worse fuel mileage. Plus 2 outboards is twice as much maintenance, and I think would be more money that 2 would cost to buy as opposed to just one. But then again some people like the redundancy of 2 motors. Personally, I'd get one large outboard and a good kicker for trolling and if you needed to limp home. If money were no object, then I'd get two.

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    Quote Originally Posted by skydiver View Post
    From what I've heard, more legs in the water equals more drag and worse fuel mileage. Plus 2 outboards is twice as much maintenance, and I think would be more money that 2 would cost to buy as opposed to just one. But then again some people like the redundancy of 2 motors. Personally, I'd get one large outboard and a good kicker for trolling and if you needed to limp home. If money were no object, then I'd get two.

    I've "heard" similar things as well regarding that a larger single motor is less drag and gets similar, if not better gph. But no confirmation on it. Yes, money "IS" an object in my case. These motors aren't cheap and a good 225 with a 15hp high thrust kicker does sound "financially" better then having 2 115's back there. Also less weight on the outback deck/transom. As far as maintenance issues, man, all of these 4 strokes go for a long time on little to nothing. I'll also be checking out who has the best warranty's. I have no problem visiting boat shops and talking to the service guys after the boating season to see what's been coming in for "repairs" and what hasn't. I've been hearing some awesome stuff about the 4 stroke Suzuki's being used down in Sitka. I'm eyeing the 225 pretty hard. Has anyone else?

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    The only way to run twins is if each motor by itself has enough power to get the boat up on step. Otherwise if one quits, you have a very expensive, very thirsty kicker. Also with modern motors problems are typically the electrical system or more common fuel. So, unless you have a truly redundant indepent electrical and fuel system, and fuel up at different locations, twins don't have an advantage. Ok, they are more manuverable at the dock.

    Can't comment on the big suzukis, I really like my 140, and have only heard good things about it. Considering the suzuki 140 is only 10#'s heavier than a yammy 115 and about the same $, I'd go suzi 140's if you opted for twins.

    But in your shoes I'd look at the 225-250 singles and a hi-torque 10 horse kicker.

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    While waiting for the Whittier tunnel to re-open yesterday, I met a guy name Chuck. He had a 26ft Hewescraft and he told me he saved over 10K by buying it in Montana.

    My wife and I have been thing of an ocean boat too, 28-34 ft. We are looking for a "project" boat and have found we can get one in L48 for about 1/3 what folks want here in Alaska.

    I.E. There is a 98 28ft Carver for at a park and sale on the old Seward Hiwy. It was appraised for over $126,000 and the owner was selling it for $82,000. We found the same boat in the L48 for $30,000 and if you want a real project you can pick one up for $10K or less.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AKBassking View Post
    While waiting for the Whittier tunnel to re-open yesterday, I met a guy name Chuck. He had a 26ft Hewescraft and he told me he saved over 10K by buying it in Montana.

    My wife and I have been thing of an ocean boat too, 28-34 ft. We are looking for a "project" boat and have found we can get one in L48 for about 1/3 what folks want here in Alaska.

    I.E. There is a 98 28ft Carver for at a park and sale on the old Seward Hiwy. It was appraised for over $126,000 and the owner was selling it for $82,000. We found the same boat in the L48 for $30,000 and if you want a real project you can pick one up for $10K or less.

    Yah, I was making a few calls and checked out some websites from "outside", and when comparing to prices up here, I just don't see a 10k markup as "shipping". I don't buy off on that one. I found a 30' boat in Port Angeles, WA for 38K and it is NICE!!!!! That boat up here even used would be 50K+. I haven't looked at Montana for pricing, but I will now... Like I said before, I work 2 & 2, so a roadtrip isn't a big deal at all for me.

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Actually shipping isn't cheap. A co-worker had a 28' bayliner shipped from Seattle to Anchorage last year, and it was $5k. Add trucking from another state, and current fuel prices, and shipping get's expensive.

    You could drive down and tow a boat back, but when you factor the value of your time, gas down and back, lodging, that also isn't cheap.

    Now if you were flying down to get a deal on a truck and a boat, it might be worth the effort

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