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Thread: Flat bottom/Jet units in the Ocean?

  1. #1
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    Question Flat bottom/Jet units in the Ocean?

    Anyone here ever take their river boats to the ocean?

    My boat is a nice stable platform I figure on nice days I could keep in the bay area (Resurrection Bay) for silvers. I'm not bold/stupid enough for open water.

    Any thoughts?

  2. #2

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    I've taken a 17 foot flatbottom valco with a 150 jet and a tunnel to pony cove before. I would say go for it just watch the forecast.

  3. #3
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Flatbottom jet boat covers a broad category of boats. In general, I'd not take one out on the ocean. Seward is open to the gulf of Alaska, has a fairly long fetch, and can really whip up the afternoon. There also really aren't any areas to pull in and hide out in Reserection as the shoreline is mostly rock and cliffs.

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    Default River boats on the ocean

    This question comes up very regularly...and without black and white answers, so I'll give it a shot as well (hopefully, I don't just stir things up worse!!) As we all know, Alaska has the most water of any state, oceans, inside passages, bays, inlets, rivers, lakes, ponds, swamps, you name it and you can find it in Alaska. For most of us, the draw isn't necessarily the water itself, but where you can go and what you can do. And most of us don't have the wherewithall to afford a specific boat for a specific use, so Alaska ends up being the "Land of Boating Compromises". Depending on what boat you have and where you want to go, you can easily find yourself considering taking a canoe to Seward (for example)...doesn't happen too often in Iowa, I can tell you that!. Most folks come to a pretty obvious conclusion that canoes aren't really suited to Seward, but having boated there for many years, I can say, "I've seen canoes on Resurrection Bay!" Would I do it? Probably not. Are the people still alive? Maybe. Maybe not. Back to the original question; "Anyone here ever take their river boats to the ocean?"...and the answer would be "Yes." Are flat-bottom river boats best suited to Res Bay...probably not. If the only boat I had was a flat-bottom river boat and I could take it to Seward (providing it was a nice day, the forecast was good and I was as prepared as I could be), I probably would. Don't know that I'd recommend it however! The ideal 'compromise' boat is exactly that; a compromise. It might not do everything you want to do but most likely is/was designed for a specific type of water/situation, so the trick is to try and use the boat within the limitations of it's design and capabilities and most importantly, within yours! Err to the side of caution and you'll minimize the chances of problems; throw caution to the wind and you're only playing Russian Roulette. Any advice you might get/give is just that; advice. Use your head, play it safe, catch fish and come home....oh, yeah and get ready to do it all over again!

  5. #5
    Member MARV1's Avatar
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    Default

    Pretty much depends on the size of your boat. Forget it if it is a smaller boat.
    The emphasis is on accuracy, not power!

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    Default

    Assuming you're a reasonable guy who'd only venture out in suitable weather, there's nothing dangerous about it. Any boat has limits to what it can take. But.... even in light chop a flat-bottom will pound you if you try to go fast, which you won't because the jet will be cavitating and pumping air. It's very frustrating.

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    Default risky

    Obviously, very risky. "Watch the weather" is nice, but the weather is unpredictable, and changes quickly. Like mentioned, a little chop causes cavitation w/ your jet, slowing you down, and then more chop causes.... eventually you aren't going anywhere. Stick very close to a safe harbor, and don't be greedy when the fish are slamming and the wind comes up; been there, done that. Good luck.

  8. #8
    Member trbndoc's Avatar
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    Cool

    I have done it and had great success; but it will keep your pucker factor on maximium. As Mr Pid said the cavitating is frustrating; but with a little trial and error you can learn to minimize it. You will have to learn to manipulate the back of your boat to stay in contact with the waves for the maximum amout of time; this will also help reduce the amount of slamming that will happen with the front of your boat. My experiance has been that going out is usually a lot easier than when you are coming back in with the waves. your speed will depend on the distance between waves. but for the most part you will just have to go slow. I have been in valdez when the water is like glass; then of course its just like being on you favorite lake. Just be mindful it doesnt stay that way long. I would remind you that most of the protected area you will be in has much larger boats coming and going; they tend to be more of a hazard to you than anything. I would recommend that you have all of the safety gear required by the coasties especially a good radio. Its been said before just be mindful of your surroundings and you will have a good experiance.

  9. #9
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Default 21ft Alaskan II

    I have a 21 Wooldridge Alaskan II. I have had it all over PWS. I have run out of Whittier, Seward and Valdez almost 2000 miles total. As said the jet will cav in a chop and suck up seaweed and other floatsum. I have air ride seats in mine and this really helps. I carry cold water survival suits on board and have a radio, sat phone ect.... The weather can come up very quickly. Always have a chart and be prepared to hide and wait it out if you have to. Pick up the book Cruising PWS. It pays to know where you can get out of the weather. PWS is one of my most favorite places in Alaska. Get out and enjoy it. Be prepared and be careful.
    I did mod my boat to run a prop this year, got tired of hanging off the back fishing seaweed out of the grate.

    Steve



  10. #10
    Member LungShot's Avatar
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    Default all the time

    I live in Juneau, and I take my 18ft flat bottom out every week in the salt. I dont go more than a couple miles away, and I just watch the waves, and weather. Never had a moment even close to scary - no swampings - no nothing. It can beat you to death though. Keep in mind - these boats are NOT built to handle those wave poundings so slow down when it's rough.

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