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Thread: It's Working!

  1. #1
    Mark
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    Default It's Working!

    The access restrictions, infighting, ridiculous over-regulation, etc is working!:

    .....But the number of people hunting and fishing in Alaska and across the United States has declined overall, according to a survey released last week by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Across the U.S., the number of people fishing has dropped 12 percent, and the number of people hunting has decreased 4 percent since 2001.

    There's been an especially steep decline in Alaska compared with the agency's 2001 survey, said Jerry Leonard, a Fish and Wildlife economist who crunched the numbers for the report. Recreational fishing is down 26 percent in Alaska, Leonard said, and hunting is down 24 percent in the state......
    And look who is replacing us:

    .....Yet even as the number of people hunting and fishing has slid, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife survey found that the number of people who are actively engaged in what they term "wildlife viewing" has risen. Those activities include just about any outdoor pursuit, ranging from bird-watching to whitewater rafting. Nationwide, the numbers jumped 8 percent from five years ago, the study found. In Alaska, it went up 22 percent.

    "Those wildlife viewing numbers, we're talking dollars, tourists coming up to look at bears and leaving money in Alaska," said Danny Consenstein, chief operating officer of the Renewable Resources Coalition, a group that is fighting the development of the Pebble copper-and-gold project near Iliamna in Southwest Alaska.....
    Remember that in controlled use areas a "viewer" can use motorized vehicles in the area to enjoy their activity.

    You just can't hunt using the vehicles.

    And there's a mystery to all this?

  2. #2
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    Yep.

    I haven't wet a line in nearly 3 years. I sold my boat.

    And I used to fish the river nearly every day. The day the river was so choked with guides that I couldn't get past beaver creek, decided it for me.

    I have barely been hunting in the same period. Too ****ed many people and not enough access. I went out bow hunting with my son-in-law last weekend only because he wanted to go. My heart wasn't in it.

    I wonder how many others of the percent quoted agree with me or have other reasons.

  3. #3

    Default River

    I spent most of my childhood in the summers on the river. I now only go out for silvers in the fall, in fact will be going tomorrow morning to get the boat wet for the first time this year. I could get into the experiences I've had with those sides battling over the resources this summer, but that's a whole 'nother discussion that doesn't belong here.
    "Everything that lives and moves will be food for you. Just as I gave you the green plants, I now give you everything."

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark View Post
    The access restrictions, infighting, ridiculous over-regulation, etc is working!:



    And look who is replacing us:



    Remember that in controlled use areas a "viewer" can use motorized vehicles in the area to enjoy their activity.

    You just can't hunt using the vehicles.

    And there's a mystery to all this?
    Yes, but the article also said:
    ALASKA'S NUMBERS

    Alaska's on-the-ground numbers show a slightly different picture from the federal survey, said Doug Vincent-Lang, a special projects coordinator for the Alaska Department of Fish and Game. They measure the "days fished," which saw a decline from 2005 to 2006, but it was not a dramatic drop, he said. The state also saw the number of fishing licenses slide from 2005 to 2006 after it added a surcharge to pay for a fish hatchery. The state generally sells between 400,000 to 500,000 licenses, and while there have been minor fluctuations, officials still think their numbers show an increase over time, Vincent-Lang said.

    Still, it's true that a smaller portion of the state's population is fishing. Ten years ago, almost half of Alaskans sought a fishing license, he said.

    "Now, we're down to about 40 percent," he said. "We're selling more numbers, it's just not keeping pace with the population growth."
    So, there are more hunters/fisherman in the woods/on the water than ever before, but it just isn't as much of a percentage of the population....

  5. #5
    Mark
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    Quote Originally Posted by DPhillips View Post
    Yes, but the article also said:

    ALASKA'S NUMBERS

    Alaska's on-the-ground numbers show a slightly different picture from the federal survey, said Doug Vincent-Lang, a special projects coordinator for the Alaska Department of Fish and Game. They measure the "days fished," which saw a decline from 2005 to 2006, but it was not a dramatic drop, he said. The state also saw the number of fishing licenses slide from 2005 to 2006 after it added a surcharge to pay for a fish hatchery. The state generally sells between 400,000 to 500,000 licenses, and while there have been minor fluctuations, officials still think their numbers show an increase over time, Vincent-Lang said.

    Still, it's true that a smaller portion of the state's population is fishing. Ten years ago, almost half of Alaskans sought a fishing license, he said.

    "Now, we're down to about 40 percent," he said. "We're selling more numbers, it's just not keeping pace with the population growth."

    So, there are more hunters/fisherman in the woods/on the water than ever before, but it just isn't as much of a percentage of the population....
    You're right.

    In 1994 I performed some research for a book. Alaska sold 95,000 hunting licenses that year, and of those approximately 10,000 were to non-residents.

    Recently?:

    .....Over the past three years the sale of hunting and trapping licenses has ranged from 139,539 in 2003 to 134,562 in 2004 to 137,747 in 2005 (most recent year available). These totals include resident, nonresident and military licenses. The three year running average for this period of time is 137,283. License sales appear to be rebounding from a low in 2004. One incentive for hunters to buy licenses is confidence that game populations are abundant and that there are good opportunities to hunt and harvest game.....
    I suspect a different social attitude has been affecting hunting over the past couple of decades and we're seeing more of it. I believe the hunter/fisher/gatherer attitude is dying as the environmental ideology/religion grows.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark View Post
    I suspect a different social attitude has been affecting hunting over the past couple of decades and we're seeing more of it. I believe the hunter/fisher/gatherer attitude is dying as the environmental ideology/religion grows.
    You are probably right. I suspect the more detached people's lives become from living day to day with, or nearby, natural habitat, the less interested they will want to become part of it and the more interested they will want to just "observe" it.

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