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Thread: In danger of losing my most endearing and trusted hunting partner

  1. #1

    Default In danger of losing my most endearing and trusted hunting partner

    My hunting partner of the last five years may not be in moose camp with me this year. He has endured being snowed in, seasons with nothing but rain and near freezing temps, and almost every other condition with a smile on his face. He works his rear off, cooks, cleans, and doesn't complain while hiking uphill in the tussocks or underbush. He also makes everyone else in camp remember what it is like to be a kid and everyone else seems to work for fun and enjoy life more when he is around. We explore more and seem to hunt better.

    My son is in danger of being lost to moose camp. His school decided that he cannot miiss 10 days a semester, excused absence or not. He will fail if he does. He is an A and B student and places every year in the geography bee. He has always done premakeup before or has done his school work in camp. Never a problem in the past.

    This belongs in this area of the forum as kids are our future. My hunting partner is my 11 year old son. He learns more about life on one trip into camp than one year of schooling can ever teach him. Ask his mother(my ex wife) who dislikes even camping, if hunting has taught him to be self sufficient, respectful, and enjoy the simple pleasures in life like hard work. She is more upset than I am. I guess she likes the meat more than I knew.lol


    Sorry for the rant, but I feel it is important. My sons keep me young, make me remember what life is truley about, and make me see the treasures of the outdoors (that I had forgotten) once again every outing.


    Home schooling and maybe Bushrat's way of life seem better and better every day since I moved to a populuce area.

    Dan

  2. #2

    Default That Really Sucks

    What a bunch of bullcrap - another case of the public education system trying to dictate how our children are raised. If your son can handle the workload and makes up the work, it's no one's business whether he takes 10 days off school during the schoolyear, and they should spend their time on the kids who need more help passing the classes.

    I took a week off school (and a couple of single days here and there) every year from kindergarten through 12th grade to go hunting with my family, that's what ENSURED my success in school - it was made very clear to me that the week off was a privilege, and would only continue as long as my grades remained good. I can attribute the Honor Roll, academic scholarships to college, and Dean's List achievements to the goal orientation that the hunting carrot provided. And I also agree with you, I learned more in 7-10 days in the wilderness, than I would have in school. I learned how to think, make decisions, and accept the consequences for bad decisions, which is part of what education tries to impart on us.

    I am sorry for your predicament, and hope for your son's sake and yours that this lunacy is a short-term malady.

    Michael

  3. #3
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    Smile

    Yeah, thats terrible. I can tell you the reason for this is that many kids miss that many days due to neglectful parents who cannot get their kids out of bed or who are addicted to something so their kids dont care about school. Teachers tend to be really rigid (my family has many teachers) and they need to learn to see the difference between a kid missing school due to negligence and one who works hard and spends time with his family. That school needs to make exceptions for prearranged absences for kids who are passing all of their subjects. I agree with MD: I got honor roll grades and missed hunting time ever year. I read my books everyday caribou hunting! Are their any other schools in your area that your son could attend?
    “I come home with an honestly earned feeling that something good has taken place. It makes no difference whether I got anything, it has to do with how the day was spent. “ Fred Bear

  4. #4

    Default What School

    Let us know what school and I will do my part in writing a letter to the principal and superintendent. We do not need to be pushing the good kids away and teaching them the lessons of our corrupted school systems. This is another example of putting things besides the kid's best interest first. You are correct in that this does belong on this forum and it is important. I would encourage you to do everything you can to fight for your right as a parent to raise your children as you see fit.
    "Everything that lives and moves will be food for you. Just as I gave you the green plants, I now give you everything."

  5. #5
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    Default Sorry but I agree

    I know what it was like to miss school for hunting (our school was closed for the deer opener) and we went every year for a week of bow huinting during school. That said, 10 days in a row out of school is a little excessive. Why not just go for a week? He gets 5 left for illness or whatever.

    The schools have to make sure your kid is kept up, given homework, etc. and a week makes it a little more palatable for the teacher and the SD. No one is against hunting I hope at the school just trying to keep the kid on track. This isn't unreasonable from the schools viewpoint, you just need to be more flexible with your hunts and being realistic on what he will be able to do.

    Any teachers out there want to chime in on a kid missing ten days in a row?

    Great that you're taking him hunting that is to be commended. Just try to see the schools viewpoint.

    G

  6. #6
    Member walk-in's Avatar
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    Default why not?

    I have parents who think nothing of taking their kids out of school for family vacations for a week or 2 in January and February to go to Hawaii or some other warm place (right after they had 2 weeks off for Christmas). It doesn't bother me. I figure as long as the parents realize that the work still needs to get done, they can't complain if missing that amount of school has a negative impact on the kid's grade.
    IMO, moose hunting is a better excuse for missing school than laying on the beach in Hawaii (or more likely sitting in the hotel room watching TV and playing video games). Sitting in a classroom isn't the only way to get an education. I learned a lot of valuable lessons when I was a kid from hunting. Hell, I take time off for hunting. Why shouldn't my students?

  7. #7
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    Default

    Sounds to me like you need to take this up with the school board. Go over some heads and raise a ruckus. The school/educational system is supposed to serve YOU. NOT, dictate to you how you can raise your child and hold you and you son hostage in a case like this.
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and don’t have one, you’ll probably never need one again

  8. #8

    Default What!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by Gooch View Post
    I know what it was like to miss school for hunting (our school was closed for the deer opener) and we went every year for a week of bow huinting during school. That said, 10 days in a row out of school is a little excessive. Why not just go for a week? He gets 5 left for illness or whatever.

    The schools have to make sure your kid is kept up, given homework, etc. and a week makes it a little more palatable for the teacher and the SD. No one is against hunting I hope at the school just trying to keep the kid on track. This isn't unreasonable from the schools viewpoint, you just need to be more flexible with your hunts and being realistic on what he will be able to do.

    Any teachers out there want to chime in on a kid missing ten days in a row?

    Great that you're taking him hunting that is to be commended. Just try to see the schools viewpoint.

    G
    And who raises your kids? I don't mean to insult or piss you off, but it's a ligitimate question. Just because there are a lot of deadbeats out there that don't raise their kids doesn't mean that the government should step in and tell well meaning responsible adults how to raise theirs. I would look into homeschooling for the semester, or permanently. IT IS NOT THEIR PLACE!!!!

    The schools do not have to "make sure your kid is kept up, given homework, etc.", THAT'S YOUR JOB.
    "Everything that lives and moves will be food for you. Just as I gave you the green plants, I now give you everything."

  9. #9
    Member GITDEMBARS's Avatar
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    Default What school is it???

    That is crazy!!!! I never imagined in my wildest dreams that something so stupid would even be considered here.
    Moose season aside, 10 days is nothing. Every kid in my family missed at least 10 days in a row do to chicken pox. So if a kid gets chicken pox or some other illness that keeps them out of school for 10 days they won't be allowed to be sick or have a family emergency for the rest of the semester !?! Is that even legal??
    Regardless of the reason, if I as a parent excuse them from school there should be no questions asked. I get more and more irritated by the school system every year but this takes the cake.
    I would definately fight this one as high as it could go.

  10. #10

    Default

    You may want to ask for a written copy of the School Districts policy on excused and unexcused absences. It is my understanding that the school does not have the authority to regulate absences, it is done at the district level.

    Not only can you contact the school board, and superintendent, but contact your legislators as well. Hunting is recognized as a valuable family, cultural, and economic activity in this state, and the legislator can help push the right buttons.

  11. #11
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    Default Raising My Kids

    Not pissed a bit Blackfoot, a great question actually. I have no children and don't plan to. The reason that the government has to step in is that there ARE deadbeat parents who just don't give a darn whether their kid is in school or not.

    The government has a responsibility to ensure a good quality education for our kids in order to ensure a prosperous future for the country. Cheesy I know but true. If they have decided that more than 10 abscences may be derimental to that than so be it. Sorry, if that is an issue - try private school or homeschooling. The schools are trying to do the best they can to meet Pres. Bush's NCLB requirements that are NOT funded by the the feds.

    I agree that is is a parents job to make sure that kids get their homework done as well. What I was saying is that the schools DO have to take the time to prepare all of your kids homework for his 10 day hunting trip prior to the rest of the class and make sure he or she is up to speed with the rest of the class upon their return. That IS the schools job if the kid is allowed to be gone that long. With ever growing class sizes (due to lack of funding) can you imagine the time that would be required to do this for lots of kids?

    I agree hunting is the best reason to take time off from school and I would do the same for my kids if I had any. Fact of the matter remains that if a kid can't miss ten days he can't miss ten days. Get pissed at the deadbeat parents who have gotten the system to this point and probably refuse to fund education related expenses.

    I work in higher education by the way not public schools but I do get to interact with all levels of education on a daily basis. My opinion - the teachers do the best they can as does the school system. Please try to see each side of the coin. Right now would be a prime time to be in the field for 10 days before school starts.

    Dan, I truly am sorry you can't get your kid out this fall during your moose trip. I have some weekend alternatives if it comes down to it. Please PM me.

    Gooch

  12. #12

    Default Misunderstood

    Gooch,

    I misunderstood your statement, and as I re-read it I see that. I thought you meant it was up to the school to take care of your kids, but I see what you meant now. I do see both points, but having dealt with the teachers and administrators around here from both a student, parent, and family members working with them, I have no faith in MOST, but not all, of the teachers and schools around here. I suppose I should stay more on the subject. How can we help this child be able to go on a hunt and still do well in his studies? Any ideas?
    "Everything that lives and moves will be food for you. Just as I gave you the green plants, I now give you everything."

  13. #13
    Member akhunter3's Avatar
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    Default

    Yea, I feel the bite in my butt every year after I get back from Caribou hunting. Normally miss the first week-week and a half of school. The School District is NOT helpfull in this type of situation, and I've gotten stuck with "Attendance Probation" several times.......not a fan of they're policies to say the least.

    Talk to the school board, the district shouldn't be able to keep your son from enjoying the outdoors and learning how to survive.



    Good luck and I hope you get to keep your hunting partner!


    Jon

  14. #14
    Member Burke's Avatar
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    Default hunting partner

    I can understand your frustration...I am a teacher and I fully understand the value of family time, be it hunting, vacation, or just dinner and conversation.

    Usually attendance is not a school policy, rather a district policy (at least in my experience, I have taught here and in Montana). Districts are under the gun from the state, and the state from the feds etc. Part of NCLB is making Annual Yearly Progress and that formula is complex with attendance being a factor, therefore the seemingly unrealistic attendance policy. Example; The state of Alaska recently changed the entire school year schedule to accomodate these mandates (NCLB & AYP) and provide more time of instruction prior to the high stakes testing.
    There is not a lot of teeth in the truancy laws and those laws make no difference to those who habitually are absent. That does create a problem for those who value education and can handle the time away from school. I am not trying to justify...just briefly explain where some of the issues come from. I personnaly would be comfortable allowing exceptions to the rule where it seems appropriate, however, not always my choice. Sometimes it is difficult to allow exceptions...Imagine if you were allowed to drive 120 miles per hour because you had a nice car and race experience and everyone else had to stick to 55mph (maybe not the best example).
    I believe in public education, recognizing it has postive and negative attributes. Public education is changing, sometimes for the better and sometimes, arguably not. It is difficult to please all parties involved.
    Sorry you are placed in a tough place. I am not sure if this eases your mind much, but sometimes knowing the why helps a little.
    Try your best to work with the school and figure something out that will accomodate you, your son and the school...
    where theres a will theres a way!

  15. #15
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    Default

    I would call there bluff. While also contacting the school board as well as an attorney. Enjoy your hunt. If you loose your case then home school. Does Alaska have min. hours for home school or is it books they must complete. Either way it can be done. I would enjoy your hunt and not worry about what they want. You and your family is what matters. We only live once, I say take the bull by the horns and enjoy. Just my 2 cents.

  16. #16

    Default

    As a former teacher, this no child left behind policy is pure BS.....What a crock! It is a knee jerk reaction by the government for our continued failed school policies.

    You should indeed be able to take your child on a 10 day excused absence. Period.

    This is another example of how this country has become fascist.

  17. #17
    Member fullkurl's Avatar
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    Angry Outrageous!

    Quote Originally Posted by Snyd View Post
    Sounds to me like you need to take this up with the school board. Go over some heads and raise a ruckus. The school/educational system is supposed to serve YOU. NOT, dictate to you how you can raise your child and hold you and you son hostage in a case like this.
    Well said, Perry.

    Dan, I'd not go quietly with this one. I would make a big deal about it too with the Board.

    Can't think of a more important education for a child than the week and a half every year full of family time, the outdoors, life stories, lessons and experiences. A kid spends most of his awake life in the classroom.
    I'd take him anyway!

    Frank

  18. #18

    Default The Seeds of Socialism....

    A typical societal knee-jerk reaction - have an issue that seems to be a challenge, so make a policy that looks good on the surface, but which actually draws BOTH ends (low achievers AND high achievers) back towards the middle of the pack. So the high achievers are penalized for something they're not part of....

    Kids spend a lot of time in class, and what do they get? Assignments spelled out by the teachers....homework laid out well in advance.....instruction given to the masses...and not a lot of time for individual instruction and learning how to make decisions. This is not a knock on teachers - the sheer numbers game of teacher-to-student ratio makes this a necessity, to get all of the kids through the curriculum. Until we have more people signing up to teach, this will be a challenge all teachers and schools will face.

    But they're missing the values and lessons that time in the outdoors, in small groups, can teach - a young kid can learn:
    - planning/preparation skills
    - decision making skills
    - all decisions can have good and bad consequences
    - how to act responsibly at a younger age than most kids
    - the circle of life
    - science, health, etc
    - and more I'm forgetting

    Maybe your son could write an essay or something similar that could get him some class credit...heck, when I was in elementary school on Elmendorf AFB, I was the editor of the school paper...wanna know what two feature articles were? My first caribou, and my Dad's biggest moose....not sure those topiccs would pass muster in our softer society today.

    Every year my Mom would visit the school at the start of the school year, tell them that I would be missing 5-7 days of class, and ask that my teachers gave me some of the assignments in advance, so I would be up to speed on my return, and would only need to take a couple of tests....if it worked then, it can work now.

    Michael

  19. #19

    Default

    A friend of mine had a medical deal with his daughter and they tried the same thing.Then he remembered the basketball team going to the states,they missed more then the ten days.Where does your kid go to school?Do you know of any sports teams leaving the state to goof around?You should take some time and maybe ask around to find out.Then throw it back into their faces.

  20. #20
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    Default take him

    Ask/demand to see an attendance record of all the kids in your son's school, from last year, and let them know that you will be back at the end of this year for another one. I've heard all this "you gotta attend X days, or else" BS often, unless you are talking about little Miss/Mr Perfect, who is into 7 activities and maintains a 3.9 GPA. Kids like that miss many, many days per year, and no one peeps. I do not think any school district is stupid enough to try to implement this "policy" as an iron clad law of the land. The lawsuits would bury them. Sure, it is a pain in the butt for the teachers, but we have to deal w/ it, esp when a family is doing family things. Just DO NOT ask the teachers to give you detailed "lesson plans" for every day; I'd tell you to take a long hike. Get an idea of what will be covered, cover it w/ your kid, and go back ready to operate. It sounds to me like a very legitimate experience. Have fun.

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