Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Kayak advice.

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Long Island, New York.
    Posts
    10

    Default Kayak advice.

    Hi,

    I am looking for a kayak or canoe. The problem is that I have a broken / healing hip, and have accumulated a few (alright, more than a few) extra pounds. If I go over, I don't know that I can get back in as easily as I would have at one time previously. My primary use will be on calm rivers, and bays.

    Any info will be appreciated.

  2. #2
    Moderator Alaskacanoe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Sterling
    Posts
    1,450

    Default kayaking

    A few extra pounds, a disability, or most any other problem you think you may have,,, will not restrict you from enjoying kayaking.
    Manufactures and designers now have made Kayaks to fit just about every need and body size you could imagine. With over 60% of our population getting larger than a generation ago, savy designers have made larger openings and more comfortable seats etc.
    Kayaking is such a great sport, because no matter how big or small you are, once in the boat, you are pretty much equal. To paddle a Kayak effieciently requires only a few pounds of energy.
    Patience is key though in dealing with those that have disabilities or injuries such as your hip injury. Planning is important when dealing with such things.
    First you may need some assistance to stabilize the kayak for entry or exit. You are going to need to find suitable places ( shoreline) to make a safe entry and exit.
    Safety and knowing how to get in and out of a kayak are key and make the sport so much more fun and comfortable. If you have a local club, take advantage of it and join. These will be good and helpful people that can show you the tricks of easy entry and exit, and paddling techniques. Also providing support by going as a group will build confidence.

    second you will need to simulate or sit in the kayak itself while on land to determine if sitting for long periods on time in the boat in that position works for you, you may need to adjust or even add some padding to the seat area. With any injury or disability, pain is often a big part of the equation, so take the time to make your self as comfortable as possible.
    When or if you decide to buy a Kayak
    Go to the outdoor stores and ask the clerk to let you sit in the kayaks. I have done this at REI before and had a clerk get a little testy when I asked him to lower a kayak from a ceiling hanging rack.
    I just walked to the front of the store and asked for the manager of the store. In a few minutes I had any Kayak I wanted to test lowered so I could could get a good look and sit in the craft.
    Most of us would not buy a car without trying out the seating and the overall feel. Do the same with any outdoor equipment. This may save you from purchasing something that just does not fit..
    Anyway.. I am sure I have missed plenty of points here, but these are some of my thoughts..
    Max

    third make your first few outings short and easy. Make sure you can quit anytime it no longer becomes enjoyable, ie, ( don't head out to a distant shore several miles away, so it requires you a long time to return to your put in point) Stay close in a smaller lake.
    When you come to a fork in the trail, take it!

    Rentals for Canoes, Kayaks, Rafts, boats serving the Kenai canoe trail system and the Kenai river for over 15 years. www.alaskacanoetrips.com

  3. #3

    Default My .02 and A Question

    I know PGG asked the original question, but it sounds like AKCanoe has a lot of experience, so this question is for you AKC - might a sit-on-top be a good starter for PGG? I have an 11' sit-on-top that I use in Maryland to kayak and fish on the Potomac River, and it can also be used for ocean kayaking if I wanted (in calmer areas). Might a sit-on-top be easier for a beginner than the standard kayak type?

    Michael

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Long Island, New York.
    Posts
    10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mdhunter View Post
    I know PGG asked the original question, but it sounds like AKCanoe has a lot of experience, so this question is for you AKC - might a sit-on-top be a good starter for PGG? I have an 11' sit-on-top that I use in Maryland to kayak and fish on the Potomac River, and it can also be used for ocean kayaking if I wanted (in calmer areas). Might a sit-on-top be easier for a beginner than the standard kayak type?

    Michael
    Actually, a sit on top is what a salesmam said would be better.

    How is the stability?

  5. #5

    Default I like mine...

    It's an 11 foot Emotion Exhilarator, you can proibably search Google and it will show you an image and description....I really like it, and I think it's pretty stable, expecially if you're using it in mellow rivers and bays. I like having my feet on top, it's fairly stable to start, and if I want a little more stability I just dangle my feet over each side - of course, that may be a little cold in an Alaskan Bay, but it works.

    I've only tipped mine over once, when I tried to row upstream through some small rapids, got in the middle of the rapid and couln't make it, and tried to come back down - got sideways, leaned a little, and over I went! But that was an extreme situation, where I was trying to row through something I should have waded through.

    Michael

  6. #6
    Member trapperrick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Seward, AK
    Posts
    201

    Default

    I've got two yaks, one is a rotomolded platic and the other is an inflatable "Thrill Kat", sit on top. The inflatable is half the weight and about 100 times more stable than the plastic one. It's not as fast in the water but I've never bumped my butt getting in or out of the inflatable either. I bought the Thrill Kat wholesale but it was still almost 3x the price of the plastic one. I can't remember exactly what weight it's made of but it's like 60 lb PVC. You can pump it up so tight that you can hardly made a dent in it.

  7. #7
    New member
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Seward
    Posts
    1

    Default disabled kayaking

    There's a few other options for you. There are a number of kayaks made with outriggers. Triak makes a trimaran sailing kayak as does Hobie. Easy Rider kayaks makes singles and doubles that have outriggers (both single outrigger and trimaran versions) that can be used for sailing or plain paddling. And in some of the paddling magazines I've seen an add-on outrigger that can be mounted on any kayak. Spring Creek kayak and canoe makes a tri-type stablizer that isn't very expensive. You can find them on the web. The last is problably the cheapest option. Any of the above would make a very stable platform that you wouldn't have to worry about tipping at all and would be very easy to climb in and out of. Check them out.

    AK sailor

  8. #8
    Member Riptide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    88

    Default Soars inflatables would do you perfect

    Try Soars line of inflatables. The 16' is just about perfect for everthing/


    http://www.soar1.com/soar_16.htm

    Great resale value too.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •