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Thread: Who say .270 ain't 'nough for moose???

  1. #1
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    Default Who say .270 ain't 'nough for moose???

    http://www.wildlife.alaska.gov/regul...s_complete.pdf

    One shot from a .270! Hmph to all those who say a .30+ is what's needed to harves a moose...Heck I remember watching Wayne Kubats Vid with a 338 & took the moose three shots to go down!

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    Default good shot

    A good shot w/ a .270 is plenty; I've done it a few times, and am sure 100's of people have done it more. It is the longer shots, or through a bit of brush, a leg you did not quite miss, or the fur ball behind you that makes the 338, or whatever, nice.

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    Member shphtr's Avatar
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    Default common sense

    You can kill a moose with a .22 rimfire....but it not a good idea. It's not WHAT IS POSSIBLE, but rather what the dictates of common sense would recommend! Most people would agree that there are better choices for moose hunting than a 270. But if that is all you have and you recognize the limitations of your caliber/cartridge choice......then use common sense before pulling the trigger.

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    Default

    I think too much emphasis gets placed on caliber rather than shooter ability...

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    Default

    Lotsa meese drop dead in front of .270s every year, especially in the bush.

    Belted mangalums become more prevalent the closer you get to the gravitational pull of Los Anchorage.
    Now what ?

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    Member bushrat's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by stevelyn
    Belted mangalums become more prevalent the closer you get to the gravitational pull of Los Anchorage.
    So true, so true! I stay out of these caliber discussions but loved that thought Steve.

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    Default 270

    I used my 270 on a cow moose last year and it dropped like a rock. It was facing me and I took a shot I have never taken before at 80 yards. Right through the the front center of the chest. That being said I would generally opt to use my 300 win which my son had borrowed and after the results with the 270 I may rethink the feasibility of that frontal shot with my 300. I would listen to input on that particular shot to see if others have used it and what the results were.

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    Member MARV1's Avatar
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    Default I second that

    Quote Originally Posted by OneLunG View Post
    I think too much emphasis gets placed on caliber rather than shooter ability...
    All that is really needed is a .223 . One of my cousins bagged her moose yesterday while using her dad's AR-15.(pic's later)
    The emphasis is on accuracy, not power!

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    Thumbs up 270

    I have used the 270 on moose, black bears, caribou, deer and so on. I have seen it used on elk, sheep and grizzlies as well and all I can say is that it's a very capable caliber and I have been impressed every time. It's very underrated and doesn't get the credit it deserves in my opinion. I personnally wouldn't hesitate to shoot a grizzly with it. I like it.and have NO problems taking it hunting up here...

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    Thumbs up .270

    My first centerfire was a .270 and it was a great rifle! (wish I still had it)....got my eye on a No.1 Ruger in .270 right now....

  11. #11

    Default Wow

    Quote Originally Posted by MARV1 View Post
    All that is really needed is a .223 . One of my cousins bagged her moose yesterday while using her dad's AR-15.(pic's later)
    Yikes!!! From one extreme to the other, I think there are some ego issues. "I can kill an elephant with a BB" to "One shot from my 577 Tyrannasouras and that jackrabbit didn't know what hit him". C'mon, I have never seen a serious discussion about caliber stay serious. Use what you are comfortable with, and just don't waste an animal by wounding it.
    "Everything that lives and moves will be food for you. Just as I gave you the green plants, I now give you everything."

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    Default Well, There is a moose in the AKDF&G

    Publication that was shot once with at .243, so what would two one HUNDRETHS of an inch matter?

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    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Smile Uhhhh... that would be me!

    In my warped way of thinking, being so closely pulled into gravitational orbit around the community derisively referred to as "Los Anchorage", the question of whether the .270 is an adequate caliber for moose is really the wrong question. A more productive mental exercise would center on the consideration of which caliber one would like to be carrying when packing raw meat on their back, after dark, through brown bear country. I have yet to attempt it, but I think I could probably get a moose to expire with a well-aimed SHOUT- they're just not that hard to kill. But I'd be somewhat less optimistic of the outcome using that tactic on those big brown furry critters with fangs and claws if I was packing a hundred pounds of bear snacks on my body. No, I'm afraid I favor a well-aimed shot out of a larger bore, even if I were hunting Sitka blacktail deer.

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    Default Moose choices

    1. Shot placement

    2. Caliber choice

    3. Bullet selection

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    Member fullkurl's Avatar
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    Thumbs up yep.

    Quote Originally Posted by shphtr View Post
    You can kill a moose with a .22 rimfire....but it not a good idea. It's not WHAT IS POSSIBLE, but rather what the dictates of common sense would recommend! Most people would agree that there are better choices for moose hunting than a 270. But if that is all you have and you recognize the limitations of your caliber/cartridge choice......then use common sense before pulling the trigger.
    Right on.
    The .270 is a great load, but a larger bullet makes good sense for all large (and sometimes dangerous) game.
    That said, shoot well with whatever load you choose...

    Frank

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    Default On Your Mark

    Mr. Strahan has it aptly put; you just can't barter a high caliber with a lower one when you are in a position of standing up/down to a bear. Yeah, a .270 or even a .223 mag is able to put down a moose with a well placed shot but you have heard of the stories of hunters emptying a 44mag or 357 on a grizz and ending up in the dead guy columns of the newspapers. Responsibility should take presidence over ego when it comes to hunting; if not for your own safety but the for the sake of your game and other critters.

    1. Be reasonable
    2. Be safe
    3. Be accurate
    4. Be alive to do it all over again

    If you don't think that a dead moose stench is a primary bear attractant then you have no business moose hunting.
    "He who is slow to anger is better than the mighty, and he who rules his spirit is better than he who takes a city." ~ Proverbs 16:32

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    Default well said

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Strahan View Post
    In my warped way of thinking, being so closely pulled into gravitational orbit around the community derisively referred to as "Los Anchorage", the question of whether the .270 is an adequate caliber for moose is really the wrong question. A more productive mental exercise would center on the consideration of which caliber one would like to be carrying when packing raw meat on their back, after dark, through brown bear country. I have yet to attempt it, but I think I could probably get a moose to expire with a well-aimed SHOUT- they're just not that hard to kill. But I'd be somewhat less optimistic of the outcome using that tactic on those big brown furry critters with fangs and claws if I was packing a hundred pounds of bear snacks on my body. No, I'm afraid I favor a well-aimed shot out of a larger bore, even if I were hunting Sitka blacktail deer.

    Ultra-light is for airplanes and fishing.

    -Mike
    Well said.

    You can go over Niagra falls in a barrel too.

    Better yet, you can try to complete the journey from Coldfoot to Deadhorse on a moped while wearing a hawaiian shirt and sandals in October.(I am certain it can be done....but why try???)

    Even if you made it (minus a few fingers and toes) I don't think it would be worth bragging about if you wanted to keep "normal" mental status.

    I would also be suspect of those who admired you for it and look for more "reasonable", "prudent and safe" people to hang out with.

    It may rub off on you.

    jedi

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    Wink

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Strahan View Post
    Ultra-light is for airplanes and fishing.

    -Mike
    Mike, as an ultra- lite fly fisherman plenty of people will say to me that Ultra- lite fishing is not sporting, not fair to the fish, so there is no pleasing everyone!
    ; for them that honour me I will honour, and they that despise me shall be lightly esteemed. 1 SAMUEL 2;30

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    Member bushrat's Avatar
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    Default

    Bearanoia aside, it's always interested me to see what people who actually live in the woods 24/7 use. My mentor, who'd been living in the bush for a long while before I came along, had finally found the "perfect all around" rifle, had it custom built. It was a Sako action with Douglass 18" stainless barrel chambered for .223, peep sights, stock hollowed out, weighed a bit less than six pounds. Our other mentor/neighbor used a Savage lever action in .243, also with peep sights. My main rifle (before the river claimed it) used to be a .257 with a scope (and iron sights). To each their own. The best bear defense really is what's between your ears, wish more people were cognizant of that. Truth be told, my neck of the woods doesn't have a lot of grizz, mostly blacks, but grizz like to wander the riverbank in the fall digging Indian Potato. I suppose in brown bear country the bushrats might be more heavily armed, not sure. A whole lot of bushrats I know wander around in the woods unarmed when hiking. In general, the amount of bearanoia in the Alaska hunting community far exceeds what is reality. Gee, if everyone carried enough boom-boom to take care of the largest land predator in Alaska, even if he wasn't ever hunting that animal, we'd have hunters running around the state with nothing less than a big belted cannon. Wait...maybe that is already the case <grin>. A couple of the float hunters I encountered last fall had a belted magnum each, AND a 12 gauge shotgun, AND bear spray, AND bear bells. I kid you not. The only thing they didn't have was a bear fence; maybe next time. Actually, the bear bells were intended for stringing up around their tent at night as an early warning system. Heck, why not just take some claymores with you and do it right! Now that's piece of mind; just be sure you know the correct direction to face them <grin>.

    Imo, packing meat after dark is not really using what's between your ears. Yeah, we all run into some unusual circumstances I suppose, but there is absolutely nothing I can think of that is gonna make me decide to pack moose meat after dark. I've gotten plenty of moose late in the day and finished butchering by firelight or headlamp, but never considered packing a load back to camp in the dark. All this talk too about running into a bear while packing meat; any of you guys actually try to shoulder a rifle and sight down the barrel with 100lbs plus of meat on your back? Sheesh. And just how are you gonna sight through a scope in the dark anyway, NO MATTER what caliber weapon you have? I am kinda suprised at some of the illogic used here - carry a big heavy caliber for bear protection while you are packing meat after dark (?). Sorry Mike...but better recommendation would be to not pack meat in the dark.

  20. #20
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    Question Live to hunt another day, I say.

    Quote Originally Posted by bushrat View Post
    Sorry Mike...but better recommendation would be to not pack meat in the dark.
    Or better yet, you could have someone shoot your game for you and pack it into your freezer... Or maybe you can just go to the store!

    Seriously; there are any number of reasons you get stuck packing meat at night and a belted mag is actually not a bad idea when you contrast having to shoulder a .257 with iron sights.

    "My main rifle (before the river claimed it) used to be a .257 with a scope (and iron sights)"

    Let's say your raft needs patched, your water intake is clogged, it's evening and starting to rain, your pickup/schedule dictates you to be somewhere the next morning/day, after you shot the game a BEAR showed up to claim it... I'm sure there's a multitude of others.

    Gimmie the best chance possible; I want to win when it comes down to me and a bear and those encounters are going up. Populations across the state are up... The Daily News just had an article this last week about increased populations around Los Anchorage, so that brings me to conclude:

    WHY is it not okay to be safe vs. sorry?
    "He who is slow to anger is better than the mighty, and he who rules his spirit is better than he who takes a city." ~ Proverbs 16:32

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