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Thread: Fisheries Biologist.

  1. #1
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    Default Fisheries Biologist.

    Hey guys,

    I just graduated highschool this year and i'm looking for a job. I love fishing so i though of a fisheries biologist. But, i live in michigan and i was told i might not get a job around here...

    I've also looked for jobs in Alaska on another site. Looked to be a deckhand on a boat or somthing of that nature. I really really love Fishing, but trying to find a fishing related career is hard. Anyone know where or how i might be able to get a fishing related job?

    I would get my education here in Michigan, and possibly get a job out in Alaska if i can.

    Well here is a thread i started on another forum. Same topic. Its just to fill you all in a little more. http://http://www.michigan-sportsman...d.php?t=195582

    Thanks,

    Shane

  2. #2
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    Default contact me via PM

    If you send me a PM with your email I can help you out. There are a number of job opportunities in Alaska and the State has an intern program to promote fish biologist. Also the various aquacultural associations hire in the summer.

  3. #3
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    You can always look into the Alaska universities -- they are not bad plus you can do summer internships (and fishing) in order to get your foot in the door. UAF is the flagship school, UAA is the campus with the most people, and UAS is very nice campus with a little fewer people. I had several friends get a BA in biology and ended up being lab rats. Most are now working on at least an MA. They enjoy the field, but the work is hit or miss with a BA.

  4. #4

    Lightbulb Fisheries jobs

    Shane,

    Fisheries biologist positions are highly sought after and very competitive. I worked for five years in the field after graduating college and elected to change fields after no full time positions came available and I was offered twice as much money for working in the environmental industry. On average, in the state I was working in, a full time fisheries position came available once every seven years and often drew hundreds of applicants. You will often have to have several years experience working as a technician or part/time volunteer in the field along with atleast a bachelors degree to have a reasonable chance at any available position. If you want to work in Alaska and go to school in Michigan, the best thing you could do would be to contact ADF&G and see what kind of summer jobs they may offer. They probably list some of these positions on their website. Most of these positions are seasonal and you will be filled right now. If you can work for them during the summer months and prove a good work ethic while obtaining your education you will be ahead of most others. The best thing I can tell you is that if you are serious, stay dedicated, and don't get dissappointed if you do not get the first few jobs that come open. Also, there is a lot of who you know in the field. I cannot stress enough that the people you meet during a summer internship will be every bit as important as the experience you gain. It is great that you are researching this now because it will give you a head start. I don't know, off the top of my head , what schools are good in Michigan, but UW Stevens Point in Wisconsin I believe has always had a good reputation for fisheries curriculum. I can't help you much with commercial fishing jobs other than to say that it is VERY hard work and that there are usually positions availbale but you will need to inquire probably during the winter months to find summer positions as most of the work is seasonal. Hope this helps. Feel free to PM me if you have anymore questions.

    Greg

  5. #5
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    There are lots of job opportunities to work on fisheries projects in AK. Both the Federal and State governments have lots of seasonal summer entry level jobs every year. The Alaska Dept. of Fish and Game is the obvious one with the State and for the Feds. there is the US Fish and Wildlife Service, National Park Service, US Forest Service, and Bureau of Land Management. I can help get you pointed in towards applying for some jobs for next summer if you are intersted send me a PM.

  6. #6

    Default fisheries jobs

    If you plan to become a fisheries biologist you will need to attain a bachelors degree at a minimum. Enroll in the University or college of your choice that has a biology program-- preferably with various fishery or marine biology classes. During one of your summers off, travel to Alaska and see what you think about it. If you finish your degree and are still motivated to come here than you should consider becoming a fisheries observer. Go to http://www.afsc.noaa.gov/FMA/employment.htm for more information. It is a challenging job that will prepare you for a career in fisheries. It can lead to a permanent position as a fisheries or marine biologist. There are also many other seasonal positions as mentioned in the posts above that are stepping stones for a career. Internships may be possible once you are enrolled in college. Good Luck.

  7. #7
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    What do you guys suggest? I want to be a feild worker. I work MUCH better with hands on things. I can do some inside work, but i dont want to do it all the time. Will i be doing lots of feild work being a Fisheries Biologist, or do i have the wrong career.

    Also again, what do you suggest. I start school Mid-January, so should i go to school in Michigan and come to Ak once i get my education done. Or head out to AK a.s.a.p. to get my education?

    Sorry for all the questions. I'm the first child in our WHOLE family to go to college, so everyone is very new at this. And to be honest, none of us have a clue.

    Thanks,

    Shane

  8. #8
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    PM Nerka as he suggested, he has a little experience you can draw from. I have seen some high school students in your predicament and they have got some summer jobs and on the job training/job shadows before making a decision, there is a lot of office work, much more than they had anticipated. Nerka can tell you more, but look at Alaska, I would bet the spend most of the winter crunching numbers and writing reports.

  9. #9
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    Do what you want to do. I know for a FACT I can gurantee you a job as a fisheries bio if you had a degree that pays you $4000 per month. (if you work every day of the month) later you can make up to $5800/month for this year if you have more sea days.

    There is alos a TON of ADF&G tech jobs. I mean every fish biologist I came up to alaska with in 97 is working as a fish biologist is some way. Some with NMFS, some with ADF&G, some with NGOs, some with private research companies or CDQ groups. There are jobs if you work hard, collect quality data, and make a name for yourself.
    Like I said if you believe you could do good work as a fisheries Biologist then keep on trying.

  10. #10
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    Kenai River Sportfishing has a scholership program at UAA and UAF for people who want to go into wildlife management, Fisheries biologist and other related fields. These scholarships are for Alaska universities but they have some great programs. Contact kenairiversportfishing.com for full information - Its the Ted Stevens Scholarship program.

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