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Thread: Boat weight limit question

  1. #1
    Member LungShot's Avatar
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    Default Boat weight limit question

    Has anyone ever filled there boat way over the recomended weight? If so - by how much? I ask only cus my calculated weight for an upcoming trip put me smack dab on the max recomended weight for my boat.

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    Member MARV1's Avatar
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    I've hauled 3500lbs of salmon in mine plus gas and myself before, was near max but was still able to get up on step and go 28mph. I have seen boats filled to where there is inches left before the water would swamp it.
    I think boat load recommendations are for general safety, you can usually add more than what is on that sticker.
    The emphasis is on accuracy, not power!

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    Default What kind of boat and how much HP behind you.....

    there's a lot of variables would go into it (boat size, hp, etc). Ultimately your safety and that of your passengers is on your shoulders to make a good decision.

    I don't think my plan would be to start out a trip loaded to the max, especially not a hunting trip where the goal is to bring home more of a load.

    With that said I pushed mine around 300lbs past what the sticker says last month. It got up on step fine and handled great. I'm running a 1860 jon w/ 90/65 jet, max weight is marked as 1600 total and we were probably close to 2000. I did it to save an extra trip hauling gear out from a fishing trip. I ran upstream a ways first and tested how she handled before heading out.

    Another tip, don't load so that you have to run WOT to stay on step....always save that last bit of throttle to help get you out of sticky situations.

    My .02

    AK_BigO

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    Default Sorry Lungshot...

    Just remembered, didn't you pick up a 18' tracker with a 90/65 earlier this year? Your #'s ought to be pretty close to mine.

    AK_BigO

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    Default Overloaded boats

    Why would you want to go past the weight capacity limit? Sure, people do it all the time; and get away with it. Alaska is littered with airplanes and boats that have been overloaded then when the air/water got nasty, the equipment broke because it was overloaded. Call me "Mr. Safety" if you want, you won't catch me overloading anything anymore; it just isn't worth the risk...and yes, I have stories; I'm just glad I'm still here to tell them. Save a few gallons or a few hours? It isn't worth it to me anymore and I find it hard to believe it would be worth it to anyone (except possibly those who just don't believe anything bad will really happen to them, just "the other guy..") If you can honestly do a realistic risk assessment with any overloaded piece of equipment, be it a truck, plane or boat and not come up with a huge red flag, you are just kidding yourself and putting yourself and possibly others at risk. My recommendation: Don't do it.

  6. #6
    Member LungShot's Avatar
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    Default Thanx

    Well thanx for all your help guys. I knew my boat would handle more than the limit on the sticker but I needed an idea of how much cus some guy told me I could go 1000lbs over. Maybe so but i doubt it's very safe.

    AK bigO - Yes I did pick up an 18ft tracker with a 90/65 jet. My capacity/weight sticker says no more than 7 persons or 1200lbs, and I just needed to know that I could go past the weight limit by 100lbs or so in a tight situation. Thanx again

    SE Mike - Im running a river so large, and slow I bet I could paddle up it so unless my boat is an inch from swamping I think I'll be fine. Also Im starting the trip with 700lbs of fuel. After boning out a moose, and eating 50lbs of food I will actually be lighter coming back DOWN river. Thanx for your concern but I too am "mr safety", and thats why I asked the question on here.

  7. #7
    Member Dupont Spinner's Avatar
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    Default

    Test locally before your trip. Running near capacity of the boat with the jet unit may not work as planned. I made a few trips near/over capacity and it can be a little tricky getting on step(hint: know where you can cross a good sand bar). Most capacity plates are for the boat powered by a prop.

    Think about the depth of the river come hunting season. I have seen many ~overweight boats~ on the rivers and they were stuck dropping gear and not getting as far as planned.

    Also it takes alot more water to float in then it does to run on step.
    Last edited by Dupont Spinner; 08-09-2007 at 21:01. Reason: another phrase of wisdom added.

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    Default Overloaded boat...

    LungShot,

    The max load rating on your boat is derived basically by adding weight to your (outboard-based) boat as it statically floats on still water (not underway) until water begins to come over the gunwales. Divide that weight by 5, and that's where the official placard # comes from. The formula is a little different for I/O & different size outboards, and it doesn't differentiate between jet/prop. What does that mean in real life...? It's just a starting framework for you as the operator to work from. Based on how you load, how you drive, and where you're headed, your personal boat's safe max load may be a bit higher or significantly lower.

    I wouldn't underestimate the Tanana or the Kantishna where you're headed. They're both relatively slow, but I'll guarantee ya, depending on water levels, (which can/does fluctuate significantly with rainfall) there's gonna be some "gotcha's" as ya head up & down river. A heavily loaded boat going in a straight line is pretty easy...a heavily loaded boat that has to make a sudden zig or zag to miss obstacles or because of a bad read on water depth can make for a short moose hunt with a bad ending. As mentioned earlier, test locally BEFORE ya commit to heading upriver. All of the questions of boat performance/handling/fuel burn/etc., should absolutely be tested/answered before ya ever hit Manley.

    If I do something dumb & avoidable & kill me...well, my wife's sad and rich...if I kill my son or my friend for the sake of getting a few more miles upriver or having extra creature comforts...not sure how I'd live with that...

    I'll be headed in that direction in a few weeks myself. I'll delay/end my hunt to help anyone on the river that's in trouble, but it'll be more fun for all of us if I just give ya the thumbs-up as we pass your camp that has bloody game bags hangin'. We'll be the ones in the 24' SeaArk/225 Evinrude with the scanoe on top...

    Best of luck to ya,

    Brian

  9. #9
    Member LungShot's Avatar
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    Default Brian

    Kantishna? Tanana? Whatever do you speak of? What rivers are those?

    Thanks for the good advice. I have been testing the boat alot this summer, and even with a thousand pounds the only difference I notice is the max speed drops. Other than that I really cant tell the diff between 5 guys, and 2 guys.

  10. #10
    Member AKBassking's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LungShot View Post
    Kantishna? Tanana? Whatever do you speak of? What rivers are those?
    Those would be Secret mountain, hidden valley!

    ALASKAN SEA-DUCTION
    1988 M/Y Camargue YachtFisher
    MMSI# 338131469
    Blog: http://alaskanseaduction.blogspot.com/

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    Not to fuel the fire....Just my thoughts

    I found that being as light as possible is always the best route. I would rather make 2 or 3 trips than be over weight.

    If your running rivers it could be a nightmare not only getting hung up in shallow water.....Your turns aren't as tight you could end up in the bank or worse yet water coming into the boat as it leans into the turns or when you throttle down water entering over the transom because of a lower water line.

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    Question yukon

    Just a little off the subject, anyone have info on the water level in the Yukon, Nowitna, or Koyukuk? As some of the others I might be headed that way in a few weeks.

  13. #13

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    Right now the water levels are high and rising.

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