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Thread: After the Shot

  1. #1
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    Default After the Shot

    So I've never field dressed, quartered, or packed out any big game animal. Everyone says all the work starts once you make the kill, but I've had a hard time finding a lot of quality information on this part. I know pretty much everyone on this site has this information and I'd sure appreciate some "How To", "Do's/Don'ts", Book Recommendations, or Websites.

    To save restating my question later, I have already acquired a lot of general steps. I'm looking for pretty detailed steps or pictures. I just don't want to ruin any meat or cut a trophy animal in a way that would ruin a mount.

    Areas of Interest:

    Where to make cuts for quartering.

    Where to make cuts for a shoulder mount.

    Skinning.

    Transporting/Preserving meat until I get it to the processor.


    Thanks for any advice you all have, and I'll be hunting Caribou first if you have anything specific for Caribou.

    Mike

  2. #2
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Default

    Check out this video on field care produced by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game. I haven't seen it, but have heard that it is a good resource.

    Will you be doing your first hunt solo or with other inexperienced hunters? Truly the best way to learn is by accompanying an experienced hunter into the field, even if it means volunteering your packing services and forgoing the shot in deference to your hunting buddy. I learned most of what I know by going along with those more experienced than myself, so if that is at all possible, that's what I would recommend.

  3. #3

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    I have found that most taxidermists will give you instruction on caping heads.
    You might call them in advance, and see when the best time would be.

  4. #4
    Member jeff p's Avatar
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    Default field care

    I might suggest Wilderness Taxiderminy from Pristine ventures http://www.pristineventures.com/prod...lications.html he has some great info & products out that will help you. The adfg video is a winner also.
    enjoy your hunt

  5. #5

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    I will second the wilderness taxidermy...just about everyone short of a taxidermist could benefit from this one. Sure going to make life easier!

  6. #6
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    Brian M

    I have several hunting partners lined up, all with experience. I'm just trying to learn as much as possible before the hunt...just in case.

    Thanks for the websites and advice, I'll be calling some taxidermists tomorrow and stopping by ADF&G. Any other advice is still welcome.

    Mike

  7. #7
    Member JustinW's Avatar
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    My dad and I have built a video over the past few years that covers the entire caping and skinning process for shoulder mounts, open skinning for rugs and the underutilized dorsal cut. Last i heard it was in the final editing stages.

    I want to do a part two on boning and packing. Most people mess up in the caping of their animal. First step in planning, think about it as part of your trip preparation. If you get a trophy do you want to mount it? If so, what sort of mount do you want? Consult with your taxidermist first and find out what any tricks might be for that species, what mistakes do guys make most often?

    One thing to note when hunting species with antlers or horns. A good taxidermist will use the eye sockets from the skull to make sure they have the right facial dimensions. Many don't use these and use the ones sculpted onto the form which may be much different than your animal. Ask your taxidermist if they do this, its a good way to judge the ability of your taxidermist and how your trophy might turn out.

    Check with the regulations for your area. My understanding is that Boning is not longer acceptable in some areas in Alaska, meat must be brought out bone in, including moose. I think this is pretty ridiculous but thats apparently what the rules are right now, that or a warden has a warped view of the law.

  8. #8
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    Default cutlery

    Have at least two small knives for field dressing. Mine have blades between 1 1/2 and 2 inches. Make sure they are of good quality and have some type of sharpener with you. My skinning knife has about a 3 inch blade with a good curve to the edge. All are very thin blades with very sharp edges.
    A good bone saw is a must as well.
    Hope this helps. Good hunting.
    Never give a gun to a duck...

  9. #9
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    I've also got to recommend the Fish and Game video. Step by step how to quarter a moose and care for it. I've watched 20 times. Pristine Ventures new Field Taxidermy video is outstanding. Boning out the quarters of moose is not allowed in GMU 9B, 17, 18, parts of 19A, 19B, meat also has to remain on the ribs as well as the quarters in GMU 21A, 21B, 21C, 21D, 21E, 23 and 24. The list for caribou is slightly different, GMU 21B to E does not require caribou to remain on the bone and 13 also requires the rib meat to remain on the bone. Page 18 of the hunting regs.

  10. #10
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    Default fillet method

    Here's a shot of a buddy and I using the fillet method of butchering a caribou. Much easier than gutting the animal first.

    http://picasaweb.google.com/dacks46e...44752604989810

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