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Thread: Transporting meat long distance

  1. #1

    Default Transporting meat long distance

    Has anyone had any experience transporting frozen meat for long distances/ I'm talking 4 days of driving. I was thinking of setting a chest freezer in a pickup truck with a generator supplying the power. At night I would use motels to keep the freezer going. Any thoughts/comments are greatly appreciated.

  2. #2
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    Default Chest Freezer with Generator

    Been doing that for many years while driving from Alaska down to the lower 48. Once the meat is frozen you should only need to run the generator a few hours a day. Folks down there look at you funny when you pull into a gas station with the generator running

  3. #3

    Default only two words

    Dry Ice once frozen nothing to it

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    Default

    I second the dry ice. I used to freeze deer meat in Texas. 4 days later, in Utah, I finally was able to break the quarters apart.

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    Default

    MMClaughlin had a good point. If your going to use a generator to run a freezer, don't run it the whole time, just enough to keep it frosty inside. After your long drive you don't want to spend another 4 days chipping at a block of meatcicles.

  6. #6
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Default Some observations about hauling a freezer along

    Kent Rotchy did this a while back and he said by the time he added it all up, he ended up saving money over shipping it.

    But with the tremendous increase in fuel costs the last three years, I'm curious whether this would still hold true. Anyone out there do that this last year? If so, how did the numbers line up for you?

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    Default Generator Gas v.s shipping cost

    Last year we filled the freezer up with moose meat (600lbs plus) and used between 5-6 gallons of gas in the generator to keep it cold. As said earlier, you don't want to run it the whole time and freeze it into a block of ice. A few hours a day is all you need. I would say if you where going to drive anyway, even with the price of gas the way it is, you'd come out way ahead. Now if it came down to flying up and shipping meat back versus driving up and back with a freezer then the numbers would be a lot closer but still in favor of driving back with all that tasty moose meat.

  8. #8

    Default Run freezer from batteries, charge while driving

    I have seen it done by running the freezer off of a couple of car batteries (with inverter) and charging the batteries from the truck while driving. This saves the generator gas and having the generator running at various times of the night. I guess it depends on whether you already have the generator or the batteries. Just another option to throw out there though.

  9. #9
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    Default Did it for fishing trip this year....

    I hauled my smaller chest freezer along in the truck twice this summer while on week long fishing trips. Worked great! I used my boat deep cycle battery and a 750W inverter (peak 1400W) that would run the freezer for about 4-5 hours. Inverter has auto shut-off when battery gets to around 10 or 11 amps. Then about 6-8 hours later (during the day) I would fire up the generator for about an hour and run the freezer from the generator and recharge the battery. Only had to run the generator for a total of 1-2 hours/day and kept fish frozen solid. Used very little gas in a Durapower 2000W generator, maybe 2-3 gallons.

    I'm thinking about taking it up North with me this year.... Works good for keeping things dry on the ride there also (tent, sleeping bag, etc). Had to come home couple days early last year to prevent spoiling meat during warm weather.

    AK_BigO

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