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Thread: Meat Care

  1. #1

    Default Meat Care

    If I have hired a guide and paid thousands of dollars who is responsable for meat care ??? Who is responsible for the game bags they have supplied ?? And for meat being left on ramp in the sun for a day ?? I'm sorry it is not the hunter but the guide they hired.You cannot make excuses like the game bag didnt let the air circulate.As the person in charge ypou should know your equement before the hunt.And know if there is a problem with the bage before you take to the field.As far as ramp issue it still rests in your responsibilty .Maybe someone should have stayed with the items until they were loaded and shipped.

    I'm sorry but when I read the post and the blame rests with the person that was hired for the trip.Proper meat care is the guides responsibilty .

    I hunt the lower 48 all the time in aug. in 100 degree temps.and have yet to lose meat that I have harvested due to improper care.The key is proper cooling and care .

  2. #2
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    Well, I think the law says the hunter is responsible for his meat. That means that if you don't know how the logistics work regarding meat transport, etc. you (the hunter) need to get that worked out ahead of time with your guide so you can take care of your meat according to the law. If you can't take care of your meat you've got no business pulling the trigger.

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  3. #3
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Snyd has it right. While the guide most certainly should take care of all the logistics and supplies concerning meat care, legally the responsibility rests with the hunter.

  4. #4

    Default My Two Cents, from Three Perspectives

    I'll give you my opinion from three perspectives: legal, ethical, and practical.

    From a legal standpoint, the hunter shares a significant part of the burden for ensuring that meat is properly cared for, so I'd check the regs on that to see what is the hunter's responsibility, and what is the guide's responsibility;

    From an ethical standpoint, I agree with Snyd, I believe it's our responsibility as hunters to ensure that we have a means for adequately caring for meat, beforee we pull the trigger;

    From a practical standpoint, I've been on 4 guided hunts in AK in the past 6 years, and was fortunate enough to harvest an animal (3 caribou, FINALLY one moose!) on each hunt. The manner in which the meat was handled was slightly different in each case, but one thing was consistent - I let each guide know up front that the meat was my priority, and that I was gonna be pretty adamant about proper meat care. While they all acknowledged this up front, on 3 of the 4 hunts I still felt compelled to comment during the harvest process, when I questioned whether what we were doing made the most sense from a meat care perspective.

    And FYI, I did have to explain the transfer of possession process to one of the guides....so don't be over-reliant on their knowledge in that area, it's not a safe assumption to make.

    Michael

  5. #5

    Default ??

    Maybe I am wrong to think if I am paying a guide 14,000 dollars That he is going to take care of the meat. I know that as a hunter you are responsible for the meat and I dont disagree with that.And if I am hunting by myself or with friends we will take care of the meat.And it will not spoil .

    I can just see it.You hire a guide for a week of hunting.Yow harvest a great Whatever then the guide says wheres your meat bags or whatever we dont do that oh yea you have to process all yourself I only guide you to the spot.And oh yea what about my tip

  6. #6
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Default Quick Question

    Quote Originally Posted by Robert2968 View Post
    If I have hired a guide and paid thousands of dollars who is responsable for meat care ??? Who is responsible for the game bags they have supplied ?? And for meat being left on ramp in the sun for a day ?? I'm sorry it is not the hunter but the guide they hired.You cannot make excuses like the game bag didnt let the air circulate.As the person in charge ypou should know your equement before the hunt.And know if there is a problem with the bage before you take to the field.As far as ramp issue it still rests in your responsibilty .Maybe someone should have stayed with the items until they were loaded and shipped.

    I'm sorry but when I read the post and the blame rests with the person that was hired for the trip.Proper meat care is the guides responsibilty .

    I hunt the lower 48 all the time in aug. in 100 degree temps.and have yet to lose meat that I have harvested due to improper care.The key is proper cooling and care .
    Hello Robert,

    What post are you referring to? Was it the one from last fall where I indicated that our meat sat out on the ramp in Aniak an extra day before the freight guys got it out of there? If so, I urge you to read it more closely. This was not a guided hunt. Though I am a registered guide, on this particular hunt I was taking a good friend of mine moose hunting. Hearing a lot about a new synthetic game bag that is on the market, I elected to do a side-by-side comparison between those bags and the cotton bags I've been using here in Alaska for nearly 20 years. While it is true that our meat sat on a pallet for a day longer than we planned (not our fault- it was the air freight company's error), the fact remains that the cotton bags out-performed the synthetics in this particular case. At any rate, I don't think you read through my post very well, if indeed it is my post to which you are responding.

    I will reiterate that in at least a couple of decades of big-game hunting in Alaska, I have never lost meat in the field to spoilage. Ever. I am a strong proponent of proper meat and trophy care and have taught this subject in outdoor shows for the last fifteen years.

    In that context, Robert, do you have a question for me?

    -Mike
    Last edited by Michael Strahan; 08-06-2007 at 17:18.
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
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    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  7. #7

    Default Bully for You

    Robert - if you hunt all the time in 100 degree temps, you probably have some good ideas that might be of benefit in caring for the meat of your trophy - why not share that info with the guide in case it proves useful?

    And the other thing - before you plunk down 14 large for ANY investment, it would behoove you to research your investment and ask a lot of pointed questions...since in this case we're talking about hunting, meat care questions would be one of the things I would discuss in detail before putting a deposit down! The less surprises the better, and you're less apt to be surprised if you ask a lot of questions up front, aboiut the things that are important to you.

    Good hunting,

    Michael

  8. #8

    Default Michael

    Michael,
    I enjoy reading your posts ,I have from the time I have been on this forum ,You gave a good post on floathunting just a couple of days ago .And it just hit me wrong.Talking about the bags and then blaming the ramp for not sending the meat on time.
    I agian would like to say I do enjoy your posts on this board and did not mean to offend if I did.

    The reason I said that about the ramp was I supply alot of Vessels going around the world and if I had something that did not reach the vessel .I can blame no one but myself,even though I may have done nothing wrong In the clients eyes I was the one responsable.

    I look forward to your book being out

    Robert

  9. #9
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Default Correction-

    Quote Originally Posted by Robert2968 View Post
    Michael,
    I enjoy reading your posts ,I have from the time I have been on this forum ,You gave a good post on floathunting just a couple of days ago .And it just hit me wrong.Talking about the bags and then blaming the ramp for not sending the meat on time.
    I agian would like to say I do enjoy your posts on this board and did not mean to offend if I did.

    The reason I said that about the ramp was I supply alot of Vessels going around the world and if I had something that did not reach the vessel .I can blame no one but myself,even though I may have done nothing wrong In the clients eyes I was the one responsable.

    I look forward to your book being out

    Robert
    Robert,

    There are a lot of details here that you do not know. To recap- I personally brought the meat to the cargo office myself and obtained their guarantee that it would go out on the next available flight, which was later that day. It was more than just a passing conversation. I spent about an hour there weighing, tagging, and generally caring for the meat, and obtaining several assurances that it would go out to Anchorage that day. Our passenger flight left before the cargo flight, so our intention was to arrive at the airport in Anchorage, drive over to the cargo terminal and collect our meat that same day. As I said I have been doing this for twenty years with no mishaps. We arrived in Anchorage, went to the freight office and discovered that though there was indeed meat on the aircraft, it was not ours. In fact, it was meat that had arrived in Aniak AFTER ours was assured a slot. It was an error on the part of the cargo outfit. The only other thing we could have done differently would have been to cancel our tickets home, hang around in Aniak and help the guys load our meat on the aircraft. This would have put us in Anchorage a couple of days later. Oh wait... that wouldn't work either, because there would have been nobody in Anchorage to babysit it when it arrived there either!

    At some point you have to trust a service provider to deliver on their promises. If they don't, you don't do business with them in the future. I have not posted the name of the company in this thread, but you can bet I will think long and hard before I recommend them or do business with them again.

    None of this is irresponsible behavior on my part, and if, after receiving this information, you and I still disagree, well, we'll just have to disagree. One thing you did miss though. The meat in the cotton bags was fine. The meat in the synthetics was nearly lost to spoilage, according to my meat processor. I suppose you could question his qualifications too, but there is no question that the meat in the synthetics didn't fare nearly as well as the meat in cotton bags. That's a fact that should cause one to pause and at least consider why. That was the whole point of the account I wrote.

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  10. #10
    Member schmidty_dog's Avatar
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    Mike, you're releasing a book? Let me know if and when, I'd be interested in it. I also enjoy your posts.

    schmidty

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