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Thread: Foot care/maintenance

  1. #1
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    Default Foot care/maintenance

    I am posting this in hopes of getting some new ideas on foot care before and in the field. Proper boot fit is important but what other measures do you take so that your feet don't hurt. I know a problem that I have is not with blisters but with my feet feeling like they've been pounded with hammers after a really long day of hiking.

    I treat mine with Kerasol (sp?) which is a foot cream used to soften callouses and also wear socks at night. What do yall do?

  2. #2
    Member KRS's Avatar
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    Your feet need to breathe. A thick foot cream wouldn't be my first choice. I want my feet dry and breathing at night.

    Take along moleskin for blisters. Change socks daily.

    As you stated, your boots need to fit... but just as importantly they need to be broken in and worn frequently.

    If you need a foot arch support, then slip on in there in place of the footbed that came with the boot.

    Ibuprofen before bed

    Do it over the next day.

  3. #3
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    My feet are weird in the fact that they sweat a whole lot when covered by dry out really quick when exposed. If I walk around in sandals a lot and don't put anything on my feet the skin gets really dry and tough and I can peel off my entire heel pad (It's fun to do it in front of the wife). I do agree with changing socks often and letting them dry out, I just can't let them dry the entire night.

    The foot cream is like vaseline too, it absorbs pretty quickly.

  4. #4
    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
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    In general, I walk around barefoot as much as possible when at home--it helps toughen your feet and I wear my hunting boots regularly throughout the year and keep my toenails trimmed correctly.

    Pre-hunt, I trim the nails so I won't have to mess with them while afield.

    On the hunt: I carry clean socks for every day I'll be out. Some feel this is excessive but it's what works for me. I also carry spare insoles so I can swap them out every day, and I carry an old pair of moccassins to wear in camp. As soon as I'm back to camp my boots come off so they can air out. Lastly I carry about a handful's worth of foot powder in a gallon ziploc bag. I "shake 'n bake" my feet before going to bed. The bag keeps the powder from getting on everything.

    Blisters? I don't get them anymore. If I feel a hot spot coming on, I stop, take my boots off and check out my feet. A piece of duct tape usually does the trick.

  5. #5
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Other than a few extra pairs of dry Smartwools and boots that fit well, I don't worry about my feet. I haven't had a blister since I went rollerskating in the 3rd grade. My wife won't touch my hard-as-rocks feet, but they sure are good for hiking!

  6. #6
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    Applying rubbing alchohol morning and night for a while toughens up the skin.

    Foot care is kind of like meat care. Keep em cool, clean and dry!

    My feet sweat like crazy but good socks and well fitting boots along with foot beds help. Hiking with weight also helps with muscles from the knees down.
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

  7. #7
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    Since I ride my ATV to my campsite and have lots of gear with me over there, I wash and dry my feet at night before going to bed, and then sprinkle some Gold Bond foot powder on my feet, followed by wearing a clean and dry pair of socks to avoid getting powder all over the sleeping bag. However, if it's warm that night I just wash and dry my feet, and go to bed without socks.

    I do some of the things mentioned by all of you here, too. I also have in my tent a tube of Neosporin, as well as an anti-fungal cream just in case my feet or toes itch. When being in the field for awhile under moist conditions, it's possible for bacteria to grow on the nail edges by your fingertips. Soon enough the skin will crack and hurt, and that's where Neosporin becomes important. It's a good idea to have a tube of Tinactin or similar anti-attlete's foot medicine handy, just in case.

    Another product I keep with me at the campsite is some hand disinfectant such as Purell, which I rub my hands with after washing them with soap and water.
    ------

    Now, going back to feet: I avoid cotton socks as much as possible, and wear synthetic, or the new wool/synthetic blends of today, and let my feet air-out whenever possible. If my feet start sweating too much, then I wear uninsulated boots and warm weather socks.

    Like others have said, I only wear roomy boots. Nothing worst than wearing boots that constrict blood flow and air movement to your feet and toes.

  8. #8
    Member lvfire's Avatar
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    Default Sore feet..

    As a long time Paramedic and marathon runner/hunter with occasional foot problems. Sounds more like a deep tissue, and not surface problem with your feet. Try 600mg Ibuprophen (Advil) if it is bone/muscle. Or a couple Naproxen (Aleve) for muscle pain. The advil will also work for skin/surface discomfort as it is a great anti-inflammatory.

  9. #9
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    Default stopping blisters with tape

    as Eric in Alaska said, a piece of "duck" tape works wonders. Looks like everyone else passes this short comment up. Walking the Chilkoot one year I saw a couple military boys go by, just smoking up the trail. That night I stopped and visited with them. They had no blisters, but had their feet taped up with duct tape in the critical places. Said that they learned to use it on marches. Since then I have tried it numerous times with great success. I also carry moleskin for those times I do get blisters, and "Second skin" for the really bad ones, though it disolves if/when your feet get wet. Until then, it makes really bad blisters just disappear from the pain radar.

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