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Thread: First Timer - Technique for Kenai/Russian Reds?

  1. #1
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    Default First Timer - Technique for Kenai/Russian Reds?

    Hi all,

    We'll be staying for the first time at the Russian River campground from Aug 12-14th. I've caught sockeye in Kodiak before with a spinning rod, but want to use my 8 wt to catch my first salmon on a fly rod.

    Any suggestions about the difference in fly fishing technique for the Russian River versus the Kenai confluence?
    -Setup: 9' 8 wt WF floating line with straight fluorocarbon or mono leader.
    How long and long a leader should I use for the Russian versus the Kenai? About how much split shot and how far should it be above the fly?

    -Yarn flies, ESL's or Russian River Coho flies?

    -What's the best technique to consistently hook 'em in the mouth? This is what I've done before when sightfishing at the Buskin river: cast out at 11 o'clock, let it drift to 2' o'clock, then slowly pull 2 feet of line with my left hand to swing the fly across the mouth of the fish.

    -How does it differ at the Kenai with the faster and deeper flow and all the silt?

    Thanks for all your help! Looking forward to visiting your great state.

  2. #2
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    I like cheap coho flies. I use a floating line with 6-8' of Maxima 12-15# mono leader. Splitter total weight depends on the depth and current speed where you're standing. It'll vary, go prepared. I like the weight about 24" above the fly. Again it depends on the drift. The basic toss and return technique is the same in every river. The Russian is relatively small and clear so you'll be sight fishing. It is not a slow stream, which helps when fishing reds. See 'em, catch 'em. The primary difference you'll find between your spinning gear and fly gear is feel. Watch what other people are doing. If you see somebody that looks like he knows what he's doing (and is catching fish), watch and learn. Once you get the rhythm down you'll have a blast.

  3. #3
    Member fishnngrinn's Avatar
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    I like sinking line with about 3 ft leader. No split shot needed for many runs, therefore, less snag ups. Deeper holes will need more weight, be prepared to alter presentation for conditions. For the kenai a heavy sink, eg, "chuck and duck" will fare well in the current. I use Russian River fly, color not important, but bright green is easier to see in the Russian River when casting for an identified fish.

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