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Thread: Goat Hunter's need some tips

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    Default Goat Hunter's need some tips

    I'm going goat hunting this Fall and was wondering if you guys have any tips? Here in BC where I live its a Draw system and it took me along time to get this draw so any help would be awesome. Anyone got some cool pic's to share thanks

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    Cramp-ons...take them! Congrats on your tag and good luck with the hunt.


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    Thats a beauty of a goat ... I hope to take one like that thanks It took 15 yrs to get the draw goodthing the draw is from Sept 10 till Nov 30. thanks again for posting the pic' gets the blood flowing LOL! What did it score?

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    Once you get up high, look more than walk. Going up is easier than coming down. Sometimes you can go up into a spot that you can't come down from. Keep your feet under you. In the snow, look for the trails, then the goats are easy to see. Billies are much deeper in the chest than nannies so you can tell which is which from a distance. Billies also have larger and broader faces. Good luck. J.

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    Member AK NIMROD's Avatar
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    good quality mountain boots, i use koflach plastic boots, gaiters ( gets real exciting when crampons catch pant leg coming down mountain with 120# pack, voice of experience)
    4 point crampons, (i have 12 point crampons but do not feel they are needed for most goat hunts), long handle mtn. axe and 175 foot of rope- i would not go after goats without these safety items. put crampons on way before you really feel they are needed. esp when packing goat out.
    no expert but i have fair amount of experience.
    *i have hunted goats on 15+ hunts and been part of taking 7-8 goats
    Personally i have only taken a young billy(with rifle, we took 3 that day) as most of my hunts have been archery for myself.

    *i would say hunt as late in the season as you can so the hair is longer. down side is worse weather and can be more dangerous. Trophy is the hair as far as i'm concerned since there really is not alot of horn difference between nice, good and great goat.
    *DO NOT do a shoulder mount. i would say do a rug, unless you have room to display life size. 1/2 life size are very nice as well.
    goats tend to initially move down with new snow then will travel back up or into old growth forest.
    *goats can not count- if they spot you and your buddy have buddy mill around and you get out of sight and close the distance , do not approach from directly below. they can let you get suprisingly close sometimes if approached form side.
    *spot them early and they tend to lay down around 10am and will basically stay there till 2 ish, plenty of time to get into postion for close look.
    *hiking up i frequently wear only boots, long johns and nylon running shorts so i do not over heat. sets real fashion statement i will have rain gear and /or light jacket easily accessable to put on during breaks if needed.
    *carry plenty of water(camelback are great) also hard candy or small candy bars for easy small quick snack for energy.
    *also leather gloves to help protect hands especially from devils club, don't know if you have that in BC
    * safety glasses to wear traveling in brush....had friend get hit in eye and could not see well enough out of injuried dominent eye to shoot goat with his bow, that he got within 20 yards of.
    good luck, be safe , hopefully my health will allow me to hunt, my favorite game animal again. planning to try next year will be nearly 60 by then. amazing how tall the mountains are getting and how heavy the packs are.
    Last edited by AK NIMROD; 08-05-2007 at 15:12. Reason: ADD PHOTO
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    Unhappy taller mountains and heavier packs

    Yup, been noticing the same phenomenon recently - good luck this year. jb

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    Cool Post .. ya I was trying to get up to where I have my draw this past week but the Fire's down here have the Highway closed so my scouting will have to wait, lots of times you can see them from the bush road. I see these goats every year for over 15 yrs when I;m Deer Hunting, a few yrs back we took some big cats out of the area this really helped out the goats so there should be some nice shooter's in there. .... I'll probaly get a Rug Done as for a mount. Myself and My Wife both have the draw .... should be a blast for the both of us as its just her secand year out in the Field hunting... ... thanks for the post and sharing the nice Goat's picture's. cheers!

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    Plan for the worst so you can enjoy the best. When clouds settle in on a mountain they can stick around for days, and within the cloud you're probably talking wind and rain, if not snow. It's pretty easy to get separated from your camp overnight, if not for several days if you don't carry a good GPS and use it to keep track of your routes. We always carry a very basic spike camp on our hikes, and more than once it has saved the day.

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    Member Dan W's Avatar
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    My addition would be to give some thought when the time comes to where the goat is, and where he might likely be after you shoot him. Make sure you are at least comfortable recovering him where he's at, and potentially hundreds of yards down the mountain. It really doesn't take as much slope as you'd think - if they get just one little roll from there they gain steam and next thing you know you're watching your billie doing summersaults through the air as he goes down a thousand vertical feet into the next drainage. Trust me I know.

    Agree that the hair it the best part of the trophy. Full/half and rug make nice mounts, but depending on where you plan to hang it and your budget I wouldn't completely discount a shoulder mount. But if you want a shoulder mount, cape him WAY back so you can get pretty much his full shoulder into the mount.

  10. #10

    Default Rug

    When skinning for a rug, do you use the same cut lines as on a bear? If I skin for a rug, I imagine I can still do a 3/4 mount if I change my mind?
    "Everything that lives and moves will be food for you. Just as I gave you the green plants, I now give you everything."

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    I second Nimrod's advice.
    Get above them if you can--they are surprisingly tolerant of approach from above so getting inside rifle range is not difficult.

    Be careful of the terrain when choosing the moment to shoot...both your's and the goat's. No point in shooting if you get to the goat safely or recover him after the shot. If you can try and catch them on a bench, wide ridge top or crossing a saddle. Basically just someplace where they won't plunge off hundreds (thousands) of feet of cliff face.

    Bring a small bow saw on the pack in for getting through the alder band. And bring flagging tape for marking your back trail from treeline to valley floor.
    Sidehilling through 200 yards of dense alders with a loaded pack because you missed your backtrail and emerged from the brush a top a cliff is not fun.....(wanna guess how I know??)
    Don't forget to pull your tape on your way out

    Good luck.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Erik in AK View Post
    I second Nimrod's advice.
    Get above them if you can--they are surprisingly tolerant of approach from above so getting inside rifle range is not difficult.

    Be careful of the terrain when choosing the moment to shoot...both your's and the goat's. No point in shooting if you get to the goat safely or recover him after the shot. If you can try and catch them on a bench, wide ridge top or crossing a saddle. Basically just someplace where they won't plunge off hundreds (thousands) of feet of cliff face.

    Bring a small bow saw on the pack in for getting through the alder band. And bring flagging tape for marking your back trail from treeline to valley floor.
    Sidehilling through 200 yards of dense alders with a loaded pack because you missed your backtrail and emerged from the brush a top a cliff is not fun.....(wanna guess how I know??)
    Don't forget to pull your tape on your way out

    Good luck.

    Thanks, I'll take all this in account for my trip, I don't want the goat to fall at all LOL! but we'll see, I sure hope to get one while its on the Bench and not a Cliff. I'll post some pic's of the area once I get up there after the fire's are out LOL! thanks Guys excellent info here for me.

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    Member AK NIMROD's Avatar
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    they are tough to knock down and keep down. they will launch themselves off a cliff. and i have heard of young health goats following, jumping to their death as well.
    use a heavy caliber.
    sent you a PM
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    Great Pictures guys, I always enjoy seeing goat pic's.

    Here is one i just finished the base work on.
    Attached Images Attached Images

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    nice looking mount.......love those pantaloons
    RETIRED U.S.A.F. CAPT.; LIFETIME MEMBER NRA; LIFETIME MEMBER ALASKA BOWHUNTER ASSOC.
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    Quote Originally Posted by harterstaxidermy View Post
    Great Pictures guys, I always enjoy seeing goat pic's.

    Here is one i just finished the base work on.
    Very Nice Mount!!! whats something like that run a guy in price? Keep the awesome pic's coming guys ..... now if I could just skip this month and get to it and search out that Billy!

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    PICTURE OF THE RUG MOUNT OF MY LITTLE BILLY
    RETIRED U.S.A.F. CAPT.; LIFETIME MEMBER NRA; LIFETIME MEMBER ALASKA BOWHUNTER ASSOC.
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    Quote Originally Posted by AK NIMROD View Post
    PICTURE OF THE RUG MOUNT OF MY LITTLE BILLY

    Simply Awesome!!!!! I'm going crazy here guys!!!!! very very nice indeed!! I love the rams too....

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    When making a goat rug, what do you do as far as curing the hooves? Like on a bear, you have to remove the toe bones that lead up to the claws. Is there anything special about the process involved with a goat?

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    JohnS- thanx, sheep are old trophies and the larger ,38x40, is my son's (he was 13 when he rifled that one, day after he missed 42-44" class ram with his bow, 50 mph crosswind) would have been wr and probably still would be
    i don't recall anything special that was done to hooves, i know i did not do anything, just skinned it down all the way and got the meat and bones out.
    picture with the 3 on the boat, cabin of boat is 8 foot wide so that big guy with no horns spread is over 8 feet he was a monster, probably would have died that winter. lost his horns before my buddy shot him. most goats measure about 8" from nose to horns....he was 13.
    RETIRED U.S.A.F. CAPT.; LIFETIME MEMBER NRA; LIFETIME MEMBER ALASKA BOWHUNTER ASSOC.
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