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Thread: Certified!

  1. #1
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    Default Certified!

    Passed the shooting portion of the test tonight! Looks like moose season opens friday
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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    Default Right on!

    Way to go! Congrats! All of us Instructors like hearing about people's successes both in the class on the the shooting portion of the IBEP program. It bodes well for you that you accomplished your goal.
    Good luck with your bowhunting. Just remember, no matter where you are, one of us may be watching. (proudly)

  3. #3
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    Default

    Thanks! I only missed one shot the whole time! Now to shoot some broadheads and get them tuned in.
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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    Default Nervous

    I remember taking the class with a buddy. We were the "pups" in the group. Some of those guys really talked the talk. They knew all there was to bowhunting. Tons of experience, and more ideas than NASA.
    The closer the time came to going outside for the shoot, the more jittery he and I became. Butterflies just don't do justice to what was going on in our bellies. Maybe more in line with ruff grouse blowing leaves on takeoff in the birch woods.
    So out the door and to the range we went. Got dressed and grabbed our gear. They had a practice target to warm up with, so we politely stepped back and let the journeymen do their thing. They walked to the line and started guessing yardage. 20yd, no 30 yds, no 40 yds, no 15 yds were some of the guesses, then the shooting commenced. One guy lost 3 arrows in the grass. That was all the shafts he had with him. Arrows in the butt, arrows in the ear. Rear leg, paunch, front leg, and the occasional kill zone all received a spattering of arrows.
    We looked at each other more confused than when we started. Ok, our turn. We walked to the line and promptly put 5 arrows apiece in the kill zone at an even 20 yards. Hmm, that wasn't so tough.
    Off to the range we go, following the gurus, the all knowing. First guy on the black bear misses both shots. The only thing that saves his arrows is there is no grass behind the bear so he finds them, but is done for the day.
    The whole day progressed pretty much the same. A few guys really shot well, most shot ok, and a few, well, suffice it to say if you were bigger than an elepahant you were pretty safe. This was all back when range finders were forbidden. My buddy and I kept to ourselves, talking and giving support after the shot. We abided by all the rules and never shared info prior to a shot. He may have missed one kill zone, I shot 100%.
    To this day I don't think the test is too hard, in fact I would like to see a more stringent standard set, but guess that is another thread.
    Every time I go out as an instructor I learn something new from one of the students. It is one of the reasons I keep coming back.

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    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Congratulations

    Congratulations! You have taken a first step. Now to become a bow hunter. It will take you some time to accomplish that. You will need to ask a lot of questions and that is why we are here as instructors. You have at least 4-5 instructors on this forum including myself.

    For instance: Tuning your broadheads. Yes you can tune broadheads to a degree, but if you are not hitting at the same POI as your field points, it is probably a bow tuning problem.

    Take a piece of cardboard and draw a + on it with a 2" circle in the center. Shoot three field points to see where you are hitting. You should be on at 20 yards. Then shoot three broadheads. Do they hit to the same POI. If not, let us know where they are hitting. Discount fliers, numbering arrows helps, you may have a broadhead that needs tuning. If one arrow constantly hits out of the group retire it to a field point. Do this several times until you establish a pattern. For example: If all broadheads are hitting low, then you need to lower your knocking point.

    Let us know how you do.

    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ak River Rat View Post
    %.
    To this day I don't think the test is too hard, in fact I would like to see a more stringent standard set, but guess that is another thread.
    I fully agree that the test should be harder. In effect, by only requiring 5 out of 8 shots to be in the kill zone, what we are saying is that it is OK to wound 3 of 8 animals. Well, that may be a stretch, but really....within 40 yards, certified bowhunters should be more accurate than that if we care about making clean kills.

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    Cool

    many years ago when I passed the test, there was a lot of discussion among the bowhunters about having shooting proficiency be part of the test. arguements against included but were not limited to - some hunters never shot at an animal over 20 yards so why should they have to shoot 30 yards at targets. also discussed was - a person could practice for a month with a high tech bow, with sights, release, rangefinder and pass the test, then never shoot again until they went hunting and possibly not hit a thing.
    just like test takers in school - some people don't relax very well when others are watching - but put them in their comfort zone and they are deadly.

    arguments for included demonstrating that you could shoot accurately enough at the time of the test to pass the test. I know of some people who could not pass the test with their own bow, so borrowed a buddy's that had sights and a release and then passed. What are these people going to be shooting when they go into the field?

    when I read about people taking 50 to 70 yard shots (and longer) it makes me think that they are missing out on a great part of the bowhunting experience - that is getting extremely close to the animal.

    maybe there should be different shooting qualifications for archers shooting without all of the high tech gear - the sights, rangefinders, releases, etc.

  8. #8
    Member bushrat's Avatar
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    Default question

    I'm not up to speed on the IBEP test. If you are shooting a traditional bow, what is the max range they test you at? Do you shoot at a target or a 3d figure? After Brian's comments, I'm not sure...but I do know that I wouldn't be shooting out to 40 yds with my setup.
    Thanks, (and PS, congrats Patrick)

  9. #9
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Default

    Mark, when I took the test (about 10 years ago), I think the furthest target was 30 yards. There were four 3-D targets. You had to shoot two arrows at each, one from a standing and one from a kneeling position. You had to hit each target in the kill zone at least once, and 5 out of 8 total. There was one target with a steep downhill angle, but the others were flat. With a compound bow it was not difficult at all with a bit of practice, but I can't speak for those using traditional gear.

    Have things changed, or is this still the basic setup for the test?

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    Default anymore graduates?

    I did not mean for this thread to shift to the test itself. This was a great opportunity to congratulate people who have successfully navigated the classroom and shooting portion of the test. Sorry for taking the conversation elsewhere.
    As an instructor I appreciate feedback, input, and successes by all students. So again, KUDOS to the most recent graduates. I hope that your bowhunting endeavors meet your defintions of success. I also hope that you are able to come back and join the ranks of the instructor cadre to pass on in your own way all that is positive about bowhunting.
    What do you say instructors? Hip Hip HOORAY!

  11. #11
    Member crossfoxAK's Avatar
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    Default Certified

    Since I Was Certified As A Bowhunter I Have Not Hunted With A Rifle One Time. I Have Shot A Bear And A Caribou Since Last Year With A Bow. This Year I Am Going For Sheep And Moose. And I Did Bag Another Black Bear This Spring. I Am Completely Hooked And Have A Range In My Back Yard. The Only Problem I Have Is That You Can Hunt With A Bow During Rifle Season Or Any Other Regular Season Without Being Certified. It Totally Contradicts Itself. Why Should You Have To Take A Test For Proficiency For A Short Bow Season. What If Someone Goes Bowhunting During Rifle Season And Wounds Several Animals. I Just Do Not Agree With This.

  12. #12
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    test is about the same only the yardage is between about 10 and 22 yards with the one elevated shot at a black bear at 10 yards. There was one guy with a trad bow who missed the long shot by inches so my instructor gave him the benifit of the doubt and called it a hit. In my group the black bear had a 3 inch grouping with the entire shooting group of 5 except me my two arrows were in the ten ring on the bear (which was probably a bit low) it was pretty impressive.

    I wanna do some more 3d shoots before I try something deer sized although I'm 100% sure I could kill a moose within 35 yards providing my bow is tuned well enough that it'll shoot broadheads as well as feild points.
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  13. #13
    Member lab man's Avatar
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    Default remember the past

    Crossox questioned being able to hunt with a bow during rifle season. Back in the day, bohunters got together and championed the state to come up with "restricted hunt" areas. Ie, bow only. We did not talk about seasons as much as the areas to hunt that precluded firearms hunting for specific animals.
    It was us, the hunters that predominantely set the restrictions, rules, and regulations in an attempt to self govern bowhunting and by doing so to encourage the state to meet our needs.
    Today, any restricted area, and now in some places restricted seasons, require specific training and passing of tests. The hope was that bowhunters would see the benefit of taking a course and not having to compete with firearms hunters. The same can be said for the special muzzle loader hunts.
    Yes, there are a few of us that have chosen not to take the course and they do hunt general seasons in open take areas. I do not have the data to extrapolate that information into a higher wound rate, nor do I know anybody that does.
    As for short seasons, yes, in some areas Crossfox is correct. But in many areas there are long seasons and/or multiple seasons. More opportunities exist today for restricted take hunting than back when we first started.
    I can only suggest that if people feel seasons are not long enough or other changes are prudent, that they become active and initiate proposals to the board committee and BOG. We have found that a positive way to do that is to encourage earlier and later seasons so as not to conflict with traditional open take/methods seasons.

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    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
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    I just got done with the first day of the classroom portion of the course. Can someone shoot me a link of the listed shoots I can attend to complete the certification?

  15. #15
    Member HuntKodiak's Avatar
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    Default Congrats!

    Congrats! You have now entered into a new world of fun. If you do your part to get ready, which it sounds like you are, then you will face the challenges and joys of bow hunting.

    I never took the course until last year because I hadn't needed to in other states, and I hadn't planned on applying for special hunts. But now that I will stay in Alaska and will apply for hunts, I too took the course, and was glad I did. I took some nuggets away from the classroom, and I got to feel the pressure of the shoot. I was doing great, but the last target was a goat steep uphill through some brush at about 25 - 30 yards (two different shooting locations). Even though I thought about compensating for the uphill shot, I goofed and used the wrong pin, plus, I flinched. Darn goat had a really sore front knee! Then the pressure came in a bit. Boy I didn't want to be embarrased by failing the course because I screwed up the last target when all others went like a piece of cake. So kneeling in mud, shooting over a limb, I let the arrow fly......whew, thank god I put it in the boiler room. All that and I was only shooting at a target. Funny and fun stuff.

    Once again, congrats and have fun. Glad to see the tuning help offered too. That's terrific!

    Mike

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    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hunt_ak View Post
    I just got done with the first day of the classroom portion of the course. Can someone shoot me a link of the listed shoots I can attend to complete the certification?
    http://www.wildlife.alaska.gov/index...type=bowhunter

    every one of these classes you can shoot or reshoot
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  17. #17
    Member Dan in Alaska's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ak_powder_monkey View Post
    Passed the shooting portion of the test tonight! Looks like moose season opens friday
    AKPM, Did you take the class in Anchorage? I took the Anchorage class Aug 1st and 2nd and also passed. I am a bowhunting newbie, and I really enjoyed the class. All three instructors (Tim, Bernie, and Jack) had good stuff to offer.

    For what it's worth, a friend of mine was visiting from Wisconsin the week I took the class. He wished Wisconsin had a bowhunting class that required a shooting portion, like AK does. He's been bowhunting a long time, so I picked his brain while he was here as well.

    I'm heading up to the haul road with a friend tomorrow. Going to give this "string gun" stuff a whirl. Should be a good time.

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