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Thread: Sheep Horns + Cape On Carry On

  1. #1
    Member FALCON's Avatar
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    Default Sheep Horns + Cape On Carry On

    I saw this post on another forum. Assuming I could fit it in a duffle small enough, will Alaska Airlines allow it. If not, Am I better off shipping it home, or have it as a checked bag and hope they don't lose it?

    Thanks,

    Bryan

  2. #2

    Default Too big

    The ram you're going to kill will be way too big to fit as a carry-on. It might even be over the 50 lb checked baggage max. You could have a taxidermists picked out here and take it there before heading home. They'll crate it up and ship it to you when it's done or expedite it to the taxidermist of your choice in Washington.

  3. #3
    Member FALCON's Avatar
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    Default LOL

    FC:

    You are too funny!

    I can only hope!

    I ended up calling TSA at the Fairbanks Airport. They said no can do.
    The sheep horns could be used as a weapon! Oh well. If I score a ram, I will pickup a LARGE cooler and put it on as checked luggage and hope it doesn't end up in China!

  4. #4
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    Default

    Boy, I sure wouldn't want to take a chance on the hide slipping if you get a mounter. Might be a better idea to make arrangements like FC suggested unless you can freeze it here and keep it frozen until you get it home to the taxi. It would have to be frozen if you are going to take it back on the plane.
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

  5. #5

    Default

    If I were you I would get the cape to Alpha Furs (Anchorage) and have them tan it and then mail it to you. You should be able to get the horns home in checked baggage. Make sure you wrap the skull (cap) up real good in newspaper and duct tape.

  6. #6
    Member AK145's Avatar
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    Default Yea but...

    Quote Originally Posted by Fullcurl View Post
    The ram you're going to kill will be way too big to fit as a carry-on. It might even be over the 50 lb checked baggage max. You could have a taxidermists picked out here and take it there before heading home. They'll crate it up and ship it to you when it's done or expedite it to the taxidermist of your choice in Washington.
    FC's not joking...this is the best idea you could do. There are some great taxidermists in the Fairbanks area that mount a lot of sheep. I would leave it here in good hands and then not have to worry about it.

  7. #7
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    When I got back to Anchorage from my Sheep hunt I went to Walmart and purchased one of those plastic tubs. I put my horns and cape in the tub and backed clothing and news paper. Using duct tape I sealed the tub and using a permement magic marker placed my name and address on the tub. I checked the tub as additional baggage and it cost an additional $50. No problems...

  8. #8
    Member spoiled one's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FALCON View Post
    FC:

    You are too funny!

    I can only hope!

    I ended up calling TSA at the Fairbanks Airport. They said no can do.
    The sheep horns could be used as a weapon! Oh well. If I score a ram, I will pickup a LARGE cooler and put it on as checked luggage and hope it doesn't end up in China!
    At the very minimum, you should make sure the cape has been dried and then Fed Ex, UPS, or 2nd day air it. I am assuming that this will be a guided hunt, so you will be paying big dollars. Why risk it? Have a local taxidermist
    take care of it and ship it down to you. This could be a once in a life time trophy.

    On a side note, I shot my 1st ram on day 3 of the hunt and packed the head and drying cape on my back for another 30 miles in search of a ram for my partner. The meat was hung high in a spruce tree near the air strip. Necessary? Probably not, but I was not going to risk a wolverine packing my first ram away!
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

  9. #9

    Talking No worry?

    Quote Originally Posted by AK145 View Post
    FC's not joking...this is the best idea you could do. There are some great taxidermists in the Fairbanks area that mount a lot of sheep. I would leave it here in good hands and then not have to worry about it.
    Have it mounted in Alaska...then worry about the completed mount arriving safely, without damage. The taxidermist could do a great job, but he hasn't any control of how the freight handlers take care of it. and there's still a slight possibility of losing it. I'd go with Jimmy Urban's recommendations...that'd be my choice.
    If you like getting kicked by a mule...then you'll "love" shooting my .458.

  10. #10
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    Default

    I shot a nice ram in 2005 and took the cape in to Alpha Fur Dressers. They also offered to take care of the horns (removing them and cleaning off the meat from the skull plate). I decided to take the horns home with me in checked baggage....mainly because I wanted to have them to show to friends. Imagine my dismay when I got to Idaho and my checked bags did not! I was assured my bags would be in on the next flight, but they weren't. Didn't come in the next day either. I was really beginning to regret my decision to put them in checked baggage, but they finally came in on the second day. I highly advise you to let the professionals in AK, either a taxidermist or a tannery, take care of them. I don't know what one could even do it the horns were lost in baggage.

  11. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tater View Post
    I don't know what one could even do it the horns were lost in baggage.
    You risk a certain level of losing your horns either to the postman or the baggage handler. Only safe bet is to drive them home yourself and even then there is a risk.

    A few years ago we had a set of horns swiped from our remote spike camp. To this day my pard and I are unsure if the culprit was man or beast.

  12. #12
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    Default Carry On

    This is just one of the many things you'll need to have go your way during your hunt but that's what makes it so special! I have carried sheep horns home on the plane in a med sized cheap duffle bag twice in the last few years. There was some resistance from one of the TSA inspectors last Sept but a supervisor gave me a go with no problem. Unless you are positive that sheep horns are a specifically prohibited item, I'd at least try to carry them on and then be prepared to pack them as excess checked baggage only after the highest ranking TSA person around has said no. It's suprising how much judgement is involved with such a decision and everyone is looking to cover their butt. A reasonable discussion with a supervisor can make all of the difference. Good luck Falcon!

    Alpine

  13. #13

    Default

    I can appreciate everyones concern about getting their trophy home safely. A dried sheep cape weighs little. The skull cap with horns will probably go fifteen, twenty pounds tops. I've brought home both from Alaska as checked baggage. The horns went into a medium sized duffle. I packed some clothes, laundry, etc around them. The dried cape went into a small grain sack. This too went into a small duffle. Both were then placed into a larger duffle with some of my other clothes, equipment, etc. to bring the total weight up to fifty pounds. It's important that the horns and cape be clean and dry. Unless you tag a ram at the very last hour of your hunt this shouldn't be a problem as there will have been ample time in camp for things to dry out. Make sure that you have the necessary papers on your person that document the legality of the kill (i.e. license, sealing papers, etc.).

    Of course, this is something we all worry about when travelling. It's a relief when you finally unpack your gear and find everything has arrived home safely. Ultimately though, you have to make a decision as to how you will get your trophy home.

    Good luck, I'll catch up with you when you get home.

  14. #14
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    Default

    I too have twice placed sheep horns in my carry-on duffle like Alpine did. Both times the TSA guy at the X-ray monitor called over his coworker to look, but nary a word was said to me. They don't fit well under the seat in front of you, but with a little corkscrew action they can be twisted in to make the stewardess happy.

    My departure city both times was Anchorage.

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