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Thread: sloshing compound in airplane floats ?

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    Member Roger's Avatar
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    Default sloshing compound in airplane floats ?

    I'm looking for a sloshing compound they use in airplane floats to stop leaks , Anybody know the name of it or a company that sells it ?
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  2. #2

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    I was interested in this too, and from google, it seems they simply call it sloshing compound, and one page said Spruce sells it, the closest i could find on their page was a sealant for gas tanks

    link is below

    http://www.aircraftspruce.com/catalo.../sloshcoat.php

    looks like it would work great in floats

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    Member AK-HUNT's Avatar
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    Default I'll look...

    I've got a can in the shop. Will look, but I believe what I have is Randolph and it came from Stoddards if memory serves...........but it usually doesn't.

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    Default

    Randolph used to make a couple different sloshing sealers. I believe they discontinued them. Liability for flaking sealers in the fuel system probably scared them away.

    Both of my floats leak a little in the main compartments. I looked for sloshing sealants but haven't done anything because I don't think I can clean the float interiors well enough to allow the sealer to work. I've heard of guys having good luck by sloshing floats followed by pressurizing the compartment with the blower end of a shop vac.

    You might try these guys for sloshing stuff. Look at the 5500 family. If you do slosh I'd appreciate some feedback.

    http://www.neelyindustries.com/chemseal.htm

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    Member AK-HUNT's Avatar
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    Default thats exactly what you do...

    Don't slosh the entire float! I've never seen anyone doing that but I'd like to. First off you're are wasting sloshing sealant and second your floats are gonna weigh about 40 more pounds. Use a vacuum in a pumpout, pressurize the float then spray soapy water on the leaks. Mark them. Go from chamber to chamber and then come back after its dry and put the vacuum on suck and with an acid brush lay some compound on the leaky areas and let the vacuum suck it into the crack so its sealed in the crack. You'll have to do this several times to get them sealed but it seals them up tight if you take your time. Makes tight floats.

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    AK-HUNT,

    I'm fairly certain my leaks are in the seams around the step. I figured to clean them up and paint some sealer on, then pressurize the compartment. A guy could go crazy trying to pinpoint a seep along a seam. Is my idea faulty?

  7. #7

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    yah, that's what we usually do, get some soap and use a vacuum, another good product to seal those holes is Gluv-it, you can find it at any marina store

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    Member AK-HUNT's Avatar
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    Default Pid

    I had leaks down the seams on the sides, in nooks and crannies up in the step, and every other place. You'll be surprised how much soap bubbles you'll have. (This stuff will suck in all of them with the vacuum going.) Water may not necessarily seep in all the places air does but if you do it once this way you will have nice tight floats. You have to (well, its best) take the actual float off the rigging so you can lay it on the side and get to the bottoms real good. Anyway, I'm sure its not the ONLY way, but my .02 its the best way you will have no leaks and not have to do it twice. Definitely a winter project. Not all that much fun.

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    Member AK-HUNT's Avatar
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    Wink Oh yeah....

    If it a real big gap consider pro seal or the like first but don't get happy with it. It's weight. Again, one man's opinion only. There's a disclaimer that goes something like: Any advice posted here is merely gossip and not to be minunderstood as "approved data".

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    I've tried shoe-horning floats into a garage before. No go. Disassembly is a pain but will be required for my garage space.

    Thanks for the tips, guys.

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    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    Lake and air sells cans of float seam sealer...
    http://www.lakeandair.com/

    I have also made my own by mixing Marine Caulk with a thinning agent like Toluene. I use a small acid brush to feed it into the leaks while the shop vac sucks away on the other side....


    I have one compartment with a mystery leak this summer.... NOBODY can figure out where it is leaking....

    Our new theory is that there is a portal to another dimension inside the float and a lake is slowly being drained on another planet....
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    Default

    Just to clarify, you apply the goo to the inside and suck it toward the outside, right? How can you get suction on a seam?

    Thanks for the product link.

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    Default not quite...

    Exactly opposite, actually. Think of it this way. You can duct tape the vacuum hose in a pumpout cup and it never moves thill the job's over. You have to apply the sealer to the outside while the vacuum has negative pressure applied to the hull. And remember, you will likely have to do the same spot 3, 4, or 5 times cause the stuff is thin enough to get in all the little cracks, it mostly sucks right through so it takes multiples with any good gaps. If you use marine sealant or proseal for big leaks you would apply that to the inside.

    You could do individual rivets or something the other way you had mentioned, but that's making life hard and I am very simple. You couldn't ever get good suction on a seam, I wouldn't think.

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    Member AK Tubes's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AK-HUNT View Post
    Exactly opposite, actually. Think of it this way. You can duct tape the vacuum hose in a pumpout cup and it never moves thill the job's over. You have to apply the sealer to the outside while the vacuum has negative pressure applied to the hull. And remember, you will likely have to do the same spot 3, 4, or 5 times cause the stuff is thin enough to get in all the little cracks, it mostly sucks right through so it takes multiples with any good gaps. If you use marine sealant or proseal for big leaks you would apply that to the inside.

    You could do individual rivets or something the other way you had mentioned, but that's making life hard and I am very simple. You couldn't ever get good suction on a seam, I wouldn't think.

    Can you paint over anything that spreads out on to the sheet metal?

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    Default don't know

    never tried but I'm guessing you'd probably sand off the extra and then paint. You won't really have that much extra on the float if you are careful.

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    Default

    I have used the vacum method and the pressure method. My shop vac is reversable.

    Usually I find a small leak (outside) and suck it into the gap by applying vacum to the float pump out for that compartment....

    BUT,,, I couple times we had some leaks that had to be sealed from inside,,,, SO... we gooped on a bunch, then re-slosed the hatch, followed by applying pressure (reserve vac) through the pump out.... The sealant was forced out through the leaks....

    Let it dry overnight and try it again the next day...
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
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