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Thread: salmon sharks good to eat ?

  1. #1
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    Default salmon sharks good to eat ?

    Can anyone tell me if salmon sharks are good to eat ? as good as halibut ? how do you cook them anyway, Thanks

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    Member homerdave's Avatar
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    Exclamation VERY high in methyl mercury

    but much like swordfish if bled and iced promptly.
    to be avoided by children and women who are or may become pregnant.
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  3. #3

    Default Salmon sharks

    Yes, they are good to eat. It's best to bleed them immediately, and gut them before bringing them on the boat. Cook them on the barbeque. Marinate them in Pineapple, lemon or orange juice, onions, red peppers, parley,and season to taste. A differnt texture than halibut, very meaty and mild flavored fish.

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    Default Negatory

    I've tried them alot of ways....and all i can say is they have a unique flavor, which seems to set off a gag reflex in my system.

    And

    They have a rather pungent after taste....and before you guys flame me

    yes the shark was properly bleed, and soaking it in milk or anything else doesnt and didn't help.

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    Member akrstabout's Avatar
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    Default I had about 10#'s of it from a co-worker

    To all of us it tasted similar to pork. I too grilled with a seasoning salt. Very good, it was gone in less than a month. There guide gutted and bled and then told them soak it in saltwater, not ocean saltwater but I think just regular salt. Not sure on mixture but it was tasty stuff. If you go with a guide, listen to what he tells you.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Default

    I had some years ago, and remember it being great on the grill - not unlike steak in texture, similar to tuna.

    Do not take Homerdave's warning about the mercury lightly. Mercury is fat soluble, therefore it does not simply wash out of one's system. Women who may become pregnant, even a few years down the line, should avoid fish high in mercury including salmon sharks and to a lesser degree ling cod and large (100lb+) halibut. It can cause mental retardation in the developing fetus even though the mother will never show any ill effects.

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    Default Every person is different

    I didnt think it tasted like pork, I've eaten it Grilled, BBCue, Baked, Poached, and Canned, and in all instances - I have decided that it won't go down the gullet unless its the last thing on earth to eat - and even then I'll probably starve to death.

    I'm glad others like the flavor - I have friends that say its great, for me, its just downright horrid.

    For me its nowhere near Pork, or Tuna and for once someone didn't say

    "It taste like Chicken"

    Eat and enjoy - for myself I'll CnR them - someday I'll actually fight one of these beasts of the deep for myself. Perhaps even this weekend.

  8. #8
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    I was recently told that in addition to bleeding them immediately it's key to skin them immediately because they urinate "through their skin".

    I don't know how true this is.

    I have experience eating mako sharks when I was younger in Southern California. Some were delicious, and then I got one that wasn't. I haven't eaten much shark since.

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    Default if they urinate thru the skin

    Then its gotta be goin thru those muscular tissues.....somewhere

    at any rate,

    yup....that about sums it up as to why the gag relfex then

    phew!

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    Default Not actual urine

    Quote Originally Posted by Cutter View Post
    Then its gotta be goin thru those muscular tissues.....somewhere

    at any rate,

    yup....that about sums it up as to why the gag relfex then

    phew!

    Sharks and other elasmobranchs don't actually urinate through their skin. They use Urea in their blood to keep the "salinity" of their blood equal to that of the surrounding saltwater. Most other types of fish maintain to same blood "salitinity" as humans or even freshwater fish which is about a third of the salt concentration as saltwater. That's the reason why you want to get as much blood as you can out quickly in order to remove the urea from their system. anyway sorry for the lecture

  11. #11

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    What's the story with the mercury? Why do they have it? They mostly just eat salmon.. the things don't suck on auto tail pipes or anything

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    Member AKMarmot's Avatar
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    Default agree with cutter

    I with you cutter, my other half really likes it however I can't stand it. Since I do most of the grilling it has stayed in the freezer for a year now. Just can't do it & my neighbors weren't big fans of it either.
    So if anyone would like a sample I will see how much is still there.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by G P View Post
    What's the story with the mercury? Why do they have it? They mostly just eat salmon.. the things don't suck on auto tail pipes or anything
    It's a result of what is known as biomagnification. A lot of mercury is put into our atmosphere every year because of various forms of industrial pollution (coal-fired power plants are among the largest contributers, especially in 3rd world countries). This mercury finds its way into our water, and is eventually taken up by various organisms. When something larger eats, it accumulates whatever mercury is in its food. The mercury is not washed out of the organism's system, as it is lipophilic ("fat-loving"). On and on it is passed through the food web, becoming concentrated in higher and higher amounts in the apex predators. Among fish, it is the top-water predators that have the highest levels of mercury, levels high enough to be of concern to developing fetuses and young children. Such fish include sharks, tilefish, tuna, swordfish, king mackeral, and other large predatory fish. Beyond fish, the most polluted animals in the world include orcas and polar bears. Alaska is a looooong way from the source of the mercury pollution, but thanks to global air and water currents we are a dumping ground for much of the world's mercury.

    For more info check out this link.

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    some of the mercury up here is naturally occuring, the result of ash fallout from volcanoes, but the method in which it accumulates in apex predators is still the same.
    Alaska Board of Game 2015 tour... "Kicking the can down the road"
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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by homerdave View Post
    some of the mercury up here is naturally occuring, the result of ash fallout from volcanoes, but the method in which it accumulates in apex predators is still the same.
    Oops! Thanks for the correction on that one, Dave.

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    Default Even more mercury concern

    Levels of mercury are on the rise in Alaska again. In the past a study was conducted and it was found that large halibut in Alaska were safe to eat while in more southern regions halibut above 60 lbs were considered unsafe. Last year however the issue was revisited and they found that halibut of 80-100lbs contained high enough levels of mercury to be considered a hazard. It's unfortunate that we have to worry about the natural, wild, fish that we eat. Sharks are especially bad because they have a long life span to accumulate mercury. I don't know about Salmon sharks but I do know that a dog shark that is 1 meter long is about 100 years old. That's a lot of time to have this stuff build up.

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    Default Naturally Occurring Mercury

    This is an interesting discussion. I was one of the authors of the 1999 methyl mercury in subsistence fish (Bethel). I would note that only about 1% of mercury comes from industrial or man made sources. Also, some comes from volcano but the primary source in Alaska is cinnabar... a natural mercury-containing mineral found all over Alaska. Actually, there is a very rich cinnabar mine just north of Homer.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Wow - that's interesting info, Rod. Can you send me some sources on that info? (Not questioning the validity - I'm a science teacher and would like to have that info on hand.) Thanks!

    -Brian

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    Member homerdave's Avatar
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    Question where is the mine?

    just curious...i know if a couple mine sites in the outer coast, but they are south of here.
    Alaska Board of Game 2015 tour... "Kicking the can down the road"
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