Results 1 to 16 of 16

Thread: Lynx Lake

  1. #1
    Member patrickL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    1,160

    Default Lynx Lake

    My wife booked a cabin at Lynx Lake in the Nancy Lakes area next weekend. We recently bought a snow machine and auger to try and get them outside and have some adventures. Anyone have advice on fishing Lynx? Iíve heard herring and white jigs can work. Iím just looking for something to keep our kids engaged and having fun. Thoughts and advice are welcome.

  2. #2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by patrickL View Post
    My wife booked a cabin at Lynx Lake in the Nancy Lakes area next weekend. We recently bought a snow machine and auger to try and get them outside and have some adventures. Anyone have advice on fishing Lynx? Iíve heard herring and white jigs can work. Iím just looking for something to keep our kids engaged and having fun. Thoughts and advice are welcome.
    You're on the right track with tackle. If you can, explore the Echo ponds and fish near the entrances and exits of those ponds.


    Heavy Hitter Fishing
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Heavy...54441957966186

    Kodiak Custom Fishing Tackle Pro-Staff


  3. #3

    Default

    Although I have ice fished for pike, I first must confess that I haven't done a lot of ice fishing for pike. I've mostly fished for them in the summer/spring. And I'm familiar with and have fished for pike in Lynx lake. That being said, if you are somewhat familiar with Lynx lake and pike fishing you will already know that they primarily hang out in the shallow, weedy patches in the spring and summer. However, it has been my experience, that pike tend to hang out in areas a little bit deeper in the winter time. Although I believe they will be close to their summer locations. But if it were me, I would focus in water 10-20 feet deep in the winter for pike. But I would also check out the shallow areas as well. And try to find where the bait fish are hanging out. Because if you can find the bait fish, I would be willing to bet you will find the pike.

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    32

    Default

    Apologies for the long read! My family stayed at Lynx Lake cabins #2 & #3 for 2 nights in early March last year. These are new cabins and they are absolutely amazing! We love to ice fish (especially for Pike) but my advice for the lakes out in that area (Red Shirt, Nancy, Lynx, etc.) is to keep your expectations low and move around if you aren't catching anything. It's not the best place to get the kids addicted to ice fishing because they will need lots of patience. We normally fish for pike with tip-ups. On this trip, I started drilling holes on Lynx Lake right out in front of the cabins. I had planned on setting up all 16 of my tip ups but hit bottom with the auger on the 6th hole and dulled it badly. No sharpener and no spare blades meant we were done punching holes. We had tip-ups in those 6 holes for 2 1/2 days without a single bite. The kids tried jigging off and on at various times during the day but not even a strike. We had low expectations from the start because it was early March and ice fishing is normally slow that time of year. Without the ability to move around the lake we quickly gave up on our hopes for a fresh pike dinner. The kids discovered other ways to have fun. Lynx Lake Rd. passes just to the east of the cabins. The road slopes down for a long distance just before the cabins. It makes for a superb sled hill. We hauled the kids up to the top on the snowmachines and let them slide down on toboggans. This kept them grinning for hours. Make sure to bring a toboggan or similar type of snow sled. A helmet is a must because they can really get clipping along. We also brought cross country skis and snow shoes for the kids. They also had board/card games to play in the cabins. At no point did i hear anyone complaining about being bored. Bring a chain saw if you have one. There are tons of beetle kill spruce all around. A bon fire at night is another great way to keep the kids entertained. As a precaution, I'll tell you about a frightening experience I had on our second day. It was just after daylight and i got up before everyone else to take the dogs out for a walk. There is a small lake just to the east of Cabins 2 & 3. I don't think that lake has a name. It may just be a large pond. It was covered with snowmachine tracks which made for easy walking. I started to notice spots where people had been ice fishing just days before, so I walked around to each spot to see if there were signs of catching fish (blood, guts, etc.). There was a hole that someone had drilled near the north end of the lake about 200 yards east of Cabin 2. As i was standing there I noticed another curious spot about 20 feet to the north and began to walk towards it. As i did, the ice gave out beneath me and I went down. I grabbed the surrounding ice as I went down and prevented my head from going under. I was surprised at how deep the water was because I was fairly close to the shore. I tried twice to pull myself up on the ice but it kept breaking under my weight. I noticed my brother-in-law outside of Cabin 3 trying to start a snowmachine. I tried to yell for help but could barely make a sound as I was still gasping for breath due to cold shock. I knew I was going to have to get out on my own and that I didn't have a lot of time. I remembered a YouTube video that I had watched years before about how to self-rescue if you fall through the ice. I didn't remember everything from that video but 3 points came to my mind and I firmly believe that those simple points saved my life. The first point was to not panic and wait for the cold shock to pass before trying to get out. Cold shock makes you gasp for air uncontrollably. If you exert yourself during this stage, you have less oxygen to your muscles and you become weaker faster. After you fall in, find some ice that is stable enough to rest your arms on while you wait for the cold shock to pass (around 20 to 30 seconds). The second point I remembered was that once your breathing starts to normalize, make your way back to the spot where you first fell through the ice. You want to go out the way you came in because the ice was thick enough to support you up to that point. The third point was how to pull yourself out. Spread your arms out on the ice in front of you and while pulling yourself up with your arms, kick your legs as hard as you can to try to bring your body as horizontal as possible. Keep pulling with your arms and kicking until your torso is up on the ice. At that point you should be able to get one leg up on the ice and then start rolling away from the hole. Keep rolling until you are at least ten feet from the hole. This is what I did and it worked like a charm. I would have never guessed it possible to fall through the ice that day. The holes I drilled on Lynx Lake the day before had at least 24 inches of ice. Perhaps there was a warm spring under that spot or maybe it had something to do with the earth quake and aftershocks. My lesson that day was to never go out on the ice alone. There are some really good YouTube videos on how to self-rescue from the ice (and some not so good ones). Find a good one and show it to your family and friends.

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DGW View Post
    Apologies for the long read! My family stayed at Lynx Lake cabins #2 & #3 for 2 nights in early March last year. These are new cabins and they are absolutely amazing! We love to ice fish (especially for Pike) but my advice for the lakes out in that area (Red Shirt, Nancy, Lynx, etc.) is to keep your expectations low and move around if you aren't catching anything. It's not the best place to get the kids addicted to ice fishing because they will need lots of patience. We normally fish for pike with tip-ups. On this trip, I started drilling holes on Lynx Lake right out in front of the cabins. I had planned on setting up all 16 of my tip ups but hit bottom with the auger on the 6th hole and dulled it badly. No sharpener and no spare blades meant we were done punching holes. We had tip-ups in those 6 holes for 2 1/2 days without a single bite. The kids tried jigging off and on at various times during the day but not even a strike. We had low expectations from the start because it was early March and ice fishing is normally slow that time of year. Without the ability to move around the lake we quickly gave up on our hopes for a fresh pike dinner. The kids discovered other ways to have fun. Lynx Lake Rd. passes just to the east of the cabins. The road slopes down for a long distance just before the cabins. It makes for a superb sled hill. We hauled the kids up to the top on the snowmachines and let them slide down on toboggans. This kept them grinning for hours. Make sure to bring a toboggan or similar type of snow sled. A helmet is a must because they can really get clipping along. We also brought cross country skis and snow shoes for the kids. They also had board/card games to play in the cabins. At no point did i hear anyone complaining about being bored. Bring a chain saw if you have one. There are tons of beetle kill spruce all around. A bon fire at night is another great way to keep the kids entertained. As a precaution, I'll tell you about a frightening experience I had on our second day. It was just after daylight and i got up before everyone else to take the dogs out for a walk. There is a small lake just to the east of Cabins 2 & 3. I don't think that lake has a name. It may just be a large pond. It was covered with snowmachine tracks which made for easy walking. I started to notice spots where people had been ice fishing just days before, so I walked around to each spot to see if there were signs of catching fish (blood, guts, etc.). There was a hole that someone had drilled near the north end of the lake about 200 yards east of Cabin 2. As i was standing there I noticed another curious spot about 20 feet to the north and began to walk towards it. As i did, the ice gave out beneath me and I went down. I grabbed the surrounding ice as I went down and prevented my head from going under. I was surprised at how deep the water was because I was fairly close to the shore. I tried twice to pull myself up on the ice but it kept breaking under my weight. I noticed my brother-in-law outside of Cabin 3 trying to start a snowmachine. I tried to yell for help but could barely make a sound as I was still gasping for breath due to cold shock. I knew I was going to have to get out on my own and that I didn't have a lot of time. I remembered a YouTube video that I had watched years before about how to self-rescue if you fall through the ice. I didn't remember everything from that video but 3 points came to my mind and I firmly believe that those simple points saved my life. The first point was to not panic and wait for the cold shock to pass before trying to get out. Cold shock makes you gasp for air uncontrollably. If you exert yourself during this stage, you have less oxygen to your muscles and you become weaker faster. After you fall in, find some ice that is stable enough to rest your arms on while you wait for the cold shock to pass (around 20 to 30 seconds). The second point I remembered was that once your breathing starts to normalize, make your way back to the spot where you first fell through the ice. You want to go out the way you came in because the ice was thick enough to support you up to that point. The third point was how to pull yourself out. Spread your arms out on the ice in front of you and while pulling yourself up with your arms, kick your legs as hard as you can to try to bring your body as horizontal as possible. Keep pulling with your arms and kicking until your torso is up on the ice. At that point you should be able to get one leg up on the ice and then start rolling away from the hole. Keep rolling until you are at least ten feet from the hole. This is what I did and it worked like a charm. I would have never guessed it possible to fall through the ice that day. The holes I drilled on Lynx Lake the day before had at least 24 inches of ice. Perhaps there was a warm spring under that spot or maybe it had something to do with the earth quake and aftershocks. My lesson that day was to never go out on the ice alone. There are some really good YouTube videos on how to self-rescue from the ice (and some not so good ones). Find a good one and show it to your family and friends.
    Wow, scary! Interesting story and great tips! Rep points coming your way. Glad you made it out alive. I've fallen through a couple times before but nothing that bad or severe.

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DGW View Post
    Apologies for the long read! My family stayed at Lynx Lake cabins #2 & #3 for 2 nights in early March last year. These are new cabins and they are absolutely amazing! We love to ice fish (especially for Pike) but my advice for the lakes out in that area (Red Shirt, Nancy, Lynx, etc.) is to keep your expectations low and move around if you aren't catching anything. It's not the best place to get the kids addicted to ice fishing because they will need lots of patience. We normally fish for pike with tip-ups. On this trip, I started drilling holes on Lynx Lake right out in front of the cabins. I had planned on setting up all 16 of my tip ups but hit bottom with the auger on the 6th hole and dulled it badly. No sharpener and no spare blades meant we were done punching holes. We had tip-ups in those 6 holes for 2 1/2 days without a single bite. The kids tried jigging off and on at various times during the day but not even a strike. We had low expectations from the start because it was early March and ice fishing is normally slow that time of year. Without the ability to move around the lake we quickly gave up on our hopes for a fresh pike dinner. The kids discovered other ways to have fun. Lynx Lake Rd. passes just to the east of the cabins. The road slopes down for a long distance just before the cabins. It makes for a superb sled hill. We hauled the kids up to the top on the snowmachines and let them slide down on toboggans. This kept them grinning for hours. Make sure to bring a toboggan or similar type of snow sled. A helmet is a must because they can really get clipping along. We also brought cross country skis and snow shoes for the kids. They also had board/card games to play in the cabins. At no point did i hear anyone complaining about being bored. Bring a chain saw if you have one. There are tons of beetle kill spruce all around. A bon fire at night is another great way to keep the kids entertained. As a precaution, I'll tell you about a frightening experience I had on our second day. It was just after daylight and i got up before everyone else to take the dogs out for a walk. There is a small lake just to the east of Cabins 2 & 3. I don't think that lake has a name. It may just be a large pond. It was covered with snowmachine tracks which made for easy walking. I started to notice spots where people had been ice fishing just days before, so I walked around to each spot to see if there were signs of catching fish (blood, guts, etc.). There was a hole that someone had drilled near the north end of the lake about 200 yards east of Cabin 2. As i was standing there I noticed another curious spot about 20 feet to the north and began to walk towards it. As i did, the ice gave out beneath me and I went down. I grabbed the surrounding ice as I went down and prevented my head from going under. I was surprised at how deep the water was because I was fairly close to the shore. I tried twice to pull myself up on the ice but it kept breaking under my weight. I noticed my brother-in-law outside of Cabin 3 trying to start a snowmachine. I tried to yell for help but could barely make a sound as I was still gasping for breath due to cold shock. I knew I was going to have to get out on my own and that I didn't have a lot of time. I remembered a YouTube video that I had watched years before about how to self-rescue if you fall through the ice. I didn't remember everything from that video but 3 points came to my mind and I firmly believe that those simple points saved my life. The first point was to not panic and wait for the cold shock to pass before trying to get out. Cold shock makes you gasp for air uncontrollably. If you exert yourself during this stage, you have less oxygen to your muscles and you become weaker faster. After you fall in, find some ice that is stable enough to rest your arms on while you wait for the cold shock to pass (around 20 to 30 seconds). The second point I remembered was that once your breathing starts to normalize, make your way back to the spot where you first fell through the ice. You want to go out the way you came in because the ice was thick enough to support you up to that point. The third point was how to pull yourself out. Spread your arms out on the ice in front of you and while pulling yourself up with your arms, kick your legs as hard as you can to try to bring your body as horizontal as possible. Keep pulling with your arms and kicking until your torso is up on the ice. At that point you should be able to get one leg up on the ice and then start rolling away from the hole. Keep rolling until you are at least ten feet from the hole. This is what I did and it worked like a charm. I would have never guessed it possible to fall through the ice that day. The holes I drilled on Lynx Lake the day before had at least 24 inches of ice. Perhaps there was a warm spring under that spot or maybe it had something to do with the earth quake and aftershocks. My lesson that day was to never go out on the ice alone. There are some really good YouTube videos on how to self-rescue from the ice (and some not so good ones). Find a good one and show it to your family and friends.
    Having been in through the ice I feel your pain! There is moving water above that little bridge for quite a ways and that pond is fairly deep up there. Glad you're okay!


    Heavy Hitter Fishing
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Heavy...54441957966186

    Kodiak Custom Fishing Tackle Pro-Staff


  7. #7

    Default

    We have caught more pike in the little pond DGW is referring too than we have in Lynx lake itself. They are all pretty small though, id say 24 inches would be dang big in there.
    The Second Amendment.......Know it, love it, support it.

  8. #8
    Member Daveinthebush's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Valdez, Alaska
    Posts
    5,648

    Default

    Fillet those little ones until you have a good sized bag, skin off. Leave the little Y bones in and run it thru a meat grinder two times. On the third time in the grinder mix in Italian flavored bread crumbs. Then when mixed, make it into hamburger sized patties. Delicious.

    Patriot Life Member NRA
    Life Member Veterans of Foreign Wars
    Life Member Disabled American Veterans



  9. #9
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
    Posts
    11,656

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DGW View Post
    I remembered a YouTube video that I had watched years before about how to self-rescue if you fall through the ice.
    Hard to say if I saw the same video that you did, but it was pretty much like you said. The one I saw actually had a guy demonstrate breaking through on an iced over lake. I really believe a huge part of getting yourself out is managing the immediate cold shock. At the time you go in you don't think it will pass, but it will if you control your breathing. After that, trying to get yourself horizontal is key. Glad you were able to keep your wits about you to remember what you had seen, and are still with us today!
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  10. #10

    Default

    Here is a quick youtube video about how to get out without safety equipment.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tHf7nt6pcyI

  11. #11
    Member patrickL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    1,160

    Default

    Thanks everyone for your input. If there are other advice or suggestions that would be great. One quick question, how do I know how deep the water is under the ice, before I drill a hole, in hopes of avoiding hitting bottom? Is there something you can tell by looking at the ice?

  12. #12
    Member Daveinthebush's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Valdez, Alaska
    Posts
    5,648

    Default

    Some fish finders, if you do a shallow hole and pour water in it, will give you a depth.

    Patriot Life Member NRA
    Life Member Veterans of Foreign Wars
    Life Member Disabled American Veterans



  13. #13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by patrickL View Post
    Thanks everyone for your input. If there are other advice or suggestions that would be great. One quick question, how do I know how deep the water is under the ice, before I drill a hole, in hopes of avoiding hitting bottom? Is there something you can tell by looking at the ice?
    Like Dave in the bush said, the only way to know for sure is to get a flasher and pour water on the ice first, but you can also sometimes find lake maps on the fish and game website that give you a rough idea where the deep water is but sometimes I have found them to not be accurate. To be safe, start out deep and work you way in to a depth you find suitable. That's the safest bet.

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    32

    Default

    Thanks guys! I'm really glad to still be here too. I dug around YouTube and found the video that saved me. The guy is a Canadian scientist that researches hypothermia.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wz3gy5XyaBo&t=10s

    It's interesting that hypothermia is not the main threat. Our muscles become weaker and weaker as our time in the water progresses. If you aren't out within 5 to 10 minutes, you'll be too weak to get out by yourself - but still won't be hypothermic.

    The water in front of Cabins 2 and 3 gets deep quickly. Deeper than what I normally fish for Pike in. I kept drilling closer and closer to shore to try to find about 3 to 4 feet of water under the ice and was about 6 feet from shore when I hit the bottom.

  15. #15
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
    Posts
    11,656

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DGW View Post
    Thanks guys! I'm really glad to still be here too. I dug around YouTube and found the video that saved me. The guy is a Canadian scientist that researches hypothermia.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wz3gy5XyaBo&t=10s

    It's interesting that hypothermia is not the main threat. Our muscles become weaker and weaker as our time in the water progresses. If you aren't out within 5 to 10 minutes, you'll be too weak to get out by yourself - but still won't be hypothermic.

    The water in front of Cabins 2 and 3 gets deep quickly. Deeper than what I normally fish for Pike in. I kept drilling closer and closer to shore to try to find about 3 to 4 feet of water under the ice and was about 6 feet from shore when I hit the bottom.
    Not the video I saw but excellent none the same! I can appreciate the idea of your arms, or even your beard freezing to the ice if you can't get out as a way you could still survive is quite understandable at the temps we've been having lately.
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  16. #16
    Member patrickL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    1,160

    Default

    Just wanted to drop a quick thanks to everyone. We went out last weekend and spent 2 nights at Lynx Lake. It was -28F on Sunday morning so we didn't get in much ice fishing in with our boys as they are just 7 and 9 and got cold quick. We fished just off the peninsula out in front of cabin 2 and got a few bites but didn't catch anything. It was a great trip though and we all had a fun time. My son spent his 10th birthday there on Monday and said it was the most fun birthday he has had given he got to drive our new, to us, snow machine and ski back from the cabin. Hard to beat that.

    Anyway, just wanted to say thanks and we will be getting out a few more times this winter on overnight trips and to fish. Hope to see you out there.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •