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Thread: Transporters Ruin Ivashak and Echooka

  1. #1
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    Default Transporters Ruin Ivashak and Echooka

    Transports have flooded this area with hunters with the promise of Caribou. There is a camp every mile, we saw plenty of hunters in this area and No caribou. There should be a limit on how many out side hunters the Texan company can take to the cleaners.
    They will earn the hard way the game will avoid the area. We have hunted this for yrs and enjoyed the solitude. Guess those days are gone. WE saw No game the week we were there. Feel free to add your option.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gtransue View Post
    Transports have flooded this area with hunters with the promise of Caribou. There is a camp every mile, we saw plenty of hunters in this area and No caribou. There should be a limit on how many out side hunters the Texan company can take to the cleaners.
    They will earn the hard way the game will avoid the area. We have hunted this for yrs and enjoyed the solitude. Guess those days are gone. WE saw No game the week we were there. Feel free to add your option.
    Is this public land? And we’re they legally hunting? I’d love to see a camp site every one mile instead of
    every 100 yards (trying to let you know that as bad as it may seem, it could always be worse).

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    Member bkmail's Avatar
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    These rivers cannot handle that heavy traffic. Its very unfortunate as it was a fun and productive place.
    Hopefully something changes for the better.
    Bk


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    Quote Originally Posted by Yukon Cornelius View Post
    (trying to let you know that as bad as it may seem, it could always be worse).
    It "WILL" get worse.

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    Member breth's Avatar
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    I got home on Wednesday from echooka, yes we saw lots of hunters and boats but also a good # of animals. We did have to leave the river and get on the bluffs but we were able to fill all our tags in 6 days. Apply some effort and you increase your odds. We met several great folks on the tundra and had zero issues with folks infringing on stalks. Public land hunting, it is what it is.

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    I didn’t see another group for 5 days on the Ivishak in August 2010. I guess that has changed. 😢

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    Quote Originally Posted by gtransue View Post
    Transports have flooded this area with hunters with the promise of Caribou. There is a camp every mile, we saw plenty of hunters in this area and No caribou. There should be a limit on how many out side hunters the Texan company can take to the cleaners.
    They will earn the hard way the game will avoid the area. We have hunted this for yrs and enjoyed the solitude. Guess those days are gone. WE saw No game the week we were there. Feel free to add your option.
    Totally agree. The same thing happened to us last year (a full week and saw nothing except Moronus Erectus, tents, and incessant running up and down the river dropping more people)--we've hunted up there for 25 years (until last year, always had adequate opportunity), and these money-grubbing rascals have just ruined the place.

    I'm not sure of the solution, but maybe a restriction on transporters and/or a required 1-1 guide to client ratio would clean things up a bit.

    I'm not buying the "public land" argument--"public" is for the common good/access, not for the benefit of a select few who commercialize and overwhelm the area for their own profit.

  8. #8
    Member bkmail's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Birdstrike View Post
    I didn’t see another group for 5 days on the Ivishak in August 2010. I guess that has changed.
    Same. If we ran into another camp or two on the river it was normal. Some years it was none.
    This year there are at least three transporter outfits and the one company alone booked 60 hunters with a goal to increase it to 100 next year.
    Now were getting reports on the other thread on this forum, a guide and plane might be working together to intercept them. Stepping on others toes to beat them to the bou.....no thanks. That doesn’t sound like a relaxing family hunt anymore.
    Bk


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  9. #9

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    We were up this in Aug of 2014. We didn't see 1 single person. Guess we won't be going back their. What a shame.

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    Quote Originally Posted by slickmcit View Post
    We were up this in Aug of 2014. We didn't see 1 single person. Guess we won't be going back their. What a shame.
    I would say just go back and give it a shot, you have got to push out!

  11. #11

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    I stopped going to the Ivishak and Echooka quite a while ago when it went from just the occasional float hunters going by to airboat transporters loading the place up. I saw this coming once I heard about the number of transporters in the area. I went 7 years in a row before deciding it was getting a little too busy and I was getting tired of beating up my boat and trailer. I really miss it though, that area is spectacular.

  12. #12

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    Alaska sure was sweet hunting fifty years ago. You could go into back country, and stay for six weeks and not see one other person. A lot of those locations later became National Parks. It is a giggle when someone asks where was that harvested......"Oh, that was in the "?????" National Park".

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    Member Frostbitten's Avatar
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    I find it ironic how the hunting community in general promotes trying to get more people (especially youngsters) into hunting because our numbers are dropping, then we turn right around and fuss about there being too many hunters out there.

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    Agree with Frostbitten.

    Hunter numbers are down. I live in the interior (not Fairbanks) and have talked to a couple of old timers who have been here for 50+ years in the same area. They are still out and doing their thing and both have told me there are a fraction of the people in the backcountry today compared to the 70s and 80s when everyone and their brother flocked to Alaska to homestead and live the pioneer life. Sure there are lots of people on easily trafficked travel corridors (hwy's, atv trails that might as well be hwy's, rivers easy to run etc) essentially all road hunters IMO. Which is fine if that is your thing, but stop complaining. I just spent moose season a measly 3 miles off the road, walked in, and never saw nor heard another human being for 8 days. Moose and bear aplenty though. However, I would like to see tighter regulation on transporters that seem to be multiplying like cockroaches, maybe assign transporters to an area similar to guides.

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by alaska80 View Post
    However, I would like to see tighter regulation on transporters that seem to be multiplying like cockroaches, maybe assign transporters to an area similar to guides.
    If you want to make all the Transporters disappear, You just give them free instant "Registered Guide" License. It was done in the Past.

  16. #16

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    Not all the problems come from Transporters. Air Taxi's and others do drop off hunts as well. Transporters are Transporters just because they buy a Transporter license and have different rules to abide by.

  17. #17
    Supporting Member zman313's Avatar
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    Absolutely. Was there 9 years ago and the bou where everywhere. Probably saw 4-500 in 3 days. Went 2 yrs ago and saw 50 in 7 days. As soon as they heard an air boat coming they would take off like they where in the Kentucky derby, right out of sight. Sad.

  18. #18
    Member blasterak's Avatar
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    River is pretty crowded due to drop camps in some areas, we were up there last month. We went past most the drop camps in my boat and into caribou though, seemed like the transporters kept their clients in one area(area with no bou at that time too lol). Only had one other boat go by our camp the entire week. We were successful, was an awesome hunt and adventure and would do it again but do agree the transporters are a bit thick out there.

  19. #19
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    Nonresident hunting of the Central Arctic Herd should have been heavily curtailed in 2016 after the severe decline of the herd. The Board of Game did not listen and instead they allocted a projected 43% of the harvest to nonresident hunters after restricting residents severely. This is an Intensive Mgmt population that is important to feed Alaskans. After the BOG's actions, the next year nonresidents took 55% of the CAH harvest.

    It's mostly nonresidents using the airboat transporters. This was the argument made in 2016, by God we can't limit nonresidents too much otherwise the guides and air-taxis and transporters would not have enough business. And while I may feel for those commercial enterprises, it isn't the BOG's job to ensure any commercial ventures are viable. Again, this is an Intensive Mgmt population and the BOG did not do what our IM law stated when they have to restrict resident hunters...remove or restrict the nonresident component first.

    RHAK has a proposal in on this issue for the Region III BOG meeting next March. We also have legislation pending to ensure the decision the BOG made in this instance never happens again. Hope we get your support!

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