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Thread: Help!

  1. #1
    Member fullkurl's Avatar
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    Default Help!

    I have a muzzleloader barrel that has been fired and not cleaned for some time. The kid (21) used it at the range (over a year ago!) and never told me that it had been fired and put it way without cleaning.
    He's lost his inheritance now...


    The spent 209 primer is firmly in place and won't budge and I fear the inside of the barrel looks like the little shop of horrors.
    It's a very rare Hastings paradox muzzleloader barrel that mounts on my 870 Remington. They stopped making them years ago.
    Any ideas how to get this thing professionally refurbished? I called Hastings days ago and apparently they are blowing me off.
    Anybody experience anything like this? Can it be saved? It's pretty fouled.

    Thanks smokepolers....


    Frank

  2. #2

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    Ugh!

    I'm not familiar with that barrel, but I'm guessing you'll have the best luck getting that primer out by first removing the breech plug, then using a punch to push it out. If your installation of the breech plug included a good grease, hopefully it won't be too much problem to remove.

    You don't mention what kind of powder was used, but that can affect the severity of the fowling and/or rust. Bad news if it was Pyrodex, because you're probably dealing with serious rust in addition to fowling. I'm not as familiar with propellants like 777 or American Pioneer, but it's my understanding that they are better. AP at least claims that you don't really have to clean them. True Black Powder is potentially less corrosive than Pyrodex, but not much.

    I'd go about cleaning it as best you can by soaking it in soapy water for ten minutes or so, then attacking it with a bore brush followed by patches. The goal would be to get rid of the fowling to see how bad the rust situation is beneath it.

    If the rust isn't too bad (i.e., the rifling is still visible) there's some potential to clean up the bore by fire lapping using this technique.

    If following all that the rifling is still visible but pretty badly eaten away, you may end of fighting both bullet slip and getting a good seal to keep gases from passing the bullet in the bore. That's another discussion to return to after you determine just what you're dealing with after a good cleaning.

  3. #3
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    Wink

    Frank, I haven"t tried this , but if you feel the bore is damaged, and is close to being a total loss, after the primer is removed plug the primer hole with wax, and fill the bore with anti- freeze, pure, let sit for a few hours 8 then check it out.I recall that anti- freeze is used this way to clean up rusty tools. Like i"ve said havent tried it but if your looking at replacing the barrel it might be worth a shot. Bill.
    ; for them that honour me I will honour, and they that despise me shall be lightly esteemed. 1 SAMUEL 2;30

  4. #4
    Member fullkurl's Avatar
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    Default okay...

    thanks for the suggestions, guys. BB, the breachplug nut wants to round out rather than come out--part of the problem. I'll stay with it though. Maybe a gunsmith would have a better shot at it's removal.
    Son was using Pyrodex, so rust is a reality.

    I'm going to try the antifreeze gig. Hate to lose this barrel, they are very hard to find.


    Thanks again guys.


    Frank

  5. #5
    Member Joel Zadvorney's Avatar
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    Default

    If you have a machine shop near by with a ultrasonic parts cleaner, that will work. A large capacity ulrasonic jewelry cleaner might be strong enough. Submerge end of barrel into cleaner and turn it on. It's amazing how they work. Another try would be the carbon cleaner in a spray can. I get it at the marine store and it is for stripping carbon buildup on parts NOT for spraying into a carborator. Strips carbon like crazy. Had a simaler problem to you and used the carbon stripper, worked well. The sonic cleaner will work faster. Have fun...

    Joel

  6. #6
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    Default

    Fullkurl, before you try antifreeze, try warm water and a brass brush and patches to get the fouling out.Then fill her up with some penetrating oil and let it sit for a few days, that might soak down into your breech threads and help you get the plug out. Then you can get a good look at the rifling. I've often use 4ought steel wool and ballistoil to smooth rough barrels, then polish with JB compound. A few pits aren't necessarily the end of the world in a muzzleloader barrel. If like Brown Bear says your accuracy suffers from gas blowby on your slug or sabot, try a wonder wad under your projectile to help with the bore seal. I have a .29 caliber barrel that as near as I can tell was made in the 1840's-50's that looked like a sewer pipe when I got it last year and with the above treatment it has turned out real nice. If you are in the Anchorage area I'd be happy to help you any way I can. Good luck,Kyle

  7. #7

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    This might be worth a try. After cleaning out the Pyrodex fouling with bore cleaner or soap and water, dry it and filler-up with Kroil and stand in a bucket. Perhaps it will also loosen the primer as well as the breech plug. Using a bronze brush, scrub out the barrel really good to loosen all the rust. Then use the Kroil as a base for Rem Clean/ 40X cleaner instead of Rem Oil. You might want to run some patches with JB through it then. I'm speculating that using Bore Butter to re-season the barrel might fill small rust pits and salvage it. It sounds like you have nothing to lose at this point.

    Even though I cleaned and oiled before storing my first smoke pole, I found more rust than I ever wanted to see when I got around to shooting it again. I ran a patch down the bore before shooting it and was horrified at what came out on it. I didn't have the breech plug problem you did because it's a side lock, but I found that after a thorough brushing and cleaning, when I put a patch with Kroil on it to coat the bore it came out red and that's when I figured out the stuff would loosen rust. When I was done I coated the barrel with Bore Butter and went back a few days later and got some more rust to come out from the breech area by the flash hole. I didn't expect the gun to shoot worth a darn after that, but surprisingly it was OK. I swabbed after each shot with a patch soaked in BP cleaner, followed with a dry patch, and then used a patched ball lubricated with Bore Butter. The more I shot it the better it got. I haven't had any more rust, and the Bore Butter seems to work as advertised, putting seasoning on the bore that protects it from rust. It cleans up a lot easier too.


    Good luck and I hope the kid is doing the grunt work on this project. There's nothing like the education one gets from correcting one's mistakes.

  8. #8
    Member fullkurl's Avatar
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    Default great...

    tips, guys. Thanks a million. The barrel is soaking now in a bucket with penetrating oil upside down. I'll give it a few days...

    Flyer, the kids in Fairbanks working construction on Wainwright or I'd make him do the ugly stuff!

    Frank

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