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Thread: Anchor River Silvers Report

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
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    Anchorage
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    84

    Default Anchor River Silvers Report

    Anyone know how the Anchor is fishing for silvers this week. some years they are a no show and reluctant to bite eggs.
    or low water keeps them from coming in.

  2. #2
    Member
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    Apr 2015
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    Alaska
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    Talking

    My wife and I went to the Anchor yesterday to check out the situation. I had looked at the USGS gauging station the night before after seeing how low the water was driving by previously. The Anchor is experiencing some of the lowest flows ever recorded. The avg flow for this date is about 127 cfs. The gauge was marking 53 cfs the day-before-yesterday. Water temperature at the gauging station was 66*-68*.

    I fished the incoming high tide (quite low at 16.2í) in the afternoon with a flyrod and two known coho producers within a stones throw of the mouth of the river. i fished an hour and a half across the high tide and saw no fish moving up. There may have been fish traveling in the deeper (6í) channel, but there were no typical jumpers or fish wakes during the entire period.

    We moved up above Slide-hole for a little while as I fished to clean the salt water out of my gear, I saw a few dead and decaying pinks, dead kings and one or two decaying coho. The water through that section was mostly less than two feet deep and warmer than gauging station was reading Iím sure. Talked to a local couple who was there from Homer, they guy had had one on the whole time they were there. they had decided to fish eggs under a bobber. The water flow was too slow to even drift fish a small fly.

    Unfortunately this is the same condition in many of southcentral small/ spring fed streams. The Ninilchik and Deep Creek rivers are in the same condition. Several reports around the state of failing streams with dead stacked up bright silvers, etc. Unless there is a lot of rain soon, I fear there will be more instream spawning failures to come. Likely to lose cohorts of fish out in the return years from thse spawning periods. Too low, too hot and little to no dissolved O2. Welcome to the new normal.

    Even the owner of the Fly Box in Anchor Point is willing to admit it is likely not to get better the rest of the fishing fall. So, if you believe in prayer, Iíd say go for rain.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
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    84

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RaptorMan View Post
    My wife and I went to the Anchor yesterday to check out the situation. I had looked at the USGS gauging station the night before after seeing how low the water was driving by previously. The Anchor is experiencing some of the lowest flows ever recorded. The avg flow for this date is about 127 cfs. The gauge was marking 53 cfs the day-before-yesterday. Water temperature at the gauging station was 66*-68*.

    I fished the incoming high tide (quite low at 16.2í) in the afternoon with a flyrod and two known coho producers within a stones throw of the mouth of the river. i fished an hour and a half across the high tide and saw no fish moving up. There may have been fish traveling in the deeper (6í) channel, but there were no typical jumpers or fish wakes during the entire period.

    We moved up above Slide-hole for a little while as I fished to clean the salt water out of my gear, I saw a few dead and decaying pinks, dead kings and one or two decaying coho. The water through that section was mostly less than two feet deep and warmer than gauging station was reading Iím sure. Talked to a local couple who was there from Homer, they guy had had one on the whole time they were there. they had decided to fish eggs under a bobber. The water flow was too slow to even drift fish a small fly.

    Unfortunately this is the same condition in many of southcentral small/ spring fed streams. The Ninilchik and Deep Creek rivers are in the same condition. Several reports around the state of failing streams with dead stacked up bright silvers, etc. Unless there is a lot of rain soon, I fear there will be more instream spawning failures to come. Likely to lose cohorts of fish out in the return years from thse spawning periods. Too low, too hot and little to no dissolved O2. Welcome to the new normal.

    Even the owner of the Fly Box in Anchor Point is willing to admit it is likely not to get better the rest of the fishing fall. So, if you believe in prayer, Iíd say go for rain.

    Appreciate the report, a very bad situation in deed. Seems our fishing tackle are starting to become collectibles or museum pieces.
    With the kenai kings becoming extinct it appears silvers are now the money makers along with reds for the tourists. This summers lack of rain and sunshine really warmed up waters everywhere. I guess Iíll try fishing the derby down in Seward and hopefully put a few fish away. thanks again for the report, pray for rain

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