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Thread: The Excruciatingly Official Unit 13 Caribou Thread (2019-2020)

  1. #41
    Member Jimw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mcc4 View Post
    Hunted the CCUA on the opener, lots of people and no caribou. Got farther in on the 11th and away from all the people. Found 4 cows and with some persuading from my girlfriend (she was a little sore from day 1 and didn't want to hear me say we had to hike further the next day lol) we decided to tag one of them. First caribou for me and first time hunting EVER for my girlfriend. Obviously not the biggest the caribou, but we feel very blessed and thankful to have harvested her and the meat was unbelievably tender when I was processing it all. We had a fantastic time together. I couldn't have planned for this trip to go any better. I will post a more detailed write up later!
    Congrats!!!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimw View Post
    Congrats!!!
    Thank you!

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonath View Post
    I get that. It is basic. And I agree. But what is the intent of the law being non-motorized... Maybe to keep trails in good shape, maybe to keep noise down in an effort to provide a ďwildernessĒ experience, maybe to prevent guys from hauling in/out lots of gear? All of these I support, however I just donít see how ebikes really change any of that. I will be right there ready to pitch a fit if 2/4stroke dirt bikes you can hear coming from miles show up, but itís just kinda a stretch to me to allow bikes of any kind if your really just after a foot race. I also canít help but think of the wilderness areas in the states Iíve spent time in, where horses are allowed to destroy anything in site, but boy you canít ride a bike anywhere. Seems like a similar lack of logic here, however I agree the way is rule is currently written is very clear.

    On a different note regarding the electric trolling motors, or for that matter electric ice augers... are those as clearly omitted in the regs?
    My interpretation for the reasoning behind the non-motorized areas is to provide opportunity to people without motorized offroad vehicles a fair chance at harvesting an animal. Anyone can ride a wheeler into an area, shoot a caribou, load it onto their wheeler and head out. Fewer people want/have to work for it with their legs. Its not like all of unit 13 is walk in only, just a small portion for those who want or have to walk in.

    Herb Brooks, the head coach for the 1980 US Men's Olympic hockey team, had a saying. "The legs feed the wolf." Whenever I'm getting my ass kicked on a hike or a pack out I start muttering that to myself. Puts a smile on my face everytime!

  4. #44
    Member Mammoth Hunter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by iyouktug View Post
    Holding off until one is right in front of you and Jakes face!
    That's already happened. We were on a combo hunt and it was a brisk morning up high...well we don't really like to talk about it
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    We spent three days last week biking (non-motorized mountain bikes) in about 6 miles on the McLaren Summit Trail North of the Hwy each day and chasing caribou around (I mean, stalking) on foot off-trail. There were several groups of 3-10 caribou roaming the big open valley east of the Summit Trail and up into the maze of little ridges around where the trail turns east toward 7-mile Lake. Only a few hunters on foot and a couple of other bicycles on the trail. Weather was partly cloudy, rain showers blowing through, windy and/or raining at night, and a spritz of snow on the hills to the North by Saturday morning.
    We got a medium-sized cow and packed it out about 1.5 miles on foot (oof!) and then about 5-6 miles by bike (so much easier, but still work) on the Summit Trail. This is only the fourth hunt, second kill, and first try at packing it out by bicycle for my husband and I, so we're stoked, but still have a lot to learn...

  6. #46
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    That's pretty stinkin' cool. Hopefully with conscientious meat care the early season caribou will be delicious. What you just described as far as effort and commitment is loads more than many life-long Alaskans will ever do- but they'll complain about opportunity and people and blah blah blah. BTW, bred and raised here- nearly 42 years now. Hunting, fishing, and subsisting (by personal and family choice, not by circumstance) my entire life. I've witnessed things change dramatically, but we continue to live in a paradise many people can not even fathom.

  7. #47
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    Perhaps the haters/people who donít understand ebikes could explain to me how this is a different experience then using an ebike? Using a mechanical vehicle to access a zone, then hunt in on foot. Same experience either way. Sounds like a good hunt though either way. Congrats!

    Quote Originally Posted by snow chicken View Post
    We spent three days last week biking (non-motorized mountain bikes) in about 6 miles on the McLaren Summit Trail North of the Hwy each day and chasing caribou around (I mean, stalking) on foot off-trail. There were several groups of 3-10 caribou roaming the big open valley east of the Summit Trail and up into the maze of little ridges around where the trail turns east toward 7-mile Lake. Only a few hunters on foot and a couple of other bicycles on the trail. Weather was partly cloudy, rain showers blowing through, windy and/or raining at night, and a spritz of snow on the hills to the North by Saturday morning.
    We got a medium-sized cow and packed it out about 1.5 miles on foot (oof!) and then about 5-6 miles by bike (so much easier, but still work) on the Summit Trail. This is only the fourth hunt, second kill, and first try at packing it out by bicycle for my husband and I, so we're stoked, but still have a lot to learn...

  8. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonath View Post
    Perhaps the haters/people who donít understand ebikes could explain to me how this is a different experience then using an ebike? Using a mechanical vehicle to access a zone, then hunt in on foot. Same experience either way. Sounds like a good hunt though either way. Congrats!
    Cause an evoke does most of the work! Hence the NON motorized areas! But hey thatís just me, and ADF&G hahahahaha. Always wondered when they would be for sure banned. Donít own one, donít want one, peddling a fat bike is amazing. If not, then maybe stop drinking soda, get off the couch, spend real money for an ATV.


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  9. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by snow chicken View Post
    We spent three days last week biking (non-motorized mountain bikes) in about 6 miles on the McLaren Summit Trail North of the Hwy each day and chasing caribou around (I mean, stalking) on foot off-trail. There were several groups of 3-10 caribou roaming the big open valley east of the Summit Trail and up into the maze of little ridges around where the trail turns east toward 7-mile Lake. Only a few hunters on foot and a couple of other bicycles on the trail. Weather was partly cloudy, rain showers blowing through, windy and/or raining at night, and a spritz of snow on the hills to the North by Saturday morning.
    We got a medium-sized cow and packed it out about 1.5 miles on foot (oof!) and then about 5-6 miles by bike (so much easier, but still work) on the Summit Trail. This is only the fourth hunt, second kill, and first try at packing it out by bicycle for my husband and I, so we're stoked, but still have a lot to learn...
    Single wheel trailers are best. Never been on that trail but have biked out a sheep on the bone and life size hide on one bike and trailer after buddy helped pack it down to the trail. Seat post was $150 but worth it- Thud Buster. Locally around $180. Donít have my BOB trailer modified to fit my fat bike yet n sold the 29er but have the axle for the fatty. Burley makes a beefy trailer thatís single wheel w a fatty tire for $450? Think I seen that post here as well somewhere.


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    [QUOTE=akrstabout;1669748]Single wheel trailers are best. Never been on that trail but have biked out a sheep on the bone and life size hide on one bike and trailer after buddy helped pack it down to the trail. Seat post was $150 but worth it- Thud Buster. Locally around $180. Donít have my BOB trailer modified to fit my fat bike yet n sold the 29er but have the axle for the fatty. Burley makes a beefy trailer thatís single wheel w a fatty tire for $450? Think I seen that post here as well somewhere.

    Yeah, I've had a Thud buster on a previous bike, and didn't like the way it tossed me around when riding unloaded for fun on single track. It might be nice for this sort of thing, though, because I spent way more time in the seat than usual with that load, and the bumps did not feel good.

    What trailer did you use for the sheep? We have been eyeing trailers, but my dad has warned us away after his experience bike packing.

  11. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonath View Post
    Perhaps the haters/people who don’t understand ebikes could explain to me how this is a different experience then using an ebike? Using a mechanical vehicle to access a zone, then hunt in on foot. Same experience either way. Sounds like a good hunt though either way. Congrats!
    The difference is that riding a mountain bike is still a lot of work, and all of that work is muscle powered. The experiences of biking and hiking are more similar (type 2 fun) than any kind of motorized transport. We hiked in on previous hunts, including packing caribou #1 out 3 miles on foot. Adding a bicycle simply extends the range from the trailhead at which we can stalk a bou. Biking 6 miles fully loaded leaves you as tired as hiking 1-2 miles, and both are completely different than throwing a load on an ATV or e bike and motoring on out.
    Both of us have used ATVs growing up and at work. My husband rode an e fat bike as a commuter for a winter in Anchorage, then took the motor off last summer to use it in the CCUA. We don't have an ATV and don't want one. We appreciate the CUAs because the fundamental difference between motorized and non motorized is the range: any fat ass (or fit ass) can drive an ATV or e bike 50 miles in a day, but muscle power only gets you a fraction of that, so it just makes sense to separate the two.

    Thanks for the congrats. It was quite a good hunt, and can't wait for the next one! Backstrap tonight was delicious!

  12. #52
    Member 0321Tony's Avatar
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    I've packed one animal out (a moose) on a bike and it was not a pleasant experience. I didn't have a trailer so it was on my back and my seat was narrow, needless to say I was a little sore and walking funny for a couple days. I made two trips like that 6 miles round trip and each trip I felt like my sphincter was on the receiving end of a gay porn gang bang, after that I parked the bike and did the rest on foot. If I had to do it again I would find a bigger seat and a trailer.

  13. #53
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    You seem not to understand the purpose of the youth hunt. It was a small number of tags, with a season before the madness begins. My son drew the tag and harvested a nice 3 year old bull. My hunting partner's son also drew the tag and killed an older cow. With both animals, there wasn't intense pressure from 2000 people being in the area, so our boys had time to set up good and ethical shots. It gave us more time to have the boys cut the caribou up, teaching them what to do, but having them do the work. And the whole time we didn't have people shooting over our heads at other caribou. You can get as angry as you want about this hunt, but it's here to stay and it's a wonderful thing.

    Quote Originally Posted by akbgdg View Post
    The new youth hunt? What a joke! Kinda like all the caribou that died from drowning and all the caribou that disappeared in Canada. Now....there is a miracle of birth that has caused a population explosion! If you don't feel manipulated, you are not paying attention! Who proposed the youth hunt for this unit? Pay attention! It wasn't proposed by ADF&G! Why would anyone propose a youth hunt for an area that has this status, which allows any family member to hunt caribou and guarantees a permit? I think if a baby was still sucking on it's mommies tit, it could legally shoot a caribou in this unit under the tier 1 permit?
    An unarmed man is subject, an armed man is a citizen.

  14. #54
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    Just saw this and figured I would share:

    https://www.adfg.alaska.gov/static/applications/webintra/wcnews/2019/releases/08-08-2019.pdf


    2019 Nelchina Caribou Hunt Quotas(Glennallen) Ė The departmentís July 2019 post-calving photocensus identified a minimum of 53,500 cariboufor the Nelchina caribou herd. Roughly 35,850 caribou are adults, while there are roughly 17,650 calves thisyear. This leaves enough adults to allow permit holders to harvest either sex in 2019, and quotas for each huntare not likely to be reached during the fall season, allowing all hunts to run the duration of their scheduledseasons. Harvest will be evaluated after September 20th to determine if all hunts will re-open for the regularlyscheduled winter season on October 21st. At this time, it is expected that all hunts (except YC495) will re-openfor the winter season.

    The department has determined an initial 2019 quota of 3,950 caribou harvested from the Nelchina herd. Withan expected federal harvest of 500 caribou, this leaves 3,450 caribou for state-managed hunts. Initial 2019quotas for state-managed hunts are as follows:
    Hunt Number of 2019 Permits 2019 Quota
    YC495 200 100
    DC485 400 250
    CC001 811 400
    RC561 2,788 1,350
    RC562 2,884 1,350
    3,450

    The Alaska Department of Fish and Game issued an emergency order on July 31st, 2019 to change the baglimit to any caribou for all Unit 13 state-managed caribou hunts (RC561, RC562, CC001, DC485, and YC495).Hunt updates and additional information will be available on the Nelchina hotline at (907) 267-2304.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jonath View Post
    Perhaps the haters/people who donít understand ebikes could explain to me how this is a different experience then using an ebike? Using a mechanical vehicle to access a zone, then hunt in on foot. Same experience either way. Sounds like a good hunt though either way. Congrats!
    I'm not sure of your infatuation/obsession with ebikes (and really don't care). A law was made - "non-motorized access" and it was enacted in straight forward language that anyone (well, almost anyone) could understand on one reading - if it utilizes a motor to provide locomotion, it is NOT LEGAL. (PERIOD) Rant all you like, it won't change anything.

  16. #56
    Member MaximumPenetration's Avatar
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    The whole "non-motorized" thing is a joke. This is an actual case where non-motorized applies because the bike does have a motor, while an ATV doesn't have a motor, it has an engine. Motors run on electricity, engines run on combustion.

    Quote Originally Posted by Frostbitten View Post
    ...with a motor.
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    Quote Originally Posted by MaximumPenetration View Post
    The whole "non-motorized" thing is a joke. This is an actual case where non-motorized applies because the bike does have a motor, while an ATV doesn't have a motor, it has an engine. Motors run on electricity, engines run on combustion.
    Just donít bring either into the non motorized hunting zones,...itís pretty clear

  18. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by MaximumPenetration View Post
    The whole "non-motorized" thing is a joke. This is an actual case where non-motorized applies because the bike does have a motor, while an ATV doesn't have a motor, it has an engine. Motors run on electricity, engines run on combustion.
    ....yet you clearly understand that you can use neither in the CUA.

  19. #59
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    [QUOTE=snow chicken;1669753]
    Quote Originally Posted by akrstabout View Post
    Single wheel trailers are best. Never been on that trail but have biked out a sheep on the bone and life size hide on one bike and trailer after buddy helped pack it down to the trail. Seat post was $150 but worth it- Thud Buster. Locally around $180. Donít have my BOB trailer modified to fit my fat bike yet n sold the 29er but have the axle for the fatty. Burley makes a beefy trailer thatís single wheel w a fatty tire for $450? Think I seen that post here as well somewhere.

    Yeah, I've had a Thud buster on a previous bike, and didn't like the way it tossed me around when riding unloaded for fun on single track. It might be nice for this sort of thing, though, because I spent way more time in the seat than usual with that load, and the bumps did not feel good.

    What trailer did you use for the sheep? We have been eyeing trailers, but my dad has warned us away after his experience bike packing.
    The trailer I have is the BOB w the shock model. But the shock isnít necessary and takes up space. The plain trailer is just fine- use to have it n thought I needed the shock model. Bought 29er fork separate n sold the 26Ē stock one.

    I bought a shim for the stem n fit to my fat bike. The way mine is set it doesnít toss me at me at all. Sags a bit when I sit on it. Set it n never messed w it, even when carrying a heavy pack.

    The thud buster is amazing. Mine came w different polymer bushings to set the action.


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    Hit Dickey lake and tangles this weekend. Didn't see much. Few moving way off in the hills. Saw 1 rack heading from McCLaren on a truck. That was it.
    Makin fur fins and feathers fly.

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