Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: overhang debate

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    NE Fairbanks
    Posts
    90

    Default overhang debate

    so on my eve ends I have a 18 inch overhang. on my gable ends I want to have 2 foot overhangs. Over the years I have heard outriggers and out looks both used to support the gable board (2x6). The debate comes in as one builder said I can run 2x4 on 4 foot centers to support the overhanging gable end board. Another builder said it has to be 2 foot on center to support the snow load. Another said that he runs only a 1 foot overhang in town with supports every 4 feet. Oh and I am running engineered trusses with 5/8 cdx with metal on top....fairbanks

    thoughts ?

  2. #2
    Member cdubbin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    KP, the dingleberry of Alaska
    Posts
    2,138

    Default

    This is what I do:
    run let-in 2x4s back to the SECOND rafter in, at your preferred spacing (48" is fine...32" or 24" would obviously be better)....snap a line on the lookout ends, cut them off straight, attach barge rafter. Then I nail a block of rafter material alongside the lookout back to the wall....adds compressive strength, and gives you something to nail your soffits to...

    "– Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

  3. #3

    Default

    I like cdubbins method, however I would never cut a truss to do it like he has cut the 1st rafter to get to the second to end nail it in. His rafters are large enough for that not to be an issue. A 2x6 top chord truss is too small to do that and have any meat left. Personally, I just make my lookouts go back to the first rafter or truss feeling that a flat lookout doesnt gain any strength from being longer. That is not a viewpoint backed up by engineering knowledge. I also use 2 x 6s for lookouts, but that’s just me. Not sure if I would use this method at all if 10 feet of snow was a possibility. I always use 24 inch overhangs, unless other factors are present.

  4. #4
    Member cdubbin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    KP, the dingleberry of Alaska
    Posts
    2,138

    Default

    It's a simple rule of cantilevering to run in twice the length of what sticks out....
    Talk to your truss manufacturer about it, they can set you up with thicker or dropped chords to accommodate overhang framing...
    "– Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

  5. #5
    Supporting Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    2,717

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PtMac View Post
    I like cdubbins method, however I would never cut a truss to do it like he has cut the 1st rafter to get to the second to end nail it in. His rafters are large enough for that not to be an issue. A 2x6 top chord truss is too small to do that and have any meat left. Personally, I just make my lookouts go back to the first rafter or truss feeling that a flat lookout doesnt gain any strength from being longer. That is not a viewpoint backed up by engineering knowledge. I also use 2 x 6s for lookouts, but that’s just me. Not sure if I would use this method at all if 10 feet of snow was a possibility. I always use 24 inch overhangs, unless other factors are present.
    Same here. Lookouts on 4' centers let into the gable truss which is sheeted so strength isn't an issue even for a 2x4 top chord. Nail into the first truss in.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

  6. #6
    Member ChugiakTinkerer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Chugiak, Alaska
    Posts
    804

    Default

    I ran my outlookers just like in cdubbin's picture. Overhang of 24" on a 48" spacing. You should know that the IRC only allows for a 12" rake, so if you have a building inspector make sure they're on board.

  7. #7
    Member cdubbin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    KP, the dingleberry of Alaska
    Posts
    2,138

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ChugiakTinkerer View Post
    I ran my outlookers just like in cdubbin's picture. Overhang of 24" on a 48" spacing. You should know that the IRC only allows for a 12" rake, so if you have a building inspector make sure they're on board.
    That's a specific requirement for steel roof framing....pretty sure the code does not address wood gable overhang framing...24" is my standard, although I have gone bigger with no problems...
    "– Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

  8. #8
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Talkeetna
    Posts
    5,888

    Default

    With trusses, many of the builders I supply use a 5 1/2" drop gable truss to allow a 2x6 on edge for the 24" lookouts 48" o.c.. They then use a Simpson LU26 joist hanger upside down to add strength where it butt nails into the first full height truss. This doesn't allow for the 2:1 cantilever that cdubbin likes, but it's more than strong enough with the Simpson resupport. I hope this makes sense, and I wish I had a picture.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

  9. #9
    Member ChugiakTinkerer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Chugiak, Alaska
    Posts
    804

    Default

    Totally makes sense to me Doug. The inverted Simpson bracket probably gives better support to the overhang than a simple 2:1 cantilever.

    The steel framed roof restriction on rake rings a bell, sorry for the rabbit trail miscue. I just remember it being an odd distinction. I'm all about the big gable overhang.

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    NE Fairbanks
    Posts
    90

    Default

    thanks for all the replys, guess Its good for me to go with 48 inch centers. got to get them and all barge and boards mounted in the next few days.

    Then we ( son and I)are going to use a z lift and get plywood up there. Cant figure an easier way as it is 30 feet to top of gable, 22 feet to bottom of rafters. Im getting too old to take anymore falls, trying to figure the best and easiest way.
    figured after first row or two we could then tie off and just use z lift for transporting. need 40 sheets total of 5/8ths up there.
    just hope its not raining
    looks like I will beat my goal of getting a roof on before the snow.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •