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Thread: Welcome to the Alaska Outdoors University!

  1. #1
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Apr 1999
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    Anchorage, Alaska
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    5,661

    Default Welcome to the Alaska Outdoors University!

    Hi folks,

    Today I am announcing a brand-new addition to our site, the Alaska Outdoors University. For several years I have been writing detailed content for the site, and while this kind of content will always be a part of our site, I believed we needed something more. Something that provides solid information with a more personal touch. There are a lot of voices online, and you don’t always know who’s talking, or whether they are a credible source. At the same time, many of us lack the coaches and mentors previous generations had, to teach us the skills and principles needed for our participation in the outdoors.

    The Alaska Outdoors University seeks to put qualified mentors together with learners in order to foster safer, better-informed, and more meaningful experiences in the Alaska outdoors. We are launching with 30 sessions on Alaska hunt planning. All of them are in video format. These are very detailed sessions that cover the bulk of my hunt planning material that I share with my consulting clients. It is approximately 30 hours in length, and covers all aspects of the planning process. This is the first installment of four; the next three will cover Logistics, Gear, and Field Techniques. We are monetizing this expansion primarily through user fees. This will allow us to bring on other content providers who can produce material on other topics you need to know about.

    If you'd like to take it for a test drive, you can visit the Alaska Outdoors University site without signing up. Feel free to click around in there and explore, and be sure to watch the Introduction video. It explains more about it. A quick visit will show you the layout, and the entire lineup of available sessions. CLICK THIS LINK to pop over for a look around.

    We have two subscription levels in the Alaska Outdoors University: monthly, and annual. Both are set to auto-renew, but you can opt out of auto-renew if you prefer. Keep in mind that when your subscription runs out, you will no longer have access to the courses. To sign up, click on the Membership link at the top of the forums.

    I hope you enjoy the Alaska Outdoors University! It’s the next big step in our efforts to grow the site to meet the needs of our users.

    Best regards,

    Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself or guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Addresses
    http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    https://akoutdoorsuniversity.com
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  2. #2
    Member
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    Sep 2014
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    Alaska
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    Default

    This sounds like it will be a very useful tool.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

  3. #3

    Default

    We longtime Alaskans don't realize what we know, it is so much more then we are aware of, here is a "Copy" of a post I made this morning on a "Survival Forum", that is somewhat relevant.
    _____________________________________________
    _____________________________________________

    "I have spent most of the last fifty years living and working in "Remote" Alaska wilderness. Places that are only accessible by bush plane, no road or trail for a few hundred miles. I know things because of this, but I am not aware of my knowing these things, because of my immersion in that environment.

    Let me give an example. While guiding hunters, there is sometimes conflict because I know things they don't. I remember a conflict when we observed a quality animal the hunter wanted. But it was about two miles away, by line of sight and a four mile hike the way we needed to hike to get in position.

    What the hunter could see between where we were and needed to be was a grassy field. What I could see was a marsh of knee deep water. He was very upset that I insisted we go around what he viewed as a beautiful field of grass.

    See the point I am attempting to make is, I could tell from experience, just looking at the color and texture of the vegetation, and how the vegetation moved in the breeze, what was hidden, the swamp.

    But, because I had been immersed for many decades in that environment, I did not know that I knew that, in the same way a fish does not know water, or the fish is not aware of the water.

    What I feel is needed in the prepping and survival area is kind'a like that. See it took the hunters vision, and pissed-off'ness, for me to see consciously, and be consciously aware of what I knew, at a different level of knowingness.

    I believe there so so much more to learn in this area of prepping and survival, but we will have to work to find it. We need to get past the easy questions, and the prepackaged menu of acceptable answers, or replies. We need to get past the entertainment of survival and prepping, and for the most part that is what Prepping for Survival forums are is entertainment."

  4. #4
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    5,661

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    We longtime Alaskans don't realize what we know, it is so much more then we are aware of, here is a "Copy" of a post I made this morning on a "Survival Forum", that is somewhat relevant.
    _____________________________________________
    _____________________________________________

    "I have spent most of the last fifty years living and working in "Remote" Alaska wilderness. Places that are only accessible by bush plane, no road or trail for a few hundred miles. I know things because of this, but I am not aware of my knowing these things, because of my immersion in that environment.

    Let me give an example. While guiding hunters, there is sometimes conflict because I know things they don't. I remember a conflict when we observed a quality animal the hunter wanted. But it was about two miles away, by line of sight and a four mile hike the way we needed to hike to get in position.

    What the hunter could see between where we were and needed to be was a grassy field. What I could see was a marsh of knee deep water. He was very upset that I insisted we go around what he viewed as a beautiful field of grass.

    See the point I am attempting to make is, I could tell from experience, just looking at the color and texture of the vegetation, and how the vegetation moved in the breeze, what was hidden, the swamp.

    But, because I had been immersed for many decades in that environment, I did not know that I knew that, in the same way a fish does not know water, or the fish is not aware of the water.

    What I feel is needed in the prepping and survival area is kind'a like that. See it took the hunters vision, and pissed-off'ness, for me to see consciously, and be consciously aware of what I knew, at a different level of knowingness.

    I believe there so so much more to learn in this area of prepping and survival, but we will have to work to find it. We need to get past the easy questions, and the prepackaged menu of acceptable answers, or replies. We need to get past the entertainment of survival and prepping, and for the most part that is what Prepping for Survival forums are is entertainment."
    I agree completely, and have had similar experiences with clients in the past. One of the most memorable was a moose we spotted from a bench high above the valley. The bull was three miles off, but to the hunter it looked like a walk in the park. What he didn't understand is that once you are on flat ground with them, moose can be very difficult to locate in a forest of mixed black spruce, willow, and assorted other understory. Not to mention the fact that by the time we would have gotten there, the bull would already be bedded down for the afternoon. The hunter wasn't taking no for an answer and it was early in the hunt, so I decided to teach him a lesson. We descended our perch. Two hours later found us "quietly bushwhacking" (you know what I mean) our way across the valley floor. Wouldn't you know it? I spotted the bull bedded by a spruce tree, and we ended up killing him. My hunter looked at me with that "I told you so" look, and we got a laugh out of it. He had no idea how wrong he was, but the cards were with us that day. We got lucky.

    I agree on having lots of stuff locked up in our brains that we don't even know is there. In prepping for these seminars, I intended to do a section on how to identify moose habitat from aerial photos, something I have been doing for years. I got into the middle of it when I realized that many hunters have no idea what willows look like on the ground, much less why they are important to moose. So I backed up and ended up doing sessions on moose biology and habitat requirements, what the various forage plants and habitats look like on the ground, and what they look like from 500 feet up, before going to aerial photos that were taken from high altitude. It was a good exercise, but it delayed me by several weeks. I think I ended up with four or five extra sessions just on that topic.

    Excellent points!
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself or guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Addresses
    http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    https://akoutdoorsuniversity.com
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

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