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Thread: 19 ft Muskrat final dimensions:

  1. #1
    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    Default 19 ft Muskrat final dimensions:

    The 19 ft. Muskrat male plug is in progress. I won't be able to get to the mold construction until August. I may test the first hull out of the mold during September for moose and caribou using a 12 hp Honda GX690 powered surface drive or the 9.8 Tohatsu.

    The final dimensions will be:
    19 ft long

    52 inches width at center

    18 inches of depth at center.

    The height of the bow will be 30 inches.

    The flat planing surface at the stern will be 26 inches. This will allow the canoe to get on-step, rather than dig in like other motorized canoe sterns.

    The stern width over the top of the end caps will be 35 inches.

    I guesstimate the weight will be right at 150 lbs. Which will make it car-topable on smaller SUV's, medium and small sized trucks, which is impossible with my larger freighters. The larger ones only safely fit atop full sized trucks with full steel ladder racks bolted to the truck bed, or better yet, on a trailer.

    Though I originally wanted to design a 19 footer with a wine glass stern, this is a no-go. In the end, it is difficult to design a boat for a 60 lb motor that simply doesn't exist anymore. The nice 8 hp two stroke twins haven't been offered in the U.S. market since at least 2003, when they banned two strokes. You can get new ones elsewhere in the world, but not the United States, because of EPA. Other countries like the U.K. and Australia are following the suit and those nice portable two stroke twins like the 60 lb 8 hp yamaha and the 56 lb 9.8 tohatsu will no longer be for sale.

    The single cylinder 4-6 hp fourstroke motors are all about the same weight at 55-60 lbs, but not enough power to get up our swift rivers. The next best thing: The 80 lb Tohatsu 9.8, which is the lightest twin cylinder, would be too heavy, with too aggressive of a prop diameter for a wine glass stern.

    And so: The 19 ft muskrat is an optimized hull for the smaller displacement 12 hp Copperhead, the 12 hp Backwater Swomp Runner Kit motor, or the 9.8 Tohatsu. Another good one would be a used 15 hp two stroke. These usually weigh in at 70 lbs or so.

    For the guys that want to lift a standard outboard, it will come with an optional adjustable stationary lift. It'll retrofit over my existing tig welded, cnc-cut aluminum exo-skeleton transom system. The stationary lift will be made of the same construction and will weigh about 1.5 lbs. The stationary lift can be removed, if switching to a Copperhead Surface Drive or a Backwater Swomp lite kit motor (not to be confused with the Chinese rip-off kits). Backwater kits are built by an Army Veteran with 25 years in the mud motor industry)

    The hull construction will be the the same biaxial cloth, flexible epoxy resin and foam core construction. The same white ash gunwales, seats and spray rails. The seats will have the same mountaineering webbing weave. The seats and gunwales will be a little smaller width. Instead of 2x2 seat frames, the 19 ft. Muskrat will have 1.5"x1.5" seat frames. Perfect for a maximum width of 52 inches.

    The 19 ft is a work boat for a family on a budget, so I won't be offering it with UHMW to keep the costs down. The epoxy hull is plenty abrasion resistant. I actually do biaxial/epoxy skid plates on damaged double enders or wine glass-stern canoes made of royalex.

    The hull will be made from layers of 18 oz cloth, as opposed to the 26 oz cloth I use on the big freighters. This 18 oz cloth is plenty sufficient for a boat only spanning 52 inches center width, as opposed to the 60 inches of the big freighters. It will also soak up less resin, to keep costs down.

    The boats will be offered as a kit boat: Completed bare hull, seats, gunwales, exoskeleton transom, bow cap, hardware and paint. The owner will have to fair, sand, and finish the boat, to add further value. It will come with an instructional dvd, with all the tips n tricks to get a good finish. But, these ain't restored corvettes, they're moose toboggans and fish totes that look much better scratched up, covered in moose blood or fish slime. So, even a couple of hunting buddies inhaling a large quantity of beer could probably finish the boat in the smallest garage space. A miter saw, one paint brush, two paint rollers, a caulking gun a cordless drill, a ratchet with 1/2" socket, a rubber mallet and some c-clamps would be about all that is required to finish the boat.. The price will be about $5800

    To put this into perspective: A little AIRE 146 DD raft with a frame and motor mount goes for about $7000

  2. #2
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    Sounds like a fine skinny of big water canoe
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

  3. #3
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    Sounds interesting, Mainer...

  4. #4
    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    Thanks Amigo and Piper. There is no shortage of decent paddling canoes in Alaska. But when you add subsistence activities to the mix: Hauling hunting camps, fish camps, dipnetting, tending gill nets, hauling heavy loads of moose meat or fish, this really requires initial stability. Secondary stability is over-rated, over emphasized and barely applicable in real-world Alaskan subsistence conditions.

    Hence the 52 inches width at the gunwale. This will be stable enough, that you could walk across the gunwale of an unloaded canoe without tipping it. Trying to make headway against the Yukon or Tanana rivers lightly loaded is a big deal. A 9.8 Tohatsu, or a 12 hp mud motor would work very well.

    I could only dream of cheap costs, like having some Vietnamese or Chinese sweat-shop roll out and glue cheap PVC raft material, or use a cheap 55 gallon drum of polyester resin and basic fiberglass cloths.

    In the long run, a boat hull should last at least two generations without much fuss. That type of longevity requires good initial investment in American made raw materials. You can add all the high-gloss additive to the gel coat and pop-rivet some cheap aluminum c-channel over the top of the stern. You'll save some money, but it's no substitute for a back bone.

    High end epoxy, marine-grade foam core, biaxial cloths and tig-welded cnc cut aluminum, all made in the United States, is a recipe that I won't sway from.

    I've broken too many canoes to ever consider a cheaper route for my budget model.

  5. #5

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    Looks like a good one. I had plans for a 20 foot stitch and glue canoe square stern canoe with a flat area in the back. I think this one was a little longer than 26 inches. I can't find the plans and of course never built it. But it's been in the back of my mind ever since. This is along the same lines. Will be interested.
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