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Thread: New hydropower project on the Kenai Peninsula

  1. #1
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    Default New hydropower project on the Kenai Peninsula

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission just issued a final environmental impact statement on the Grant Lake Hydropower Project.

    If built, it would be located on the KP, near Moose Pass. There seems to be some local opposition. Not sure what the local impacts would be, but some folks have intervened and opposed the project.

    The link is here:

    https://www.ferc.gov/industries/hydr...01-19-FEIS.pdf

    This is just their environmental review of the project. A final licensing decision by FERC would be necessary if the project is to move forward.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cohoangler View Post
    Not sure what the local impacts would be, but some folks have intervened and opposed the project.
    The local impacts would be a road and increased access to grant lake, a 24 hr power house with associated noise and 24 hr lighting, and lowered water level in the lake, and rerouting the Historic Iditarod Trail.

    I don't live down there anymore, so i didn't attend any of the public meetings. I imagine what stings about this project is that its developed by Homer Electric Association, but Moose Pass is serviced by the Chugach Electric Association, so there wouldn't be much local benefit.

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    I'm not sure a project that has been studied since the 1950's would count as a new project.
    “I would rather have questions that can't be answered than answers that can't be questioned.” Physicist ― Richard Feynman


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    Quote Originally Posted by Patsfan54 View Post
    I'm not sure a project that has been studied since the 1950's would count as a new project.

    It's new because it has not been constructed. Energy projects can be studied for decades before they get licensed. This project would break new ground so this would be an original license (as opposed to an existing project, which needs to be relicensed periodically).

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cohoangler View Post
    It's new because it has not been constructed.
    If it hasn't been constructed then it doesn't exist except for on paper. This project has been around and studied for close to 70 years, it's certainly not new. I think you would be hard pressed to find an energy project anywhere that has that kind of longevity without being built or scrapped.
    “I would rather have questions that can't be answered than answers that can't be questioned.” Physicist ― Richard Feynman


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