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Thread: Clipper 17’ Prospector

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    Default Clipper 17’ Prospector

    Anybody have any experience with the Clipper 17’ Prospector? I’m looking at one in a Kevlar Duraflex layup.

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    Buy it. I have played around in a 16 and it has a great blend of tracking...maneuverability and capacity. The Clipper lay-ups are great and the duraflex really tough as well. The 17 would be even better!

    https://paddling.com/gear/clipper-ca...or-16-1-canoe/

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    imo the ideal canoe size and shape. and only heard good things about the duraflex

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    Quote Originally Posted by North61 View Post
    Buy it. I have played around in a 16 and it has a great blend of tracking...maneuverability and capacity. The Clipper lay-ups are great and the duraflex really tough as well. The 17 would be even better!

    https://paddling.com/gear/clipper-ca...or-16-1-canoe/

    Curious how the Duraflex does on sharp rocks?

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    Not sure. I know that the duraflex can have gelcoat on the surface and that is pretty abrasion resistant. The lay up has a lot of layers including kevlar so it should be pretty resistant to cuts. Never owned one though.

    From Clippers site

    Kevlar® Duraflex is a laminate designed to be exceptionally tough. It has no foam core or ribs. The hull is stiffened by up to ten layers of structural material. A minimum of four layers are used in side walls, close to the gunnels. A highly flexible resin is used to allow the laminate to elongate under extreme force. A Kevlar® Duraflex laminate may be gelcoated but will add up to 4+ pounds. The Duraflex layups will easily outperform plastic canoe hulls of the same shape. Not only will Kevlar® Duraflex be as tough or tougher, it will also retain its shape after years of use and is also considerably lighter.
    Watch the Clipper Canoes Kevlar® Duraflex “Hammer Test” video

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    Quote Originally Posted by North61 View Post
    Not sure. I know that the duraflex can have gelcoat on the surface and that is pretty abrasion resistant. The lay up has a lot of layers including kevlar so it should be pretty resistant to cuts. Never owned one though.

    From Clippers site

    Kevlar® Duraflex is a laminate designed to be exceptionally tough. It has no foam core or ribs. The hull is stiffened by up to ten layers of structural material. A minimum of four layers are used in side walls, close to the gunnels. A highly flexible resin is used to allow the laminate to elongate under extreme force. A Kevlar® Duraflex laminate may be gelcoated but will add up to 4+ pounds. The Duraflex layups will easily outperform plastic canoe hulls of the same shape. Not only will Kevlar® Duraflex be as tough or tougher, it will also retain its shape after years of use and is also considerably lighter.
    Watch the Clipper Canoes Kevlar® Duraflex “Hammer Test” video
    Anybody know what type of resin Clipper is using in their Duraflex layup?

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    Fiberglass canoes are laminated by hand using a high-grade isothalic resin. Each Clipper canoe is reinforced in the bow and stern with a minimum of two layers of Kevlar®, providing extra strength and abrasion resistance needed in these areas of high stress. Flotation tanks are glassed-in at both ends of the canoe in all layups, and are filled with bagged foam for added flotation.
    That's what they use in their straight fiberglass hulls. I have two of their fiberglass boats and it's a tough flexible system.

    There are two principle types of polyester resin used as standard laminating systems in the composites industry. Orthophthalic polyester resin is the standard economic resin used by many people. Isophthalic polyester resin is now becoming the preferred material in industries such as marine where its superior water resistance is desirable.

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    Quote Originally Posted by North61 View Post
    Fiberglass canoes are laminated by hand using a high-grade isothalic resin. Each Clipper canoe is reinforced in the bow and stern with a minimum of two layers of Kevlar®, providing extra strength and abrasion resistance needed in these areas of high stress. Flotation tanks are glassed-in at both ends of the canoe in all layups, and are filled with bagged foam for added flotation.
    That's what they use in their straight fiberglass hulls. I have two of their fiberglass boats and it's a tough flexible system.

    There are two principle types of polyester resin used as standard laminating systems in the composites industry. Orthophthalic polyester resin is the standard economic resin used by many people. Isophthalic polyester resin is now becoming the preferred material in industries such as marine where its superior water resistance is desirable.
    They finally answered my email, it is a vinyl ester blend. I prefer the marine epoxy.

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    Out of curiosity do any major makers use an epoxy in their lay-ups?

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    Quote Originally Posted by North61 View Post
    Out of curiosity do any major makers use an epoxy in their lay-ups?
    Souris is one of the bigger manufacturers that does... Mainer probably keeps up on this...

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    I really looked at this company for my portaging Freighter. https://www.kisseynewcanoecompany.com/sportsman

    65 pounds in Epoxy Kevlar. 4750 Canadian + 600.00 to ship from Saskatchewan vs about 1/2 that for my Clipper. Couldn't do it and I know the Mackenzie Sport will outlive me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pipercub View Post
    They finally answered my email, it is a vinyl ester blend. I prefer the marine epoxy.
    I do as well, that's why I've gone through hundreds of gallons of the stuff. Vinyl ester resin is more flexible than polyester, which is a good thing. On my older clipper canoe, it was sold to the Yukon River Inter-tribal Watershed Council for a Yukon River trip. Before heading out, I guess they discovered some cracks in the bottom that I wasn't aware of. I ended up purchasing them an epoxy resin repair kit, and after their repairs, off they went. Moose meat pushing the hull against a gravel bottom the season prior, was the cause of the cracks.

    Far as I know, I'm the only U.S. based canoe builder, using epoxy resin. In the five years I've been using it, I can say that I learn something new with each boat. Not all epoxies are created equal, and the more brittle ones are no more useful than a polyester/MEKP hull. Not a single one of my boats have come back for a crack in the hull. My first production canoe still goes up the kandik river, it's still in great shape. The customer has come back with some of it's fairing compound gouged off the side of the hull from severe impacts, but nothing has punched through.

    Piper, If you really want an epoxy based paddling canoe, you can build one fairly easily. Just like Ren Tolman advocated that the average guy could build his own skiff. Unlike the Tolman skiff, it'd be a bit easier: You'd have to build a one-time male plug, then lay the boat up on that. The male plug can be put together off a set of plans, cutting out your stations and strongback, or make your own hull design.

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    Building my own is my next plan. A guy definately starts to pick up some design ideas and the ultimate custom boat is a home build.

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