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Thread: Best Kachemak Bay boat??

  1. #1
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    Default Best Kachemak Bay boat??

    We are interested in getting a good Kachemak Bay boat. Safety is a #1 concern and we have been looking at Hewescrafts, 20'-22' SeaRunners and OceanPros, as well as other aluminum boats with outboards. We don't necessarily need to be able to sleep on the boat, just want to get across the bay to hike, camp, go fish and tool around all over the Bay, etc. We are unsure about the right hull angle-- should we get one with 14 degrees (like the Hewescraft Sportsman Pro-V)? OR go for the steeper Ocean Pro, etc.? Also, what would you recommend as a minimum HP for the outboard? Appreciate any advice you have, we're new at the ocean boat thing. Thanks!

  2. #2
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    I'm partial to Tolman skiffs, since their design was born on K-by. But since Renn has retired, your only option is to build your own, or try and find a used one.

    Ok, first figure out how many people and how many pounds of gear you will be carrying, that will dial you in to what size boat you need. While bigger boats are more comfortable, they are quite a bit more expensive to buy and opperate, so don't buy something so big that you can't afford to take it out.

    As far as the depth of the V, deeper v's cut the chop better, but rock more at rest and there is a debate about them taking more hp to push through the water.

    HP comes down to weight. I would add up what you typically plan to carry on the boat (safety equipment and electronics needs to be calculated in), the weight of the boat, the weight of fuel, weight of engine, and devide that by 25 to get a number for adequate power that will also have a reserve for times you carry more gear, and you won't be straining the engine at that loading. Multiply the hp by 40 to find out the maximum gross weight you can carry.

    While hard top's are more expensive, they definately increase the comfort on the water, and extend your season due to increased comfort. Even on a nice day, once you add a 25-30 mph windchill, you'll be piling on the clothes. Add some spray and/or rain and it can be purt near miserable.

    To your first point, safety, it's all in who's running the boat. A good skipper can pilot a 20' skiff in some scary seas, and a nimrod can sink a $200k 30 foot boat in conditions that aren't really that bad. Bigger boats are merely more comfortable, and allow you to run faster through moderate conditions that would beat you up on a smaller boat. When there is a small craft advisory, there is no reason to be out there.

  3. #3

    Default Boats

    There are lots of options out there. I have a 22' SeaRunner with a Hardtop and extended transom powered by a Yamaha 115. It's plenty of HP when there are four or less on board. With more than four I'm wishing for a 150. But no complaints about the boat or how I have it set up. A few things I would suggest and I'm sure others will have additional thougts. #1-I wouldn't go out into any saltwater without two motors. In my case I have the main and a 8hp kicker. #2 I have two VHF radios-you never know when one is going to go out (one is hardwired the other is handheld). #3 EPRIB/GPS-I never plan to have to use it but if the situation does arise then I'm ready. #4 Good charts and GPS (I have two GPS too one hardwired and one handheld). #5 If you haven't taken the USCG Auxilary boating course I'd highly recommend it even if (like me) you have many years of boating experience.

    Good luck
    Ruby at the end of a good day.

  4. #4
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    I'd also add cold water survival suits, if you're patient on e-bay you can pick them up for ~$100.

    I also agree on dual gps and vhf. I have the handheald in a ditch bag with spare batteries and fire starters. Grab the handheald vhf and get everyone together. Dual vhf is also handy if some of your group is ashore and some on the boat.

    The USCG aux has several boating courses, if the multiweek one doesn't work with your schedule, there is a homestudy followed up with a one day review and test.

    I went with the suzuki 140, more than enough power for my boat. I've had 5 and 7 on board, and we topped out at 33 nauts both times, I cruise at 25. More power simply allows you to carry more weight with less struggle on the motor. Also the bigger motors are more fuel efficient with heavier loads. You'll only regret the bigger motor when purchasing it, and if marginally powered, you'll regret that decision so long as you own the boat.

  5. #5

    Default Best skiff

    Tolmann Skiff. Period.

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