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Thread: Colt SAA's in Alaska?

  1. #41
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    " My big bores run best at 1,200 to 1,300 feet per second. After that, you’re just gaining recoil and noise."

    I don't think Mr. Linebaugh's comparison of the the two cartridges involves the standard 45 Colt 250 gr. lead bullet at 860 fps. At his seminars they do a LOT of penetration comparisons with different cartridges. I've never attended one but have read some of the findings, and they can be a bit surprising. John bases his opinions on actual shooting and results. If you read his writings he says that he is not slamming the 44, he just happens to like the 45 better.

    This comparison of the 45 Colt (heavy loads) and 44 Mags will never end. I have both and like them both very much. I have not yet found a critter that knew the difference.

    My original post concerned the Colt SAA and I just wondered if any of you guys that spend a lot of time in the bush carried one. I see a lot of advantages to the SAA. Durability and ease of repair in the field to name a few. If I were to choose one mine would be a 44 Special....how bout that?

    Dan

  2. #42
    Member gunbugs's Avatar
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    And here I thought this thread was about Colt SAA's in Alaska? Guess not.....
    "A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise, and independence to the mind."

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Muddy View Post
    " My big bores run best at 1,200 to 1,300 feet per second. After that, you’re just gaining recoil and noise."

    I don't think Mr. Linebaugh's comparison of the the two cartridges involves the standard 45 Colt 250 gr. lead bullet at 860 fps. At his seminars they do a LOT of penetration comparisons with different cartridges. I've never attended one but have read some of the findings, and they can be a bit surprising. John bases his opinions on actual shooting and results. If you read his writings he says that he is not slamming the 44, he just happens to like the 45 better.

    This comparison of the 45 Colt (heavy loads) and 44 Mags will never end. I have both and like them both very much. I have not yet found a critter that knew the difference.

    My original post concerned the Colt SAA and I just wondered if any of you guys that spend a lot of time in the bush carried one. I see a lot of advantages to the SAA. Durability and ease of repair in the field to name a few. If I were to choose one mine would be a 44 Special....how bout that?

    Dan
    I happen to have a 3rd Gen .44 special brand new still in the box.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Muddy View Post
    " My big bores run best at 1,200 to 1,300 feet per second. After that, you’re just gaining recoil and noise."

    I don't think Mr. Linebaugh's comparison of the the two cartridges involves the standard 45 Colt 250 gr. lead bullet at 860 fps. At his seminars they do a LOT of penetration comparisons with different cartridges. I've never attended one but have read some of the findings, and they can be a bit surprising. John bases his opinions on actual shooting and results. If you read his writings he says that he is not slamming the 44, he just happens to like the 45 better.

    This comparison of the 45 Colt (heavy loads) and 44 Mags will never end. I have both and like them both very much. I have not yet found a critter that knew the difference.

    My original post concerned the Colt SAA and I just wondered if any of you guys that spend a lot of time in the bush carried one. I see a lot of advantages to the SAA. Durability and ease of repair in the field to name a few. If I were to choose one mine would be a 44 Special....how bout that?

    Dan
    It's all in fun, but it can't help being educational.

    As to "ease of repair" of the SAA, perhaps you can explain.

    The breakage of my SAA 357, was the locking bolt. I gave it to "gunsmith of sorts", who said he cut his teeth on Single Action gun repair. (As I remember, I had already purchased the part.) When I got it back, it did NOT work, and he had worn a pronounced ring around the cylinder.

    I took it to a Real Gunsmith, who Sent it to Colt where it was repaired properly, but the "ring" remained.

    Somewhere along the line, I got the impression, and my experience bears that out, that the particular breakage had to do with "TIMING", and I'm convinced that such a repair, would not be easy, or something that could be accomplished in the field.

    The remedy, for this kind of problem is worthy of some consideration. I think a Satellite Phone along with a bag of spare parts might do. You could call and have Gunbugs flown in by helicopter, if he is willing to work on SAA revolvers.

    The other, later, repair, of a spring, I was able to accomplish myself, although it required some fitting.

    Anyway, at this point, I don't see "ease of repair" as an advantage of the SAA.

    Thanks

    Smitty of the North
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  5. #45
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    The likelihood of needing to repair a Redhawk in the field is pretty remote. Even if you used it for a jack handle. I don't haul around fragile handguns when my life might depend on it. I also don't use them for jack handles. And I don't subject them to loads they aren't designed for.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by SmokeRoss View Post
    The likelihood of needing to repair a Redhawk in the field is pretty remote. Even if you used it for a jack handle. I don't haul around fragile handguns when my life might depend on it. I also don't use them for jack handles. And I don't subject them to loads they aren't designed for.

    Or one could say.... "I don't subject myself to loads the Redhawk is designed for"
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and don’t have one, you’ll probably never need one again

  7. #47
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    I'm not even close to calling myself a gunsmith, but a Colt SAA (and a Winchester 1873) are about the only guns I can dis-assemble and put everything back in and it works. The cylinder bolt is about the only part that does need fitting, and I have a one in my spare parts bag. I have been able to drop in fit any spring that might break on one, and even dropped a cylinder bolt into one once and got it up and running. I've had main springs and trigger/bolt springs break but they are an easy fix. Hand springs are more of a challenge but can be done. Had a half cock notch break on my 44 Special recently, but gun was functional until permanent repairs were made. They're just pretty simple.

    SmokeRoss, you need to get that Colt 44 out and get it dirty. They are fantastic guns in a great cartridge. As for the Redhawk, don't break a hammer link unless you have a spare. If you DO have a spare, don't lose that tiny little pin I love my Redhawks too and thought they were indestructible but I can break an anvil so I shouldn't have been surprised when that little hook broke.

    Dan

  8. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smitty of the North View Post
    I betcha those loads are fun to shoot. (I'm being sarcastic. )
    Indeed....I don't enjoy it at all really. But "IF", and that's a big "IF", I can hit that furry pointy toothed critter with it, he/she won't like it either!.....lol.
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  9. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Muddy View Post
    I'm not even close to calling myself a gunsmith, but a Colt SAA (and a Winchester 1873) are about the only guns I can dis-assemble and put everything back in and it works. The cylinder bolt is about the only part that does need fitting, and I have a one in my spare parts bag. I have been able to drop in fit any spring that might break on one, and even dropped a cylinder bolt into one once and got it up and running. I've had main springs and trigger/bolt springs break but they are an easy fix. Hand springs are more of a challenge but can be done. Had a half cock notch break on my 44 Special recently, but gun was functional until permanent repairs were made. They're just pretty simple.

    SmokeRoss, you need to get that Colt 44 out and get it dirty. They are fantastic guns in a great cartridge. As for the Redhawk, don't break a hammer link unless you have a spare. If you DO have a spare, don't lose that tiny little pin I love my Redhawks too and thought they were indestructible but I can break an anvil so I shouldn't have been surprised when that little hook broke.

    Dan
    You sound like a purty goot gunsmith, to me.

    To be able to repair your guns is advantageous, for sure.

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  10. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    Indeed....I don't enjoy it at all really. But "IF", and that's a big "IF", I can hit that furry pointy toothed critter with it, he/she won't like it either!.....lol.
    I don't mind shooting my 429 bear load. Of course, I handload it, and can choose a load that doesn't cause me pain.

    Shucky, Gee, most Anybody can HL a 429, with a Lee Loader, so no need to depend on FLs that are a pain to shoot. (Which they may not be, less'n you use those Mighty loads like you describe. ) Besides, they are soooo spendy.

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

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