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Thread: help training a young dog

  1. #1
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    Default help training a young dog

    First I am not a dog trainer and I need help with a female 15 months old. She is very gentle and stubborn did I mention stubborn. She will not come when called and just keeps running away as fast as she can. I have tried treats and long lines and teaching with our other dog who does come when called. So here it is. 1. Is she to old to train, 2. will an e-collar work with her, will I need to keep the e-collar or can eventually train her to come when called and leave the e-collar off entirely. Really been trying all of her life and nothing works. Thanks

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    Wat kind of dog and what is your goal with her?
    1. No
    2. Yes

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dexter Grayson View Post
    Wat kind of dog and what is your goal with her?
    1. No
    2. Yes
    1 yellow lab
    2 where ever and when ever i call she comes right now.

  4. #4

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    So many other questions to ask. I feel it may be your mechanics on the use of the long line. Timing on the command, timing of corrections, knowing when to give the command, knowing when a correction is warranted. When I first start I let them go out in front. Then I turn 180 going opposite direction saying my HERE command. I say HERE with a tug on the long line til they are coming towards me. I take up the rope and typically they shoot past me again out front. Then I just turn 180 again and repeat. After several reps they realize that being out front is not a good place to be. Eventually they just walk beside you. I correct for leading(being out front) and for lagging(being behind not catching up to me). When they are beside me verbal praise. It is a good thing to practice cause you are working on recall command as well as teaching them to walk at your side on a leash without pulling. I do use a pinch collar while doing this. It may take a week of this or more.
    No shes not too old. Ecollar training comes later after commands have been properly taught using a long line.
    If she truly is stubborn then go find your calm hat and put it on. You are due lots of repetition for things to sink in. You have got to rewire her head on how things need to be done. Do not set yourself up for failure. She is to no longer be able to go without a form of correction. For now that is a long line. Eventually the ecollar. And yes eventually she will listen and respond without any of this but that may be a month or more from now depending on how much you work with this. Consistency is key. Remember obedience isnÂ’t just a drill it is a lifetime.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wetland Retrievers View Post
    So many other questions to ask. I feel it may be your mechanics on the use of the long line. Timing on the command, timing of corrections, knowing when to give the command, knowing when a correction is warranted. When I first start I let them go out in front. Then I turn 180 going opposite direction saying my HERE command. I say HERE with a tug on the long line til they are coming towards me. I take up the rope and typically they shoot past me again out front. Then I just turn 180 again and repeat. After several reps they realize that being out front is not a good place to be. Eventually they just walk beside you. I correct for leading(being out front) and for lagging(being behind not catching up to me). When they are beside me verbal praise. It is a good thing to practice cause you are working on recall command as well as teaching them to walk at your side on a leash without pulling. I do use a pinch collar while doing this. It may take a week of this or more.
    No shes not too old. Ecollar training comes later after commands have been properly taught using a long line.
    If she truly is stubborn then go find your calm hat and put it on. You are due lots of repetition for things to sink in. You have got to rewire her head on how things need to be done. Do not set yourself up for failure. She is to no longer be able to go without a form of correction. For now that is a long line. Eventually the ecollar. And yes eventually she will listen and respond without any of this but that may be a month or more from now depending on how much you work with this. Consistency is key. Remember obedience isnÂ’t just a drill it is a lifetime.

    ​From your description of the correct use of the long line I have not been doing it right. Glad to know she is not to old to train. Searching for my calm hat might even need a new one. Thanks for the advise.

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    Have you made any progress?

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    I have been working with a 14 month old Deutsch Kurzhaar that has a mind of her own. She is a litter mate to one that I own. Mine will obey all basic voice commands...Sit , stay, come, heel and woa. She is pointing live birds and honoring point. Her litter mate knew nothing when she came to me. I have had her for a week and she now has sit, stay and come figured out. I had no choice but to use a long lead rope along with the word "come" and "now". Others that I hunt with use "Here" so I choose something different for my dogs or the few that I still train. "Come" is the basic command and she obeys it 90% of the time. "Now' is a warning command that means either you get to me right now or I use the collar. I always start with come first and if she gets side tracked on the way back then she here's now in a stern voice. My two personal bird dogs obey the collar everytime in just the vibrate mode but this new dog needs a little jolt every now and then that tells her she is not out of my reach. At first come meant nothing to her and I had to reel her in with the rope while saying come. Then when I had her reeled all the way in I buttered her up "saying good girl come". Last night in a 15 minute period of time she obeyed the come command 9 times out of 10 without the rope. She got met with praise each time that she responded and came to me. The one time she got side tracked and ignored me she got a buzz from the collar on a light setting(3 out of 10 levels) and she spun on a dime and came to me and got her usual praise.

    The tendency for most is to just expect the dog to come immediately and then get frustrated when the dog does not come and because it is not on a rope they are completely out of control and the dog goes into the give an inch take a mile mode. I have seen guys chase their dog down and scold it for not coming when it had no idea what come even meant. I have watched people get mad and use hostile tones in their voice when their dog is not responding and then when it finally does they hard hand it for not responding right away. To the dog they are hard handing it for coming at all. It's like why should I come to you if you are just going to cuff me upside the head.

    Go very light on discipline and high on praise but put yourself in position where you are always in control. Rope first with commands and then the collar!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by elmerkeithclone View Post

    The tendency for most is to just expect the dog to come immediately and then get frustrated when the dog does not come and because it is not on a rope they are completely out of control and the dog goes into the give an inch take a mile mode. I have seen guys chase their dog down and scold it for not coming when it had no idea what come even meant. I have watched people get mad and use hostile tones in their voice when their dog is not responding and then when it finally does they hard hand it for not responding right away. To the dog they are hard handing it for coming at all. It's like why should I come to you if you are just going to cuff me upside the head.
    Yeah, this is the worst. Smacking your dog when it finally comes is a real good way to have it not come at all after awhile. Just like teaching a dog to come but having to say it 10 times before they do. That ends up teaching them that the first three "comes" pretty much means nothing, the fourth through sixth or seventh, might have them headed your way, and then by the tenth "come" they might be at your side. Consistency is key. Once the dog learns what come means then it's said ONE time. If they don't come right then and there it's a yank on the rope or buzz on the collar. I never had the need to use a shock collar, but I can sure see how it would be very well worth it.
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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