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Thread: Selecting a pup from a litter

  1. #21
    Member 2jumpersplease's Avatar
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    Here’s a little different perspective. Picking a litter and a breeder are where you will have some information. If you can meet the parents or related dogs (and for a hunting dog hunt with them) then you will get an awful lot of knowledge. Find a breeder that you trust and write down what’s important to you and give that to the breeder then trust them to do the picking. They know the breed and they will be with the pups for a couple of months as opposed to a few minutes. I find that everyone wants the best dog and the pick of the litter but their definition of best is not the same. I would put the energy into picking a breeder and/or a litter and communicating what you want to the breeder. After that, just consistently spend time working with your dog and you’ll be surprised how they start to fit in to their new pack and try to figure out how to please you.


    -Tom

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    Member Daveintheburbs's Avatar
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    Over the years I have seen and tried to use most of the tips folks are offering. In the end the best advice I have read was from the famous trainer Rich Wolters. He said to reach into the pile of pups, grab one, turn turn it over to see if it had the desired plumbing. If so, that's your dog.

  3. #23
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2jumpersplease View Post
    Here’s a little different perspective. Picking a litter and a breeder are where you will have some information. If you can meet the parents or related dogs (and for a hunting dog hunt with them) then you will get an awful lot of knowledge. Find a breeder that you trust and write down what’s important to you and give that to the breeder then trust them to do the picking. They know the breed and they will be with the pups for a couple of months as opposed to a few minutes. I find that everyone wants the best dog and the pick of the litter but their definition of best is not the same. I would put the energy into picking a breeder and/or a litter and communicating what you want to the breeder. After that, just consistently spend time working with your dog and you’ll be surprised how they start to fit in to their new pack and try to figure out how to please you.


    -Tom
    Thanks. Yeah, we’ve already had quite a few such discussions with the breeder, and she assures us that she can help us pick the right dog. Appreciate the feedback.

  4. #24
    Member 2jumpersplease's Avatar
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    That’s perfect. Communicating what you want to a breeder that cares is about as good as you can do. Very cool.

  5. #25
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    Brian it sounds like you have a good breeder and litter already. I would not discount that the Goldendoodle won't hunt birds or rabbits. A little training early might pay off when you do get a chance to bird hunt. Good luck with the pup!!

  6. #26
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    Thanks. Yeah, we’ve already had quite a few such discussions with the breeder, and she assures us that she can help us pick the right dog.
    "Help" you yes, but make sure it's the one that really grabs you, and the rest of your family's interest, for whatever reason. Weather it be perceived temperament, looks, or just plain ol' "got a feeling" about this one. Don't forget, sometimes the runt of the litter can be the best one of the bunch.

    I remember when I "stole" my chessie. For some reason she was the last one to go, and I wondered about that....was she the runt? But after I got down on the floor and she ran up to me straight away with a little ball in her mouth, let me have it, and I tossed it and she brought it back to me, although I didn't have to make a choice, I knew she was the one. I'll never know if she was the runt but she ended up being around 95 lbs. of muscle so I doubt it. But she did end up being the best bird dog I ever had, besides being my best friend for many years. She did however come from champion stock on both sides as well. What a prize she was! I said I "stole" her, because at the time I was a little low on cash so they let me have her for less than they were asking, which was real cheap to start with. Boy times sure have changed when it comes to prices for these dogs!

    Good luck Brian, I'm sure you're in for a fun time with the family! Only real hard part is saying goodbye....especially when they grow up with your kids. They do have a tendency to get in under your skin and bury into your heart....sometimes in a real big way. So be prepared!
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  7. #27
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    If youre looking for a specific characteristic in a dog youre much better off adopting an adult dog then you get what you see. If you buy a puppy you have no guarantwe of health or behavior. This has been confirmed to me by someone who has placed top ten in the national sheepdog finals and somebody who has wonit several times

    Sent from my LML211BL using Tapatalk

  8. #28

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    Fun times Brian! It sounds like you're in a good position with a breeder you trust. Honestly, having picked my own pup a few times, helped raise a few litters, and had breeders pick my dog for me I think the breeder picking is the most likely way to get the right fit for your needs assuming you have good communication about those needs. If you trust your breeder and tell her about your family and plans/needs for the dog, I'd let her choose your pup for you.

  9. #29
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    I let the dog pick me. Whoever is the most interested in me usually ends up being the one I take home.

    My logic here is if they are interested in me from that age, it will make training them easier since they have an extreme drive to please and be around "master".


    So far it has worked out well for me, but for me train-ability is important, whereas for others its not so much.

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Daveintheburbs View Post
    Over the years I have seen and tried to use most of the tips folks are offering. In the end the best advice I have read was from the famous trainer Rich Wolters. He said to reach into the pile of pups, grab one, turn turn it over to see if it had the desired plumbing. If so, that's your dog.
    I am a big fan of Richard A Wolters (city dog, water dog gun dog) and use his method for selecting the temperment of a dog, based on 5 simple tests where the pup is rated 1 to 5, with 1 being a dog that is soo aggressive it is only good for protecting a junk yard and 5 being a dog that is so timid as to pee when the doorbell rings.
    The book explaning the tests (which take about 5 minutes per pup) I believe is out of print but a used appears to be available cheap at https://www.amazon.com/City-Dog-Rich.../dp/0876901488

  11. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnnycake View Post
    If you trust your breeder and tell her about your family and plans/needs for the dog, I'd let her choose your pup for you.
    Well, trust or not, people can't see the future, so as I said above, I would listen to, and let the breeder "help" me to possibly make my decision, but for a potential investment in something for a possible 10 to 15-16+ year haul, in the end, I'd go with what I saw that pleased me the most....regardless. Not to say some dogs aren't smarter than others, but depending on the training, I really believe that many dogs would fill what Brian and his family are looking for in their dog, especially in the breed he's decided on. I think about the people I've known that have come home with some mutt they got from kids sitting out in front of the grocery store, that has made them happy in every way, and just love to death. Now, trying to pick the possible best bird dog out of the bunch "may" be a different story, but overall breeding plays a big part in that. Again, so very much depends on the training as to how any dog turns out. The more time you put into them, the better they'll turn out to be what you want.

    Oh and by the way, Daveintheburbs and BEARBOB, I too have been a big fan of Wolters for many years. I had proof that what that man says carries much weight. Sometimes it is indeed as simple as picking a male or female....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  12. #32
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Meet Eli (named after the Wrangell St. Elias Mountains).


  13. #33
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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  14. #34
    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    S/he looks just like you, Brian! Congrats!!
    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    Meet Eli (named after the Wrangell St. Elias Mountains).

    ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
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  15. #35
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by iofthetaiga View Post
    S/he looks just like you, Brian! Congrats!!
    He. Wife was leaning towards a big male, so that helped narrow things down. This guy seemed mellow and sociable, came right up to my boys and us, and was overall super pleasant. Thought we wanted a really curly one, but he seemed like a handful and the two wavy males seemed more what we were looking for. Almost identical in temperament and appearance, but one was more into my kids and was also a fair bit larger. I’m sure we could have blindly picked one from the pile and been happy, but we’re feeling good about this one.

  16. #36

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    Looks like a fun pup! Congrats

  17. #37
    Member Daveintheburbs's Avatar
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    Nice looking pup Brian! The trainer several of us mentioned, Richard Wolters, wrote a classic training book that is well worth a look. Family Dog is available through the Anchorage library system. Good luck!

  18. #38
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daveintheburbs View Post
    Nice looking pup Brian! The trainer several of us mentioned, Richard Wolters, wrote a classic training book that is well worth a look. Family Dog is available through the Anchorage library system. Good luck!
    Yeah, I picked up that book a month ago based on the numerous recommendations here. I've got some reading to do!

  19. #39
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    Yeah, I picked up that book a month ago based on the numerous recommendations here. I've got some reading to do!
    Just remember Brain, it's all about consistency and NOT letting the dog train you....and they will try! Make sure the rest of the family trains like you do as well, as to not confuse the pup with conflicting methods. Good luck....I'm sure it will be a great dog for the family.
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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