Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: Archery Caribou

  1. #1

    Default Archery Caribou

    For all the bow hunters who have hunted caribou along the Haul Rd/Dalton HWY. I have questions.

    I am thinking to head up next fall-August.
    My background is mainly bow hunting Whitetails. I have shot a lot of WT with my bow, both tree stand and spot and stalk. Also a couple black bears.

    My caribou experience is limited to only a couple rifle shot animals. Now I want to try my archery skills on them.

    Questions are:
    typical range that you can honestly get into for shot
    what weight broadhead guys are using
    typical cover one can anticipate, (pictures would be great).

    I am sure I will come up with more questions as they arise.

    Thanks for any input, Kathleen

  2. #2
    Member Daveinthebush's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Valdez, Alaska
    Posts
    5,460

    Default

    From my experience the caribou have a 70 yard comfort zone. If you can hit that far great. If not, don't worry. There is a lot of area up there. It might be flat to gently rolling hills. Some stream beds, some willows, rocks and the pipe line to hide behind. If you have the bow setup for whitetails, you should be fine poundage wise. I would use a cut-on-impact broadhead. (I hate mechanicals) The groups used to roam around quite a bit so it is possible to get in front of them and wait. I have seen one team try a decoy but I don't know if they were successful. It was a husband and wife team. Attachment 97210This is up top above Galbrith Lake on a mountain. Attachment 97211This shot shows how quick it goes frm mountain to flat. But don't let "flat" fool you. The tussocks can be a real pain in the butt to walk on.

    Hillary moved to NY and I moved out.


  3. #3
    Member Daveinthebush's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Valdez, Alaska
    Posts
    5,460

    Default

    Attachment 97212
    This kid shot this one while we were there. He ran after it, the caribou got confused and came back to see what was chasing him and the kid shot it.

    Hillary moved to NY and I moved out.


  4. #4
    Member Daveinthebush's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Valdez, Alaska
    Posts
    5,460

    Default


    The first one had his head hid in a depression on the Sag. I walked right across the gravel bed to 70 yards and double lunged him. He then dove into the Sag. and I had to wait for him to hit a sand bar to drag him out. The second, was shading himself under the pipeline and I stalked him to 40 yards.

    Hillary moved to NY and I moved out.


  5. #5

    Default

    Daveinthebush, thanks for the reply and Very nice caribou. I know I have to just get up there and get boots on the ground to learn a lot. I will. But to get a little insight from others is helpful too.
    I prefer fixed heads vs mechanicals too, especially when on the ground. Those mechanicals will open if they hit any kind of brush or twig.
    I have been using 100 gr, is this adequate? My bow is set at 64# for the draw weight. I am confident that is adequate.

    The more I think about this hunting the more excited I get!

  6. #6
    Member Daveinthebush's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Valdez, Alaska
    Posts
    5,460

    Default

    If your shooting 100 grain heads at 64 pounds assuming your arrows are spined correctly for the weight, you should be fine. The search engine here will be helpful too. Just type in "haul road" or something along that line and there should be lots of other posts that will help you. You might read 20-30 but gleam that one important thing from the next post that helps you out. It also used to be, that if someone headed up, they'd post it on line. It's nice to have someone to keep and eye out for you if your up there. You might meet some interesting characters up there. In 2011 I met the original people that started the Alaska Mile Post. She, her husband died that year, was doing one last trip up the road for the new owners of the Mile Post. Then I met a kid (20ish) that had hiked all the way from Mexico City heading to Deadhorse. If I don't win any draw hunts I may be up there myself.

    Hillary moved to NY and I moved out.


  7. #7

    Default

    Sounds good, thanks Dave. I am thinking August. Not sure what week, although I might just make it a couple week adventure or two different trips. I live in Cordova, so not too tough for me to get there. Already saving up vacation time.
    If you don't get a draw, maybe we can make it up the same week.

  8. #8
    Air Charter / Transporter
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    213

    Default

    ernurse,
    I shoot 64#'s and 100 grain heads. That's very effective, you should have no issues at all.
    Adak Caribou Hunts
    dave@svahunts.com
    1(907)399-1775
    http://www.adakcaribouhunts.com/

  9. #9

    Default

    Thanks Itsryd

  10. #10
    Member Daveinthebush's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Valdez, Alaska
    Posts
    5,460

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ernurse View Post
    Sounds good, thanks Dave. I am thinking August. Not sure what week, although I might just make it a couple week adventure or two different trips. I live in Cordova, so not too tough for me to get there. Already saving up vacation time.
    If you don't get a draw, maybe we can make it up the same week.
    I will keep you posted. It has been a couple years since I have been up there. The beauty of the place is worth the trip alone.

    Hillary moved to NY and I moved out.


  11. #11
    Member Roger45's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    1,044

    Default

    I've shot a few using 100 grain Muzzy trocar at 58# with my Mathews and usually have clean pass through. Wind and bugs will be a bigger issue than draw weight IMHO. Practice shooting in the wind, and in Cordova that shouldn't be a problem ;-) The slope is massive, so one issue I see is folks make a plan to go to one spot (like Galbraith Lake) and stay even if there are no 'bou, so be flexible in your plans and plan on driving to where they are. There is a lot of open ground, so be prepared to being creative in finding cover for stalking as 'bou have great eye sight. Very enjoyable hunt for me either solo or with a friend. Have a CB in your rig so you can talk to truckers (it's their road) to make it safe for passing or them passing you.
    "...and then Jack chopped down the beanstock, adding murder and ecological vandalism to the theft, enticement and vandalism charges already mentioned, but he got away with it and lived happily ever after without so much as a guilty twinge about what he had done. Which proves that you can be excused just about anything if you're a hero, because no one asks the inconvenient questions." Terry Pratchett's The Hogfather

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    2,448

    Default

    I have got caribou to come to me by laying low and waving a handkerchief. They're not too smart, and very curious.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

  13. #13

    Default

    I like the flagging trick. I have done that wit ducks quite effectively. I will have to try that!

  14. #14
    New member
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Posts
    1

    Default

    We’ve been coming up visiting a buddy in Fairbanks the past couple yrs and last year was our first experience on the haul rd. Bit of advice from last year we went late Aug. and found out quickly either find the caribou where terrain will allow for a stalk or use the other hunters to your advantage glass them from a distance and narrow down where they will spook the animals and set up for an ambush and like the others said flagging works well just remember your wind like whitetail, hope to see ya up there we’re heading back for sure.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  15. #15

    Default

    Thank you for the advice. Yep, definitely planning to go up. I am getting excited. i haven't been bow hunting in a few years. Will practice all summer. But I do have a long summer of halibut, ling cod, salmon fishing, shrimping, hiking, camping. Maybe I will bow hunt for a spring bear rather than gun, that will get things rolling for me.

    I do like the flagging idea too. Someone else mentioned it and I am definitely going to try it.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •