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Thread: How long do you hang your meat

  1. #21
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gokorn1 View Post
    I've hung several animals from over a week to butchering the next day, Haven't noticed a difference. It is easier if you butcher before a thick crust forms on the meat.
    It may be easier, but that crust is what helps protect the meat while aging, especially in warmer weather. People have been hanging meat to age for eons of time. Hard to believe all of them have been wrong in doing so....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  2. #22
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    I always hang my meat, I always intend to have my meat hang longer than it ends up hanging because of the realities of life. This year I had from 2 to 6 days of hanging time on blacktail, there is a difference between the meat 2 days and the 6 days...of course these were from different animals so there is that variable. I've only dabbled in wet aging and have never gone anywhere close to the 21 days that the Meateater article I linked to earlier said provided the best results. I have two pieces of backstrap in the fridge that were dry aged for the previously mentioned 2 to 6 days that I am going to now wet age 14 and 21 days, I didn't mark which meat was which when I packaged them, but I will take one half of each for the first sample at 14 days then the rest at 21 days. I might try the 28 days later, but dry aging for 6 days and wet aging for 28 days might be a bit much.
    I would rather have questions that can't be answered than answers that can't be questioned. Physicist ― Richard Feynman


  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    It may be easier, but that crust is what helps protect the meat while aging, especially in warmer weather. People have been hanging meat to age for eons of time. Hard to believe all of them have been wrong in doing so....
    Yup totally agree with the crust and not saying its wrong. Im just saying its easier if someone isnt worried about hanging it for long.

  4. #24
    Member sisusuomi's Avatar
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    We hang the quarters, ribs and pelvis 3-5 days with fans moving air around them 24-7. We also spray with the citrus-water mix. Id never process my kill unless it went into and out of rigamortis


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patsfan54 View Post
    I always hang my meat, I always intend to have my meat hang longer than it ends up hanging because of the realities of life. This year I had from 2 to 6 days of hanging time on blacktail, there is a difference between the meat 2 days and the 6 days...of course these were from different animals so there is that variable. I've only dabbled in wet aging and have never gone anywhere close to the 21 days that the Meateater article I linked to earlier said provided the best results. I have two pieces of backstrap in the fridge that were dry aged for the previously mentioned 2 to 6 days that I am going to now wet age 14 and 21 days, I didn't mark which meat was which when I packaged them, but I will take one half of each for the first sample at 14 days then the rest at 21 days. I might try the 28 days later, but dry aging for 6 days and wet aging for 28 days might be a bit much.
    So I did my wet aging experiment on my previously dry aged meat. I ended up going 19 and 25 days since life had different plans that I did. The two pieces of backstrap wet aged 19 days were phenomenal, the one that was a little less tender and aged only a few days was now more tender than before the other was one of the most tender pieces of meat I've ever had. The flavor of both was intensified in a very good way. I removed all of the pieces from the vac bags and dabbed them dry before resealing in fresh bags at 7 days again at 19 days on the last pieces. There was a considerable amount of blood/juice at 7 days and just a little at 19. The pieces of backstrap that went 25 days weren't appreciably better than those that went 19, I wish I had been able to stick to my original timeline but wasn't disappointed at all by either and will throw another, bigger piece into the fridge to wet age and hopefully get the 14 days next time. The meat takes on a much darker color than what most people would expect from "fresh" meat but the smell was never off, and that is according to my wife who can smell things that are miles away and knows what off meat smells like.
    I would rather have questions that can't be answered than answers that can't be questioned. Physicist ― Richard Feynman


  6. #26
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    In a perfect world, around 38 to 40 degrees at night, I try to hang meat, moose or caribou, for at east 12 days with air on it. I've tried cutting off a steak from the front quarter on the day it's hung, a week later and a week after that. I notice a definite difference in tenderness from the first to last sample. Trimming is time consuming, but when it's got a nice hard crust over the entire quarter a razor sharp round edged blade can slide just under the surface. You end up with nice clean quarters to cut up. I have room to do this with a set up where I can use an electric hoist to raise and lower the quarter while I work on it, so it's easier to do it this way and it works for me.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Strahan View Post
    There's also a risk of processing / freezing it too soon. If the meat freezes before it goes completely through rigor mortis, you can get cold shortening, where the muscle tissues contract. The result is tougher meat, and the cell walls start to rupture.... when you cook it you lose a lot of moisture and flavor.
    THAT'S exactly what happened too my buffalo back in 05. I was so excited too finally get the tag and knock a bull down. I was by myself and exhausted by the time I had everything packed up, loaded in the bed of my truck, and headed for a shower back at my cabin at the Silver Fox. It was a Saturday afternoon and 12* when I killed it. The temp dropped to 0* that night. Next morning the meat was already really firm. I had nowhere to take it, everything was closed. So I hauled azz home to Wasilla and hung it up, if I recall it was in the low 40's outside. It barely drained any blood for 2 days. It smelled and seemed normal during the processing and packaging. But when it was cooked, it was definitely tougher and drier. I was pretty bummed to say the least..
    HUUUUGE lesson learned on that one..

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