Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Pre-emptive king closure for Susitna kings....

  1. #1
    Member fishNphysician's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Aberdeen WA
    Posts
    4,750

    Default Pre-emptive king closure for Susitna kings....

    .... announced this morning by ADFG
    "Let every angler who loves to fish think what it would mean to him to find the fish were gone." Zane Grey
    http://www.piscatorialpursuits.com/uploads/UP12710.jpg
    The KeenEye MD

  2. #2
    Member fishNphysician's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Aberdeen WA
    Posts
    4,750
    "Let every angler who loves to fish think what it would mean to him to find the fish were gone." Zane Grey
    http://www.piscatorialpursuits.com/uploads/UP12710.jpg
    The KeenEye MD

  3. #3
    Member ysr_racer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Happily in So Cal.
    Posts
    664

    Default

    Something has to be done, hopefully this is it.
    brad g.
    So Cal, USA
    Visit my Sporting Clays website
    http://www.ysr-racer.com

  4. #4
    Member hogfamily's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Anchorage Suburbanites, part time Willowbillies, Appleseeds, and Weekend Warrior Turquoise Miners!
    Posts
    1,459

    Default

    It should be 100% closed to all groups.
    “Move that fat ass Henry!”
    “Don’t swing your balls or you’ll swamp the boat!"

  5. #5
    Member fishNphysician's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Aberdeen WA
    Posts
    4,750

    Default

    "Let every angler who loves to fish think what it would mean to him to find the fish were gone."

    Now let it sink in some more.

    It's a truly sad state of affairs what has happened to the Susitna kings.... esp what has transpired in the past decade.

    But maybe a bit of historical perspective will help us better understand how to get out the mess we've made.

    The 1940's were notable for obscene overfishing and the ensuing precipitous slide of Cook Inlet salmon stocks. Thru the 50's and 60's, runs to Cook Inlet were horribly depressed. Upon taking the reins of fish management for the fledgling State in 1959, Andy Anderson the first Commissioner of the newly formed ADF&G had this to say to his biologists...

    “Gentlemen, the governor has instructed me to return the salmon runs to their former abundance regardless of the pain that is inflicted on the people. I’m charging each one of you to make sure every stream in your district is filled to the maximum spawning capability. Now, if you allow an over-escapement, depriving the fishermen of their livelihood, you can expect to be criticized. But on a personal level, gentlemen, I want you to understand that if you allow an under-escapement, you can expect to be fired.

    As the runs were re-built during the 70's, folks would find themselves chomping at the bit in eager anticipation of king fisheries re-opening throughout the region. Up north, I remember seeing the HUGE fire-engine red kings pile up in the deep trestle hole at Montana Creek for the first time as a 13 yr old. By the late 70's the road-accessible Eastside Susitna tribs were deemed healthy enough to allow king fishing. I had just finished my sophomore year at Chugiak High the summer of 1979 when they first opened to MUCH fanfare.

    And the bank fishing on those first weekend openers was phenomenal! And it just seemed to get better every year thru the 80's. I remember attending the Sport Show in Anchorage when former Sportfish Director Kevin Delaney gave a talk about the Susitna system being the premier producer of Cook Inlet kings, and how it was the most untapped/under-utilized resource for the sportfishing community. The take home message? Yes, the Kenai held the limelight, but let's not forget about the overwhelmingly greater potential of the Big Su to produce lots of BIG kings

    Then came the heydays. More and more of the Su tribs opened up and became discovered. We watched the rise of the fledgling guide fleet. We experienced the allure and excitement of the annual MatSu King Derby... where a contender typically had to weigh in the 50-60's to take the annual prize. MatSu king fever was alive and well.

    Yes, there were speed bumps along the way with occasional hiccups in the returns, but on the whole the system remained productive. ALL WAS GOOD.... until it wasn't.

    Chinks were starting to show in the Susitna's armor. By the late 2000's we started regularly seeing EO restrictions to the Little Su, Deshka, and the other Susitna tribs on an in-season basis. No bait... limited days... limited retention... C&R only... and finally closures. These IN-SEASON restrictions would soon become the EXPECTATION for Northern Cook Inlet king anglers from 2010 forward.

    So here we sit in 2019.... barely cracking the New Year... and we've got a PRE-SEASON closure!

    Not saying this EO isn't justified. It most certainly is. But it's REALLY tough to see the fish runs that were judiciously rebuilt in the 70's eventually decimated by poor management in the span of just 4 decades since fisheries on them first re-opened. Yeah... we suck. WE SUCK BAD!
    "Let every angler who loves to fish think what it would mean to him to find the fish were gone." Zane Grey
    http://www.piscatorialpursuits.com/uploads/UP12710.jpg
    The KeenEye MD

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    2,331

    Default

    And who can forget the heydays of the 80's on the Kasilof. Sure they were mostly hatchery Kings, but there were a lot of them.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

  7. #7

    Default

    Finally Our Fish and Game department is on the right track All King Salmon fishing in the Cook inlet should be closed.... I remember the 1970 and how surprising it was to have KING SALMON fishing closed in the Susitna Salmon streams it was almost 10 years before it was restored but at that time there were few Hatchery. The Pacific north west has gone through the same over fishing and closers of King Salmon, but there King Salmon returns are Great today better King Salmon fishing there than in ALASKA how sad in my Eyes things can change and should with our great King Salmon returns in Ship Creek is better fishing than the Famous Keni River King Salmon.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Gakona Ak
    Posts
    1,715

    Talking

    Well......Just to make you feel better the Gulkana has had 2 banner years in a row and with any luck this June will be great again! Now 2017 and 2018 wee not like back in the day-1990's but very few fishermen and lots of hook ups!

    We are booking Raft Rentals as we speak!

    Walt
    http://www.gulkanaraftrental.com
    Attached Images Attached Images

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    42

    Default

    Just curious, are those blush kings good eating? Have never kept one due to the unknown. Just curious as to everyone's opinion.

  10. #10
    Member willphish4food's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Willow, AK
    Posts
    3,583

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Munster View Post
    Just curious, are those blush kings good eating? Have never kept one due to the unknown. Just curious as to everyone's opinion.
    It depends where they are caught. Copper drainage kings have a very high fat content due to the distance they must travel, and though blushed, may still have a lot of fat and firm flesh. I've eaten fairly blushed kings from the Copper that were far better than a dime bright Susitna drainage fish. Other drainages with much shorter travel times in fresh water, a blushed fish may be in much poorer condition for eating. Another factor that affects eating quality is water temperature. Warm water will soften the flesh very quickly. There is no problem with that on the Gulkana! The level of blush is important, too, and whether it is a male or female fish. Hens soften up and turn pale more quickly than males. Also, salmon get more red after they have been out of the water for a little while. A fish can have a very faint tint of pink when its killed, and look like a bad suburn case an hour later.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •