Results 1 to 16 of 16

Thread: Training books/resources?

  1. #1
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    13,830

    Default Training books/resources?

    Not specifically a gundog-related question - more focused on a family dog.

    My family is getting our first dog this spring, and being as I'm completely new to owning a dog, I want to be as prepared as possible regarding training a dog correctly. I don't expect to use the dog for hunting, as I do very little wingshooting and I wouldn't want to train the dog only to deprive it of the opportunity to hunt. Rather, we just want a well-trained dog that will obey voice commands both in the house and in the mountains.

    Any suggestions of good books to read in preparation for training a puppy? Other resources?

    Thanks!

  2. #2

    Default

    gun dog or water dog by waters. great stuff for day to day commands sit/heel/come etc
    and you will be all set when you decide to have a bird dog

  3. #3

    Default

    Thanks for the recommendation bhday!
    I'm planning on getting a puppy next summer and want to up my game as a canine owner. I've always had well mannered pets but I want to be able to have well trained dogs if you know what I mean.

    Sent from my Pixel using Tapatalk

  4. #4
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
    Posts
    11,475

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    Not specifically a gundog-related question - more focused on a family dog.

    My family is getting our first dog this spring, and being as I'm completely new to owning a dog, I want to be as prepared as possible regarding training a dog correctly. I don't expect to use the dog for hunting, as I do very little wingshooting and I wouldn't want to train the dog only to deprive it of the opportunity to hunt. Rather, we just want a well-trained dog that will obey voice commands both in the house and in the mountains.

    Any suggestions of good books to read in preparation for training a puppy? Other resources?

    Thanks!
    For what you want Brain, "Family Dog" by Richard Wolters would be a good one: https://www.amazon.com/s/?ie=UTF8&ke...l_70mskjdj0m_e
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  5. #5
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    13,830

    Default

    These books look great. Thanks, gentlemen!

  6. #6

    Default

    I would also look into taking a puppy obedience class. There are a bunch around town usually. When training a dog for any purpose, consistency is key. Have fun with the pup, but try to set clear boundaries on certain behaviors from day 1.

  7. #7

    Default

    Check out the Leerburg website. There are many free basic obedience training videos that are good.

  8. #8

    Default

    Well, just my personal opinion. If I wanted to buy another dog and I was primarily looking for a family oriented, obedient, well-mannered dog in the house that might occasionally go hunting, I would buy another lab. That's just me. One my best dogs I ever owned was a chocolate lab. She died about 10 years ago. They are easy to train, well behaved, don't shed a lot, great with the kids, and a great companion outdoors. And they can help you retrieve birds if you are so inclined. Now I own a beagle and she's great for hunting rabbits, but they are not the best house dogs if you ask me. In fact we keep her outside a lot. But I do more rabbit hunting than I do duck hunting so that was the primary reason why I chose a beagle. A friend of mine has a couple german shorthaired pointers and they are good all around hunting dogs and they play well with kids but they are very high energy and if you live in the city and don't have a way to get them regular exercise I wouldn't recommend them. It's not good for the dogs if they can't have an outlet to release all that energy. If I was looking for a good guard dog I would get a german shepherd. I've had lots of friends that have owned them over they years and they are extremely loyal to their families, good with kids, and they would guard you with their life.

    As far as training goes, it's not rocket science. Just pick up some books on obedience training at the library. The basic commands are all you really need. Come, sit, stay, heel, etc.

    On another note, I just read an article recently in my American Hunter magazine that talked about using dogs for predator hunting, specifically coyotes. It was interesting. I've never heard of this before. The reason why I mention it, is because the breed the guy chose for this type of hunting was border collies. I've known a few friends over the years that owned border collies. One of them goes by the name of carnivore on here. I believe he owns or used to own some border collies. Anyhow, I don't know much about them, but I've heard they make great companions, especially for long hikes in the mountains, and possibly you could use them for predator hunting. I'm not really sure exactly what role they serve in the predator hunting scenario. I think they just distract the coyote and give you a better opportunity to make a shot, but check out the article if you can it was an interesting read. Good luck picking a new member of your family.

  9. #9
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
    Posts
    11,475

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bushwhack Jack View Post

    On another note, I just read an article recently in my American Hunter magazine that talked about using dogs for predator hunting, specifically coyotes. It was interesting. I've never heard of this before. The reason why I mention it, is because the breed the guy chose for this type of hunting was border collies. I've known a few friends over the years that owned border collies. One of them goes by the name of carnivore on here. I believe he owns or used to own some border collies. Anyhow, I don't know much about them, but I've heard they make great companions, especially for long hikes in the mountains, and possibly you could use them for predator hunting. I'm not really sure exactly what role they serve in the predator hunting scenario. I think they just distract the coyote and give you a better opportunity to make a shot, but check out the article if you can it was an interesting read. Good luck picking a new member of your family.
    When I first read this I thought of the border collie being used as a "tolling" dog. So I googled it. I found that although some of the collies actually do run down and kill yotes, I guess most are used to do just that....toll, or to either distract the yote long enough for a shot, or to bring it in closer. I found an article: https://www.americanhunter.org/artic...-you-want-one/

    By the way, my daughter just picked up a border collie / Australian Shepard mix. Now that's a smart dog. You wouldn't believe all the things she's already taught her at such a young age. I told her to look out or I would make a bird dog out of her.
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    Yep, thanks 4mer, that was the exact article I was talking about.

  11. #11
    Member akrstabout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    2,487

    Default

    What breed ya leaning towards? I still highly recommend the German Jagíd Terriers. Mine is 13yo now. Still acts like a puppy, just sleeps more and is goin a bit deaf. Great family dog, and great dog to take anywhere and do anything with. Canít remember if I had her on the boat that one time w yíall or not. Sheís found many a bears n fought them too. Bunnies are her second choice species. She adapted to me getting married- couldnít sleep on my bed next to shoulder no more hahahaha and then when Nathan showed up.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  12. #12
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    13,830

    Default

    Weíre getting a goldendoodle. Not a huge fan of their appearance, but three of our neighbors have them and they are awesome dogs. Iíd consider a lab if it were just up to me, but the lack of shedding is priority one for my wife, so Iím not going to argue that point. The more time I spend around the breed, the more I like them.

  13. #13
    Member akrstabout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    2,487

    Default

    Check out Giant schnauzers, friend has one and they are getting second. Super good natured and not as high strung as the golden doodles Iíve seen at clients houses. Same, hypoallergenic.

    Thatís awesome tho, dogs are great. Like others say, just be consistent and do anything possible w them. They adapt to anything. Break them into guns w a 22lr from a distance w someone holding them as u shoot. Then call them to u. Why mine is goin deaf hahahaha sheís been around a lot of gunfire and love it. She often runs to where the bullets are headed. Heck one black bear she found for was was still alive n took 16 shots w handguns- bear was jacked on adrenaline and not all shots connected- new shooter but he did great in a dangerous situation.

    I did do a puppy class. That was it. Never read a book. But my dogs breed is one of few still bred to hunt. Itís just natural for her and even tracking over a day old blood trail n finding the bear.

    I didnít know I was doin it till one day I snapped my fingers and pointed n she went to where I was pointing. Turns out I was always snapping my fingers n pointing to her kennel or my by side or whatever. Got to the point I could just snap n point to her kennel w no command n she go to it and go in.

    CHEERIOS are great dog treats for teaching!!! Another cool tip I had heard, bunny poop is like M&Mís, moose poop is like peanut M&MíS for dogs! Chocolate, onions, grapes, raisins and I think garlic all have high contents of whatever thatís in chocolate that dogs donít digest. It collects in their bodies and gives them lots of issues


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  14. #14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    For what you want Brain, "Family Dog" by Richard Wolters would be a good one: https://www.amazon.com/s/?ie=UTF8&ke...l_70mskjdj0m_e
    I own family dog, water dog (my favorite) and gun dog, all excellent, can't go wrong. When buying his book make sure it is his books and not based on his methods, which some books are.

    BEARBOB

  15. #15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    Weíre getting a goldendoodle. Not a huge fan of their appearance, but three of our neighbors have them and they are awesome dogs. Iíd consider a lab if it were just up to me, but the lack of shedding is priority one for my wife, so Iím not going to argue that point. The more time I spend around the breed, the more I like them.
    I totally get the appeal of the nonshedding--that is possibly the biggest reason I prefer the pudelpointer to any of the other versatile hunting breeds. Before deciding on a pudelpointer I was looking hard at labradoodles and goldendoodles, thinking I could turn one into a good bird dog. Then after some further research into their coats and talking with a lot of guys that used doodles for hunting, I wasn't really happy with what I saw so I turned to standard poodles from hunting lines. But, since I really enjoy upland and pointing dogs as much or more than waterfowl I was really glad to stumble into the pudelpointer.

    Not all pudelpointers are true non-shedding though, just like not every goldendoodle/labradoodle is nonshedding, so you really need to look at the pedigree and in particular get info on prior breedings between the two parents to see how the pups turned out. My pudelpointer only lightly sheds the shorter hair around the back of her ears/sides of her head, and even then that is only when you are scratching her lots. I'd try to convert you to the pudelpointers, but as you've mentioned you're not looking for or wanting to train a hunting dog, I can respect that. They are excellent family dogs, trail/boat/plane/camping companions though, but without regular opportunities to hunt birds or track blood/fur they aren't really "happy."

    Goldendoodles are usually very nice family dogs. My sister owns a large grooming business down in the L48 and she specializes in doodle mixes. According to her experience about 1/2 of the goldendoodles and labradoodles shed a noticeable amount, and 1 in 4 sheds about as much as a purebred lab or golden. Just something to keep in mind.

  16. #16

    Default

    One other thing you may or may not have thought about: pet insurance. My Ava is currently at the vet after emergency surgery to remove a small silicone kid's toy from her small intestines, and they had to cut out about 2' of her intestine due to the blockage. It'll be our first time submitting a claim but from people I know with the same coverage as mine I think we'll get most of the $5k vet bill refunded. We have Nationwide Pet Major Medical, $250 annual deductible and a $263 annual premium. Ava should recover just fine, but boy am I'm glad I got that policy last April!

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •