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Thread: I-did-a Ski or I did a Shoe.......anyone

  1. #1

    Default I-did-a Ski or I did a Shoe.......anyone

    Anyone here with experience reference the I did a ski or I did a shoe.......???

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    I am interested in the survival equipment required, and the theory/methodology of that equipment, not the actual event.

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    What elite athletes use for ultra marathon events might not be the best choice for survival situations. Often what they choose is based on what is as light as possible, vs. what is going to keep them alive during worst case situations. That said there is much to be said for taking such an approach which is often termed the alpine mountaineering approach. Take the absolute minimal gear so that you can travel quickly through hazardous terrain to avoid hazards vs. carrying so much gear that you're almost guaranteed to need it as you move so slowly you're begging to get caught in bad weather.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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    They have or had some interesting theories. That seem outside the box of standard winter survival thinking. Like using a huge plastic bag "INSIDE" your light weight sleeping bag, and another outside the bag. There by keeping the bag dry. Yes the person is soaking wet, but the bag stays dry. The person can dry off, but after a few days at sub-zero you may not get the bag dry, with out the plastic liner.

    This is the "TYPE" of thinking I want to shift to. At 72 y/o my long winter expeditions are done; However I still most days do 2 to 5 miles off trail, a kind'a recce information daily patrol, and the occasional night navigation refresher. Both subject to severe weather.

    So it would be rare to be more then 2.5 miles from the cabin. It is thick forest, so I can't trust the PLB to communicate. My fear is something like a compound fracture and having to crawl back, and needing to rest overnight. So I am wanting to rebuild my short range winter survival kit.......with no comfort items. Thinking use several chemical hand & toe warmers + my lightest (2.5 pound) sleeping bag + my one piece motorcycle rain suit. A kind'a suck it up buttercup.......but stay alive survival kit.

    But very open to ideas.

  5. #5

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    Sleeping bag liners to prevent bags body moisture from decreasing bag efficiency is not a bad ideal. I would say it is a lot less of an issue for a synthetic bag in a 2-4 day emergency situation. I would rely on staying cold if you are a 21 year old Marine, for old guys may not be a good ideal. I would dress in synthetic layers/wool and ventilate as needed. Use the same layers in the bag to stay warm. The things that you loose to frostbite are fingers, feet, nose, and ears. So a fur (sealskin/beaver hat, gloves, and foot gear) are would be the key to saving the small parts. Down booties are great and light! You need to test you com gear!!!!!! A Garmin In-reach/sat phone allows you have a real dialog with the rescue people, so they can bring/drop the proper supplies. I am not a fan of hand/foot warmers for survival situations lasting more than a few hours. Just use proper footgear/mittens.
    At your age death is just a fart away so go spend some money before you die and buy a nice Mountain Hardware climbing bibs and jacket you will be warm at -40. I got the Jacket last year it is sooooooo warm!!!
    DENNY

  6. #6

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    That is the opposite direction I want to go. A lot of bulky survival gear. That is "exactly" what I want to get away from. That is more or less the way I have been doing it for the last 49 years in the Alaska wilderness.


    Quote Originally Posted by boneguy View Post
    Sleeping bag liners to prevent bags body moisture from decreasing bag efficiency is not a bad ideal. I would say it is a lot less of an issue for a synthetic bag in a 2-4 day emergency situation. I would rely on staying cold if you are a 21 year old Marine, for old guys may not be a good ideal. I would dress in synthetic layers/wool and ventilate as needed. Use the same layers in the bag to stay warm. The things that you loose to frostbite are fingers, feet, nose, and ears. So a fur (sealskin/beaver hat, gloves, and foot gear) are would be the key to saving the small parts. Down booties are great and light! You need to test you com gear!!!!!! A Garmin In-reach/sat phone allows you have a real dialog with the rescue people, so they can bring/drop the proper supplies. I am not a fan of hand/foot warmers for survival situations lasting more than a few hours. Just use proper footgear/mittens.
    At your age death is just a fart away so go spend some money before you die and buy a nice Mountain Hardware climbing bibs and jacket you will be warm at -40. I got the Jacket last year it is sooooooo warm!!!
    DENNY

  7. #7

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    The down stuff will compress to a very small space, it just costs cubic dollars.
    DENNY

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by boneguy View Post
    The down stuff will compress to a very small space, it just costs cubic dollars.
    DENNY
    I have been doing this or 49 years in rural an remote Alaska.........I know vividly exactly about what you are suggesting, that is what I have been doing. I want to make changes. I think the key going forward, is built around the chemical hand and toe warmers. But I want to know if there is a new current better theory.

  9. #9
    Member FairbanksFlies's Avatar
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    Zippo makes a catalytic hand warmer that runs on lighter fluid. They claim it will go for 12 hours or until the fluid runs out. Available on Amazon, but you'll probably have to use dollars as they do not trade for .223 rounds.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by FairbanksFlies View Post
    Zippo makes a catalytic hand warmer that runs on lighter fluid. They claim it will go for 12 hours or until the fluid runs out. Available on Amazon, but you'll probably have to use dollars as they do not trade for .223 rounds.
    Yes those have been round for more then 60 years that that I know of.....we used those in the 50's and 60's. One issue was that they leaked fluid.

    What I am looking for here is a new-different-better system, exclusively for short term winter arctic wilderness survival.

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